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Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ., Volume 11, Issue 1 (March 2021) – 21 articles

Cover Story (view full-size image): Understanding athletic performance predictors is a main sport psychology goal. Sport psychology researchers have extensively examined the relationship of mood within Morgan's Mental Health Model with sport performance since the 1970s. Our overall objective was to quantify this research with competitive athletes and a sport performance outcome in the published literature. After screening more than 600 articles for inclusion, 25 articles provided sufficient data for effect size calculations. The included articles spanned from 1975 to 2011, with 1497 unique participants. Measured before performance, most of the Profile of Mood States scales and total mood score are reliable predictors of sport performance in competitive athletes across a variety of sports and athletic performance outcomes. Morgan's Mental Health Model is still a viable method for understanding athletic performances. View [...] Read more.
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Review
Blockchain System in the Higher Education
Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2021, 11(1), 276-293; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ejihpe11010021 - 16 Mar 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 996
Abstract
Blockchain has emerged as an important concept at the interface of ICT and higher education. It is a system in which a record of transactions is maintained across several computers that are linked in a peer-to-peer network. Hence, it allows the creation of [...] Read more.
Blockchain has emerged as an important concept at the interface of ICT and higher education. It is a system in which a record of transactions is maintained across several computers that are linked in a peer-to-peer network. Hence, it allows the creation of a decentralized environment, where data are not under the control of any third-party organization. This study presents a Systematic Bibliometric Literature Review (LRSB in further text) of research on blockchain applications in the higher education field. The review integrated 37 articles presenting up-to-date knowledge on current implications pertaining to the use of blockchain technology for improving higher education processes. The LRSB findings indicate that blockchain is being used to build up new interventions to improve the prevailing ways of sharing, delivering and securing knowledge data and personal student records. The application of blockchain technology is carrying on a conceptual progress in the higher education sector where it has added substantial value by ameliorated efficiency, effectiveness, privacy control, technological improvement and security of data management mechanisms. Challenges posed by current literature and further research directions are suggested. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue AI and Blockchain as New Trigger in the Education Arena)
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Review
Impact of Different Types of Physical Activity in Green Urban Space on Adult Health and Behaviors: A Systematic Review
Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2021, 11(1), 263-275; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ejihpe11010020 - 04 Mar 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 996
Abstract
This systematic review aimed to investigate the type of physical activity carried out in green urban spaces by the adult population and to value its impact on the population’s health. Additionally, another purpose was to examine if the presence of outdoor gyms in [...] Read more.
This systematic review aimed to investigate the type of physical activity carried out in green urban spaces by the adult population and to value its impact on the population’s health. Additionally, another purpose was to examine if the presence of outdoor gyms in green urban spaces can promote participation in physical activity among adults. Searches of electronic databases, with no time restrictions and up to June 2020, resulted in 10 studies meeting the inclusion criteria. A quantitative assessment is reported as effect size. Many people practiced walking activity as a workout, which showed improvements in health. Walking is the most popular type of training due to its easy accessibility and it not requiring equipment or special skills. Outdoor fitness equipment has been installed in an increasing number of parks and has become very popular worldwide. Further, outdoor fitness equipment provides free access to fitness training and seems to promote physical activity in healthy adults. However, other studies about outdoor fitness equipment efficiency are needed. People living near to equipped areas are more likely to perform outdoor fitness than those who live further away. The most common training programs performed in green urban spaces included exercises with free and easy access, able to promote physical health and perception. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physical Activity and Human Health)
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Brief Report
Evaluation of the Small Changes, Healthy Habits Pilot Program: Its Influence on Healthy Eating and Physical Activity Behaviors of Adults in Louisiana
Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2021, 11(1), 251-262; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ejihpe11010019 - 04 Mar 2021
Viewed by 664
Abstract
The community-based Small Changes, Healthy Habits (SCHH) program was developed to teach skills and techniques to help adults in Louisiana make and maintain small behavioral changes in their food selection, preparation, and consumption, and in physical activity routines. The content of this four-week [...] Read more.
