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Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ., Volume 12, Issue 5 (May 2022) – 5 articles

Cover Story (view full-size image): In recent years, a multitude of scientific publications on health science are being developed that require a correct bibliographic search in order to avoid the use and inclusion of retracted literature. The use of retracted articles could directly affect the consistency of scientific studies and thus impact clinical practice. The results showed that although Google Scholar was the search engine with the highest capacity to retrieve selected articles, it was the least effective at providing information on the retraction of articles. The use of different scientific search engines to retrieve as many scientific articles as possible, as well as never solely using a generic search engine, is highly recommended. View this paper
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Article
Online Feedback Systems and Debate on Scientific Issues during COVID-19: A Case Study on Sookmyung Women’s University
Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2022, 12(5), 494-515; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ejihpe12050037 - 23 May 2022
Viewed by 474
Abstract
As the COVID-19 pandemic continues, university education and feedback guidance have inevitably moved to online platforms, becoming a global trend. This study focuses on a case of Sookmyung Women’s University in South Korea, which has operated an online discussion clinic for university general [...] Read more.
As the COVID-19 pandemic continues, university education and feedback guidance have inevitably moved to online platforms, becoming a global trend. This study focuses on a case of Sookmyung Women’s University in South Korea, which has operated an online discussion clinic for university general education for more than a year as a case study. There are two main research methods. A frequency analysis was conducted to confirm what kind of counseling the students preferred at the discussion clinic based on the answers written in the students’ applications. The students whose applications were used for the analysis were divided into 57 teams, and there were two to six members per team. The results were as follows: In the survey results, students wanted help with the preparation process necessary for the discussion and the practical strategies for facilitating discussions. They wanted personalized counseling, demonstrating that discussion education provided in the foundational curriculum is insufficient. Second, the educational model of the discussion clinic and educational examples were examined. The findings confirmed that online discussion education is effective if the system is technically supplemented. Instructors and researchers are prepared to meet students’ demands for feedback and individual counseling, even if these are not provided through face-to-face discussions. Additionally, face-to-face guidance can be operated more effectively by taking advantage of online systems. The findings also demonstrate that further research on designing and operating online discussion centers is required. This study is a preceding study on developing online systems and educational guidelines for higher educational institutions to present new insights into smart learning. This paper also includes suggestions for educational and scientific discussions. The online discussion instructional model shown in this paper explores methods of scientific communication through a debate on scientific issues. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Internet Uses in the Current Age: What Changed?)
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Article
The Role of a Ministry of Education in Addressing Distance Education during Emergency Education
Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2022, 12(5), 478-493; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ejihpe12050036 - 20 May 2022
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Abstract
The present study aims to identify the role of a Ministry of Education in meeting the challenges faced due to distance education as emergency education. The study participants were nine officials working at the Palestinian Ministry of Education and Higher Education. We used [...] Read more.
The present study aims to identify the role of a Ministry of Education in meeting the challenges faced due to distance education as emergency education. The study participants were nine officials working at the Palestinian Ministry of Education and Higher Education. We used interviews to collect data and inductive content analysis to analyze these data. The study result indicates that the ministry carried out action related to the different educational aspects to meet distance education challenges. It is recommended that ministries of education strengthen their collaboration with the local community. The aim of this collaboration is two-fold: encouraging parents’ support of technology integration in education and encouraging their role in positively influencing their students’ perceptions of the use of ICT in learning. Teachers also need to engage in the change of students’ perception towards a more positive one regarding the influence of ICT on learning. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Trends and Perspectives for the Positive Use of ICT in Education)
Article
Evaluating the Dimensionality of the Sociocultural Adaptation Scale in a Sample of International Students Sojourning in Los Angeles: Which Difference between Eastern and Western Culture?
Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2022, 12(5), 465-477; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ejihpe12050035 - 18 May 2022
Viewed by 483
Abstract
The Sociocultural Adaptation Scale (SCAS) measures the degree of sociocultural competence in new cultural settings, and, despite its popularity, research aiming at evaluating its dimensionality is lacking and has incongruent results. Moreover, the dimensionality of the scale has been mainly tested on different [...] Read more.
The Sociocultural Adaptation Scale (SCAS) measures the degree of sociocultural competence in new cultural settings, and, despite its popularity, research aiming at evaluating its dimensionality is lacking and has incongruent results. Moreover, the dimensionality of the scale has been mainly tested on different samples adjusted to Eastern culture. We administered the SCAS to 266 international students sojourning in Los Angeles to test which underlying dimensionality emerges if the measure is used to assess sociocultural adaptation to Western culture, also verifying its measurement invariance across sex. Findings from EFA showed a three-factor solution: Diversity Approach, Social Functioning, and Distance and Life Changes, and the CFA indicated a plausible goodness-of-fit to the empirical data. The examination of MGCFA suggested that the questionnaire showed an invariant structure across sex. Our results suggest that the dimensionality of the SCAS may differ according to the sojourners’ country of settlement, emphasizing Western–Eastern differences. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Factors Related to School Coexistence at Different Educational Stages)
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Article
Improving the Reliability of Literature Reviews: Detection of Retracted Articles through Academic Search Engines
Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2022, 12(5), 458-464; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ejihpe12050034 - 04 May 2022
Viewed by 1264
Abstract
Nowadays, a multitude of scientific publications on health science are being developed that require correct bibliographic search in order to avoid the use and inclusion of retracted literature in them. The use of these articles could directly affect the consistency of the scientific [...] Read more.
Nowadays, a multitude of scientific publications on health science are being developed that require correct bibliographic search in order to avoid the use and inclusion of retracted literature in them. The use of these articles could directly affect the consistency of the scientific studies and could affect clinical practice. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the capacity of the main scientific literature search engines, both general (Gooogle Scholar) and scientific (PubMed, EMBASE, SCOPUS, and Web of Science), used in health sciences in order to check their ability to detect and warn users of retracted articles in the searches carried out. The sample of retracted articles was obtained from RetractionWatch. The results showed that although Google Scholar was the search engine with the highest capacity to retrieve selected articles, it was the least effective, compared with scientific search engines, at providing information on the retraction of articles. The use of different scientific search engines to retrieve as many scientific articles as possible, as well as never using only a generic search engine, is highly recommended. This will reduce the possibility of including retracted articles and will avoid affecting the reliability of the scientific studies carried out. Full article
Article
Personal Need for Structure and Fractions in Mathematical Education
Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2022, 12(5), 448-457; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ejihpe12050033 - 29 Apr 2022
Viewed by 652
Abstract
The research was aimed at finding relations between mathematical knowledge and cognitive individual variable. We realized the experiment with 162 students of the Constantine the Philosopher University in Nitra, Slovakia. We had two variables—the personal need for structure (PNS) as a cognitive-individual variable [...] Read more.
The research was aimed at finding relations between mathematical knowledge and cognitive individual variable. We realized the experiment with 162 students of the Constantine the Philosopher University in Nitra, Slovakia. We had two variables—the personal need for structure (PNS) as a cognitive-individual variable and knowledge of the fraction as a mathematical variable. The relationships between the factors of the personal need for structure scale and the knowledge of fractions were determined by the IRT model. We have proven a negative correlation between the successful solving of fraction test and score in the PNS scale. This means that the higher the success rate of solving the fraction tasks, the lower the overall score on the personal need for structure scale and its subfactors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Mathematics Education)
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