The community-based Small Changes, Healthy Habits (SCHH) program was developed to teach skills and techniques to help adults in Louisiana make and maintain small behavioral changes in their food selection, preparation, and consumption, and in physical activity routines. The content of this four-week program included habit formation and goal setting techniques; physical activity guidance; strategies for a healthier home food environment; a grocery store tour focused on label reading for healthier food selections; basic knife and cooking skills. The program was piloted at ten sites throughout the state. A survey with 14 core items was applied before and after the program to evaluate participant acquisition of skills and behaviors associated with topic areas. A total of 47 participants provided complete data sets. Post-program, these participants reported increased confidence in preparing healthy meals at home (p = 0.04); changes in fats (p = 0.03) and salt (p = 0.01) intake; increased frequency of reading nutrition labels (32%); decreased frequency of meals eaten outside the home (Improvement Index = 0.27); and decreased time/day spent sitting (p < 0.05). These short-term results suggest that the SCHH program has potential to positively affect healthy eating and to reduce sedentary behaviors, both of which are fundamental to good health and wellness. Full article
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Article
Computational Thinking and STEM in Agriculture Vocational Training: A Case Study in a Greek Vocational Education Institution
Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2021, 11(1), 230-250; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ejihpe11010018 - 01 Mar 2021
Viewed by 856
Abstract
Due to the dynamic nature of the agricultural industry, educators and their institutions face difficult challenges as they try to keep pace with future demands for knowledge and skilled workers. On the other hand, computational thinking (CT) has drawn increasing attention in the [...] Read more.
Due to the dynamic nature of the agricultural industry, educators and their institutions face difficult challenges as they try to keep pace with future demands for knowledge and skilled workers. On the other hand, computational thinking (CT) has drawn increasing attention in the field of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education at present and, as advanced technologies and tools emerge, it is imperative for such innovations to be sustained with knowledge and skill among STEM educators and practitioners. The present case study aims to explore the relation between CT, STEM and agricultural education training (AET) in a Greek vocational training institute (IEK), the Agriculture IEK of Metamorfosis city (IEKMC), which is active in agriculture education. The research methodology is utilized according the positivist philosophical approach through data acquisition employing a questionnaire and the quantitative (statistical) analysis of data collected. The sample consists of IEKMC educators and students selected based on simple random sampling. Based on the participants belief that CT and STEM philosophy add value in the learning process, it focuses on the application of knowledge in the real world (students) and problem solving using new technologies (educators). Educators consider “experiments” as the most significant educational tool for problem solving in teaching practice. Students rate Greek Agriculture Education and Training (GAET) higher than educators. However, the participants evaluate GAET very low due to the lack of new innovative teaching methods being introduced. Finally, there is great interest in the implementation of CT and STEM in the European Union (EU) by students and educators. Full article
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Article
Quality in Higher Education and Satisfaction among Professors and Students
Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2021, 11(1), 219-229; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ejihpe11010017 - 21 Feb 2021
Viewed by 848
Abstract
The aim of this study was to analyze the significant differences in satisfaction with educational quality in higher education in Italy (Naples) among students and professors. The sample consisted of 501 higher education students and 121 professors, resulting in a total sample size [...] Read more.
The aim of this study was to analyze the significant differences in satisfaction with educational quality in higher education in Italy (Naples) among students and professors. The sample consisted of 501 higher education students and 121 professors, resulting in a total sample size of 622 subjects. Once the quality parameters of the instrument were determined, reliability was confirmed, and data collection was initiated. In order to analyze the results, a test of independent means (Student’s t-test) was performed, interrelating the variables of educational quality, concerning both management and satisfaction with higher education. Based on the results, we concluded that there are significant differences between the group of students and the group of professors, highlighting a higher level of satisfaction with quality reported by students regarding the coordination of teachers and staff in the educational process; therefore, the inclusion of students in the direct management of the center should be more active and an indicator to be taken into account in self-evaluation. Despite the limitations in the sample at the regional level, it offers many possibilities for future research. Full article
Study Protocol
Immune Fitness and the Psychosocial and Health Consequences of the COVID-19 Pandemic Lockdown in The Netherlands: Methodology and Design of the CLOFIT Study
Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2021, 11(1), 199-218; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ejihpe11010016 - 20 Feb 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1230
Abstract
This article provides an overview of the design and methodology of the “Corona lockdown: how fit are you?” (CLOFIT) study, including the questionnaires and scales that were included in the online survey. The aim of the CLOFIT study was to investigate the psychosocial [...] Read more.
This article provides an overview of the design and methodology of the “Corona lockdown: how fit are you?” (CLOFIT) study, including the questionnaires and scales that were included in the online survey. The aim of the CLOFIT study was to investigate the psychosocial and health consequences of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic in the Netherlands. The survey was conducted among the Dutch population to collect data on immune fitness and the psychological and health consequences of the 2019 coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic lockdown in the Netherlands. The CLOFIT dataset contains measures from N = 1910 participants and is broadly representative of the Dutch general population. The dataset represents both sexes, a range of ages including the elderly, different education levels, and ethnic backgrounds. The cohort also includes people with a diverse health status and range of medication use. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Research in Clinical and Health Contexts)
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Article
The Use of Single-Item Ratings Versus Traditional Multiple-Item Questionnaires to Assess Mood and Health
Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2021, 11(1), 183-198; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ejihpe11010015 - 20 Feb 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 667
Abstract
Collecting real-world evidence via ‘at home’ assessments in ambulatory patients or healthy volunteers is becoming increasingly important, both for research purposes and in clinical practice. However, given the mobile technology that is frequently used for these assessments, concise assessments are preferred. The current [...] Read more.
Collecting real-world evidence via ‘at home’ assessments in ambulatory patients or healthy volunteers is becoming increasingly important, both for research purposes and in clinical practice. However, given the mobile technology that is frequently used for these assessments, concise assessments are preferred. The current study compared single-item ratings with multiple-item subscale scores of the same construct, by calculating the corresponding Bland and Altman 95% limits of agreement interval. The analysis showed that single-item ratings are usually in good agreement with assessments of their corresponding subscale. In the case of more complex multimodal constructs, single-item assessments were much less often in agreement with multiple-item questionnaire outcomes. The use of single-item assessments is advocated as they more often incorporate assessments of all aspects of a certain construct (including the presence, severity, and impact of the construct under investigation) compared to composite symptom scores. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Research in Clinical and Health Contexts)
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Article
Do Bilinguals Acquire Similar Words to Monolinguals? An Examination of Word Acquisition and the Similarity Effect in Japanese—English Bilinguals’ Vocabularies
Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2021, 11(1), 168-182; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ejihpe11010014 - 20 Feb 2021
Viewed by 585
Abstract
Previous research has paid much attention to the overall acquisition of vocabularies among bilingual children in comparison to their monolingual counterparts. Much less attention has been paid to the type of words acquired and the possible transfer or cross-linguistic effects of the other [...] Read more.
Previous research has paid much attention to the overall acquisition of vocabularies among bilingual children in comparison to their monolingual counterparts. Much less attention has been paid to the type of words acquired and the possible transfer or cross-linguistic effects of the other language on vocabulary development. Thus, this study aims to explore similarities and dissimilarities in the vocabularies of simultaneous bilinguals and Japanese monolinguals and considers the possible cross-linguistic similarity effect on word acquisition. Six simultaneous Japanese–English bilingual children (mean age = 34.75 months (2.56)) were language–age-matched with six Japanese monolinguals; their productive vocabularies were compared regarding size and categories. Additionally, characteristic acquired words were compared using correspondence analyses. Results showed that, although delayed due to the reduced inputs, young bilinguals have a similar set of vocabularies in terms of word category as monolinguals. However, bilingual children’s vocabularies reflect their unevenly distributed experience with the language. Fewer interactive experiences with language speakers may result in a lower acquisition of interactive words. Furthermore, there is a cross-linguistic effect on acquisition, likely caused by form similarity between Japanese katakana words and English words. Even between languages with great dissimilarities, resources and cues are sought and used to facilitate bilingual vocabulary acquisition. Full article
Review
Blockchain and Higher Education Diplomas
Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2021, 11(1), 154-167; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ejihpe11010013 - 19 Feb 2021
Viewed by 967
Abstract
Due to added mobility and the increase in international students worldwide, as well as the current problem regarding the counterfeiting of diplomas and the selling of fraudulent certificates, we propose a technological solution. Namely, to ally blockchain technology to higher education certificates and [...] Read more.
Due to added mobility and the increase in international students worldwide, as well as the current problem regarding the counterfeiting of diplomas and the selling of fraudulent certificates, we propose a technological solution. Namely, to ally blockchain technology to higher education certificates and diplomas, to make the process of checking for academic qualifications more facilitated and transparent. Employers of graduates, as well as higher education institutions which evaluate course applicants, would benefit. Perhaps equally as important, students applying for international degree programs would have their lives simplified. There is an increased pressure to ensure the legitimacy and authenticity of certifications and diplomas—and preferably without the current “hassle” of getting diplomas recognized by official entities. New technological advances, with the development of blockchain and smart contracts, with their characteristics of immutability, decentralization, security, traceability, and consensus, may be considered an excellent match to implement a robust and reliable anti-fraud solution to issue digital diplomas. Radical innovations, such as linking blockchain and higher education diplomas, involve significant change and novelty. Linking blockchain and higher education diplomas could potentially positively impact and benefit millions of people worldwide, especially the younger generations. This study involved a literature review and the searching of the Scopus database (refereed publications) for the following concepts: blockchain and diploma. Existing literature is recent, with most articles (25) published between 2019 and 2020, with 4 in 2018 and only 1 in 2017. This was aligned with our expectations since the development of blockchain utilization outside financial and crypto-assets industries is recent, and it is known as “Blockchain 3.0”. We can additionally affirm that the topic is attracting attention and efforts from researchers worldwide and that some higher education institutions have already implemented ad hoc solutions. As it is, the sector lacks a unified response to the problem of automatic and reliable higher education diploma certification. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue AI and Blockchain as New Trigger in the Education Arena)
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Article
Adaptation and Validation of the Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire for Spanish Adolescents
Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2021, 11(1), 142-153; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ejihpe11010012 - 13 Feb 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 969
Abstract
This work adapts and validates the scale of the motivated strategies for learning questionnaire (MSLQ), which is used to measure motivation. For this, an instrumental design was carried out with the purpose of analyzing the psychometric properties of the instrument. The sample consisted [...] Read more.
This work adapts and validates the scale of the motivated strategies for learning questionnaire (MSLQ), which is used to measure motivation. For this, an instrumental design was carried out with the purpose of analyzing the psychometric properties of the instrument. The sample consisted of 307 participants enrolled in compulsory secondary education. Reliability with fit indices were good in model B (proposed) with composite reliability, global reliability index, and Cronbach’s alpha. The original model (A) presented small problems that had to be adjusted when carrying out the translation. We concluded that adaptation and subsequent validation of the MSLQ instrument into a Spanish context was positive. In this sense, adequate adjustment rates have been achieved. However, in its contextual adequacy, the need arises to modify the presentation of the items alluding to intrinsic motivation due to the difficulty of measuring such a construct. Among the implications reached in this study is the possibility of having a validated instrument for the Spanish adolescent context to measure motivation on educational aspects. Furthermore, this tool can serve as the basis for the design of other instruments that measure this construct in other age ranges. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Coexistence, Attention to Diversity, and Education)
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Article
The Relation between Social Capital and Academic Motivation of Students: A Study of Health Professional Education in Japan
Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2021, 11(1), 129-141; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ejihpe11010011 - 09 Feb 2021
Viewed by 1172
Abstract
Academic motivation consists of reward-based extrinsic motivation and curiosity-based intrinsic motivation. Students studying at university or college develop several new social connections with friends, classmates, and teachers, in addition to their family and community. Belonging to their networks, students acquire opinions, appreciation, trust, [...] Read more.
Academic motivation consists of reward-based extrinsic motivation and curiosity-based intrinsic motivation. Students studying at university or college develop several new social connections with friends, classmates, and teachers, in addition to their family and community. Belonging to their networks, students acquire opinions, appreciation, trust, and norms of the society. Whether those social connections enhance the motivation of university students for academic work is a question yet to be answered in the context of health profession education in Japan. Judo-therapist education is a form of health profession education in Japan. This study aimed to measure the academic motivation and social capital (SC) of judo-therapist students in Japan, and to find the relation between social capital and academic motivation. This cross-sectional study recruited a total of 2247 students applying multi-stage sampling across Japan. A Japanese version Academic Motivation Scale (AMS) measured the learning motivation in three constructs: (1) intrinsic motivation (IM); (2) extrinsic motivation (EM); and (3) amotivation (alpha 0.94). A newly-developed 46-itemed, 4-pointed scale measured social capital (SC) in five constructs: (1) family relations, (2) on-campus friends, (3) off-campus friends, (4) classroom social capital; and (5) regional social capital (alpha 0.85). Robust regression analysis treated all constructs of SC as independent variables and IM and EM as dependent variables respectively in the three models. Among the average level of constructs, the family SC average level was the highest. Classroom SC was less than family SC and community SC was the lowest. Intrinsic motivation is positively influenced by classroom SC the most, followed by family SC, on-campus friends’ SC, and community SC. Extrinsic motivation is positively influenced by classroom SC the most, followed by family SC, on-campus friends’ SC, and community SC. Amotivation is negatively influenced by social capital constructs except external friends’ SC. In conclusion, social connections have the power to enhance the motivation of university students’ academic work within health profession education. The relations, trust and bonds developed in the classroom may allow an adult learner’s motivation to evolve into autonomous intrinsic motivation and prevent amotivation. Full article
Article
Exploration of the Spanish Version of the Attachment Style Questionnaire: A Comparative Study between Spanish, Italian, and Japanese Culture
Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2021, 11(1), 113-128; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ejihpe11010010 - 04 Feb 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1438
Abstract
Nowadays, there are several human attachment measures, most in the form of questionnaires that assess adult attachment styles. This study investigates the use of Feeney, Noller, Hanrahan, Sperling and Berman’s five-factors Attachment Style Questionnaire (ASQ, 1994), based on Bartholomew’s four-factors model (1991), and [...] Read more.
Nowadays, there are several human attachment measures, most in the form of questionnaires that assess adult attachment styles. This study investigates the use of Feeney, Noller, Hanrahan, Sperling and Berman’s five-factors Attachment Style Questionnaire (ASQ, 1994), based on Bartholomew’s four-factors model (1991), and Hazan and Shaver’s three-factors model (1987). Nevertheless, no robust study has explored the ASQ questionnaire in Spanish compared to other cultures, such as Italian and Japanese. Therefore, the linguistic translation of the Spanish version of the ASQ was performed, based on the back-translation methodology. The results indicate that 5-factors ASQ Spanish version explains 43.67% of the variance, similar to the original English-Australian ASQ version. The Italian and Japanese versions explain 49.37% and 52.27% of the variance, respectively. No age correlation for any ASQ factors in the Japanese sample was found; meanwhile, the Spanish and Italian cultures showed a positive correlation with age and “Confidence” and negative correlation with age and “Relationships as Secondary” ASQ factors. Some transcultural differences and possible research approaches are addressed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Research in Clinical and Health Contexts)
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Editorial
Acknowledgment to Reviewers of European Journal of Investigation in Health, Psychology and Education in 2020
Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2021, 11(1), 110-112; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ejihpe11010009 - 28 Jan 2021
Viewed by 674
Abstract
Peer review is the driving force of journal development, and reviewers are gatekeepers who ensure that European Journal of Investigation in Health, Psychology and Education maintains its standards for the high quality of its published papers [...] Full article
Article
Risk Perception and Ethnic Background in Construction Workers: Results of a Cross-Sectional Study in a Group of Trainees of a Vocational School in Italy
Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2021, 11(1), 96-109; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ejihpe11010008 - 26 Jan 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 889
Abstract
Risk perception can be influenced by cultural background. The study aims to evaluate risk perception, considering different ethnicities of construction workers from vocational schools in Italy. We administered a questionnaire investigating four different dimensions: Perceived behavioral control (PBC), Danger perception (DP), Safety climate [...] Read more.
Risk perception can be influenced by cultural background. The study aims to evaluate risk perception, considering different ethnicities of construction workers from vocational schools in Italy. We administered a questionnaire investigating four different dimensions: Perceived behavioral control (PBC), Danger perception (DP), Safety climate (SC), and Attitude towards safe actions (ATSA). 562 workers answered: 72.4% from Italy, 14.2% from eastern Europe, 9.4% from Balkans, and 3.9% from North Africa. The participants indicated quite low control, attributable to the haste in performing the job. The workers perceived their specific job tasks as riskier compared to the tasks of their colleagues. They reported as fundamental the respecting of safety rules, but indicating that supervisors do not adequately promote safety behaviors. Finally, construction workers judged as “brave” the colleagues working without protective equipment. When compared to Italians, North Africa workers showed a lower perception of the possibility to control their safe behaviors (p = 0.040), while both eastern Europeans and Balkan obtained higher scores at the ATSA dimension, indicating a kind of fatalistic acceptance of the risky situations at work. Eastern Europeans also showed a lower perception of the dangers (p = 0.002), while Balkan demonstrated a perception of SC even better than the Italian group (p = 0.005). Full article
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Article
Testing the Role of Emotion Dysregulation as a Predictor of Juvenile Recidivism
Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2021, 11(1), 83-95; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ejihpe11010007 - 21 Jan 2021
Viewed by 839
Abstract
The current study proposed to determine whether adolescent emotion regulation is predictive of the amount and type of crime committed by adolescent juvenile offenders. Despite evidence in the literature linking emotion regulation to behaviour problems and aggression across the lifespan, there is no [...] Read more.
The current study proposed to determine whether adolescent emotion regulation is predictive of the amount and type of crime committed by adolescent juvenile offenders. Despite evidence in the literature linking emotion regulation to behaviour problems and aggression across the lifespan, there is no prior longitudinal research examining the predictive role of emotion regulation on adolescent recidivism, nor data regarding how emotion regulation relates to the occurrence of specific types of crimes. Our primary hypothesis was that poor emotion regulation would positively and significantly predict re-offending among adolescents. We tested our hypothesis within a binary logistic framework utilizing the Pathways to Desistance longitudinal data. Exploratory bivariate analyses were conducted regarding emotion regulation and type of crime in the service of future hypothesis generation. Though the findings did not indicate a statistically significant relation between emotion regulation and reoffending, exploratory findings suggest that some types of crime may be more linked to emotion regulation than others. In sum, the present study aimed to examine a hypothesized relation between emotion regulation and juvenile delinquency by identifying how the individual factor of dysregulated emotion regulation may have played a role. This study’s findings did not provide evidence that emotion regulation was a significant predictor of recidivism over time but did suggest that emotion regulation is related to participation in certain types of crime one year later. Directions for future research that build upon the current study were described. Indeed, identifying emotion regulation as a predictor of adolescent crime has the potential to enhance current crime prevention efforts and clinical treatments for juvenile offenders; this is based on the large amount of treatment literature, which documents that emotion regulation is malleable through treatment and prevention programming. Full article
Perspective
Antimicrobial Resistance in the Context of the Sustainable Development Goals: A Brief Review
Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2021, 11(1), 71-82; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ejihpe11010006 - 19 Jan 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1169
Abstract
The reduction in infectious disease morbidity and mortality may be attributed to a variety of factors; however, improved sanitation and public health, and the introduction of vaccines and antibiotics are among the most significant. The development of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) in bacterial pathogens [...] Read more.
The reduction in infectious disease morbidity and mortality may be attributed to a variety of factors; however, improved sanitation and public health, and the introduction of vaccines and antibiotics are among the most significant. The development of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) in bacterial pathogens is an expected consequence of evolutionary adaptation to these noxious agents and the widespread use of these drugs has significantly sped up this process. Infections caused by multidrug resistant pathogens are directly associated with worse clinical outcomes, longer hospital stays, excess mortality in the affected patients and an increasing burden and costs on the healthcare infrastructure. The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) were published in 2015 by the United Nations to serve as a global blueprint for a better, more equitable, more sustainable life on our planet. The SDGs contextualize AMR as a global public health and societal issue; in addition, the continuing emergence of AMR may limit the attainment on many SDGs. The aim of this mini-review is to provide insight on the interface between attainment of SDGs and the clinical problem of drug resistance in bacteria. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Research in Clinical and Health Contexts)
Review
The Profile of Moods States and Athletic Performance: A Meta-Analysis of Published Studies
Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2021, 11(1), 50-70; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ejihpe11010005 - 13 Jan 2021
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1425 | Correction
Abstract
Researchers have extensively examined and reviewed the relationship of the profile of mood states (POMS) with sport performance since the 1970s. Two decades have passed since the last POMS quantitative review. Our overall objective was to quantify the POMS research with competitive athletes [...] Read more.
Researchers have extensively examined and reviewed the relationship of the profile of mood states (POMS) with sport performance since the 1970s. Two decades have passed since the last POMS quantitative review. Our overall objective was to quantify the POMS research with competitive athletes with a prospective measured POMS and a sport performance outcome in the published literature. Additionally, we tested potential moderators of the mental health model (i.e., sport duration, type, and skill) with meta-analytic techniques while considering potential risk bias across study sources. Based on a systematic review, the articles were found using EBSCO and comparing these articles with extensive past POMS in sport and exercise bibliographies. Search terms included profile of mood states (POMS) or iceberg profile or the mental health model with sport and performance or sports performance. For selection, articles must have reported data on competitive athletes, an athletic performance outcome, and a valid form of the POMS measured prospectively. After screening more than 600 articles for inclusion, 25 articles provided sufficient data for effect size calculations. The included articles spanned from 1975 to 2011, with 1497 unique participants. Hedges’ g values were generally small for the six POMS scales: tension (−0.21), depression (−0.43), anger (−0.08), vigor (0.38), fatigue (−0.13), and confusion (−0.41). However, the total mood disturbance (TMD) score effect size was medium in magnitude at −0.53. When corrected for potential publication bias, the effect size values increased in magnitude for tension (−0.47), depression (−0.64), vigor (0.44), fatigue (−0.34), and TMD (−0.84). Moderator analyses for Terry’s (1995) propositions and for risk of bias across studies, statistically, resulted in few differences based on conventional statistical significance (p < 0.05). Measured before performance, most of the POMS scales and TMD are reliable predictors of sport performance in competitive athletes across a wide variety of sports and athletic performance outcomes. Morgan’s (1980, 1985) mental health model or iceberg profile minus anger is still a viable method for understanding and improving athletic performances. Full article
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Article
Multivariate Analysis of Attitudes, Knowledge and Use of ICT in Students Involved in Virtual Research Seedbeds
Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2021, 11(1), 33-49; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ejihpe11010004 - 10 Jan 2021
Viewed by 804
Abstract
The incorporation of information and communication technologies (ICTs) in higher education has been carried out in a transversal manner within the curriculum, and the processes of formative research in both face-to-face and virtual programmes are not an exception to this process. In this [...] Read more.
The incorporation of information and communication technologies (ICTs) in higher education has been carried out in a transversal manner within the curriculum, and the processes of formative research in both face-to-face and virtual programmes are not an exception to this process. In this context, it is recognised that students’ perceptions of the inclusion of technologies in the classroom can influence their teaching and learning process; however, they have not been widely addressed in multiple settings including research seedbeds. Thus, this paper aims to identify such perceptions represented in the attitudes, knowledge and uses of ICTs in students ascribed to the research seedbed in a virtual business administration programme of an Institution of Higher Education located in Colombia. For its fulfillment, the ACUTIC scale was applied to a sample of 65 students in order to identify these perceptions through a hierarchical cluster analysis, a single factor analysis of variance (ANOVA) test, a post hoc Tukey method and a factor analysis. The main result is that attitudes, knowledge and use of ICTs are varied and they can be represented in three clusters. In general, the attitude towards the incorporation of technologies in the research seedbed is positive; however, there is a gap in terms of knowledge and use, especially of those tools oriented to the disciplinary field and research. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Teaching Innovation in Higher Education: Areas of Knowledge)
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Review
Projection of E-Learning in Higher Education: A Study of Its Scientific Production in Web of Science
Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2021, 11(1), 20-32; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ejihpe11010003 - 10 Jan 2021
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1033
Abstract
E-learning is conceived as a purely virtual training approach. Different learning styles have been proliferated in recent years, especially now, due to the impact of COVID-19 in the educational field. The aim of this study is to discover the evolution of e-learning in [...] Read more.
E-learning is conceived as a purely virtual training approach. Different learning styles have been proliferated in recent years, especially now, due to the impact of COVID-19 in the educational field. The aim of this study is to discover the evolution of e-learning in higher education (ELHI) in scientific literature indexed on the Web of Science. Co-word analysis and bibliometric analysis was performed. A total matrix of 1261 documents was analyzed through SciMAT software. The results revealed that studies on ELHI are written in English and presented by conference papers. The main source of publication for the conferences is EDULEARN proceedings, while the journal source is Procedia-Social and Behavioral Sciences. Spain is the country with the highest volume of production. It is concluded that research on ELHI use does not have an established line of research, due to its recent creation and the lack of related research. The bibliometric analysis specifies that the research is oriented towards knowing the level of acceptance and application of the pedagogical method in the teaching and learning processes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Teaching Innovation in Higher Education: Areas of Knowledge)
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Article
Long-Term Lateral Semicircular Canal Function in Children with Cochlear Implants: Results of Video Head Impulse Test
Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2021, 11(1), 12-19; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ejihpe11010002 - 09 Jan 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 658
Abstract
In children with profound deafness, bilateral cochlear implant (CI) is an effective, established procedure. However, its safety on vestibular function has recently been debated. The goal of this study is to evaluate the long-term lateral semicircular canal high-frequency vestibulo-oculomotor reflex (LSC HF VOR) [...] Read more.
In children with profound deafness, bilateral cochlear implant (CI) is an effective, established procedure. However, its safety on vestibular function has recently been debated. The goal of this study is to evaluate the long-term lateral semicircular canal high-frequency vestibulo-oculomotor reflex (LSC HF VOR) in children with CI by video head impulse testing (vHIT). This is a cross-sectional study assessing a cohort of children who received either a unilateral (12) or a bilateral (12) cochlear implant (CI), compared with a control group of 12 normal-hearing children. No significant LSC HF VOR gain difference was found between CI users and controls. In the unilaterally implanted group, the LSC HF VOR gain measured in the “CI-ON” condition was significantly higher than in the “CI-OFF” condition, both in the implanted and in the non-implanted ear. In the bilaterally implanted group, the difference between the two conditions was not significant. Our results do not show any impairment of LSC HF VOR function in children with CI compared to normal-hearing children in the long-term period. This suggests that both unilateral and simultaneous/sequential bilateral CI are procedures that do not impair HF LSC long-term function when analyzed by vHIT. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Research in Clinical and Health Contexts)
Article
The Relationship of Personality, Emotional Intelligence, and Aggressiveness in Students: A Study Using the Big Five Personality Questionnaire for Children and Adults (BFQ-NA)
Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2021, 11(1), 1-11; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ejihpe11010001 - 25 Dec 2020
Viewed by 990
Abstract
An analysis of secondary students’ personality traits, along with a description of their emotional intelligence levels and their anger control, could be decisive when educating students to prevent anti-social behavior in academia. Very few studies on personality, emotional intelligence, and aggressive conduct exist [...] Read more.
An analysis of secondary students’ personality traits, along with a description of their emotional intelligence levels and their anger control, could be decisive when educating students to prevent anti-social behavior in academia. Very few studies on personality, emotional intelligence, and aggressive conduct exist in Spain. Some of the studies that do exist, however, only explore the relationship between emotional intelligence, personality, and prosocial behavior in secondary education students. Likewise, there are few studies focusing on personality and aggression control. In this study, using the Big Five personality models as predictors of aggressiveness in subjects and of emotional intelligence, we sought to contribute to the improvement of the education of students on aggressive behavior in education centers. To do this, we conducted a study using the Big Five Personality Questionnaire (BFQ) for Children and Adults (BFQ-NA), the Trait Meta-Mood Scale (TMMS-24) emotional intelligence test, and the State–Trait Anger Expression Inventory (STAXI) anger management test. Our main objective was to analyze the relationship of the BFQ with the variables of emotional intelligence and aggressiveness. This was achieved using a range of bivariate correlation and multiple regression tests. The results showed the correlation and predictive value of emotional intelligence and aggression in the Big Five model of personality. This study coincides with other research linking Big Five questionnaires with emotional intelligence and aggression. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emotional Intelligence and Life Satisfaction)
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