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Dent. J., Volume 2, Issue 4 (December 2014) – 6 articles , Pages 98-162

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Case Report
Gingival Harmony in Anterior Aesthetic Restorations
Dent. J. 2014, 2(4), 155-162; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/dj2040155 - 05 Dec 2014
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 3912
Abstract
This article describes a case of gingival asymmetry with compromising aesthetics. A 25-year-old dental student presented to the department of prosthetic dentistry. She was concerned about the greyish transparency of the crown metal margin through the marginal gingiva. The crown was placed to [...] Read more.
This article describes a case of gingival asymmetry with compromising aesthetics. A 25-year-old dental student presented to the department of prosthetic dentistry. She was concerned about the greyish transparency of the crown metal margin through the marginal gingiva. The crown was placed to restore her lateral incisor. A comprehensive examination revealed that this unaesthetic aspect was caused by a non-harmonious gingival architecture in the lateral incisor marked by an unaesthetic gingival Zenith. The treatment plan included a surgical crown lengthening followed by prosthetic therapy consisting in a Zirconia based crown replacing the old prosthesis. Thanks to a well-planned multi-disciplinary approach, the result was esthetically acceptable and the patient was satisfied. Full article
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Review
Oronasal Fistula and Complete Edentulism: What to Do?
Dent. J. 2014, 2(4), 142-154; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/dj2040142 - 05 Dec 2014
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 3061
Abstract
Oronasal fistula is an internal fistula which represents an abnormal epitheliazed tract between oral and nasal cavity, thus impairing associated functions of deglutition and speech by nasal regurgitation of fluid and nasal speech respectively, besides risk of nasal infection resulting from food lodgement. [...] Read more.
Oronasal fistula is an internal fistula which represents an abnormal epitheliazed tract between oral and nasal cavity, thus impairing associated functions of deglutition and speech by nasal regurgitation of fluid and nasal speech respectively, besides risk of nasal infection resulting from food lodgement. This paper provides a brief yet definitive insight on the etiology, diagnosis and surgical closure of oronasal fistula along with a case report and discussion on prosthodontic rehabilitation of a 65 year old female with an iatrogenic oronasal fistula developed as a result of maxillary molar extraction using a complete metal based denture. Full article
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Article
Oral Mucosal Disorders in Pregnant versus Non-Pregnant Women
Dent. J. 2014, 2(4), 134-141; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/dj2040134 - 02 Dec 2014
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 3337
Abstract
The effects of pregnancy on the Oral Mucosa Disorder (OMD) have been sporadically documented in some developed countries. Less known is the status of OMD during pregnancy in less developed/developing countries. Iran is no exception. This study assesses the prevalence of OMD in [...] Read more.
The effects of pregnancy on the Oral Mucosa Disorder (OMD) have been sporadically documented in some developed countries. Less known is the status of OMD during pregnancy in less developed/developing countries. Iran is no exception. This study assesses the prevalence of OMD in 200 pregnant women and compares the findings with the findings from a 200 non-pregnant woman of similar age distribution in Iran. The participants had been referred to a clinic to receive reproductive age-related services. Participants suffering from systemic chronic diseases, those on medications/drugs, smokers, needing biopsies, and those with urgent Oral Mucosal Lesion (OML) treatments were excluded from the study. Oral mucosal of all 400 participants were examined. The participants’ age ranges were from 17 to 47; with the average age of 33.14 for one group; and 30.23 for the other group. Both groups had the same level of formal education. Out of 400 examined women; 62 had lesions, including 47 pregnant (23.5%); and 15 non-pregnant (7.5%) women. This result shows that the OMD rate of occurrence was significantly higher among the pregnant women. Higher OML prevalence in pregnant women, as compared to the non-pregnant women, indicates the importance of timely oral examination of pregnant women and subsequent treatment plans for them. Full article
Article
High Birth Weight Is a Risk Factor of Dental Caries Increment during Adolescence in Sweden
Dent. J. 2014, 2(4), 118-133; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/dj2040118 - 20 Nov 2014
Cited by 14 | Viewed by 3199
Abstract
This study aimed to assess whether birth weight is associated with dental caries during the teenage period. In this register-based cohort study, all children of 13 years of age (n = 18,142) who resided in the county of Stockholm, Sweden, in 2000, were [...] Read more.
This study aimed to assess whether birth weight is associated with dental caries during the teenage period. In this register-based cohort study, all children of 13 years of age (n = 18,142) who resided in the county of Stockholm, Sweden, in 2000, were included. The cohort was followed until individuals were 19 years of age. Information regarding dental caries was collected from the Public Health Care Administration in Stockholm. Data concerning prenatal and perinatal factors and parental socio-demographic determinants were collected from the Swedish Medical Birth Register and National Registers at Statistics Sweden. The final logistic regression model showed that birth weight ≥4000 g, adjusted for potential confounders, was significantly associated with caries increment (DMFT ≥ 1 (D = decayed, M = missing, F = filled, T = teeth)) between 13 and 19 age (OR, 1.22; 95% CI = 1.09–1.36). The relatively enhanced risk OR was further increased from 1.22 to 1.43 in subjects with birth weight ≥4600 g. On the contrary, subjects with birth weight <2500 g exhibited a significantly lower risk (OR, 0.67; 95% CI = 0.50–0.89) for exhibiting caries experience (DMFT ≥ 4) at 19 years of age. In conclusion, high birth weight can be regarded as a predictor for dental caries, and especially, birth weight ≥4500 g is a risk factor for caries increment during adolescence. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pediatric Dentistry-1)
Article
Clinical and Radiological Outcome of Titanium Implants in Clinical Practice: A 5 Year, Prospective, Multicenter Case Series
Dent. J. 2014, 2(4), 106-117; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/dj2040106 - 20 Nov 2014
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 3300
Abstract
The objective of this prospective clinical case series was to confirm the 5-year clinical and radiographic performance of titanium implants occlusally loaded after 12 weeks. Periapical X-rays for quantitative bone level assessment were taken immediately post-surgery, after loading, 6 and 12 months, and [...] Read more.
The objective of this prospective clinical case series was to confirm the 5-year clinical and radiographic performance of titanium implants occlusally loaded after 12 weeks. Periapical X-rays for quantitative bone level assessment were taken immediately post-surgery, after loading, 6 and 12 months, and 5 years after loading. Pocket depth (PD) and clinical attachment level (CAL) were measured. One-hundred and fourteen implants were inserted in 71 consecutive patients; 111 (97%) implants/69 (97%) patients were followed for 5 years. One implant was lost before loading (acute infection of unknown origin). Another patient developed peri-implantitis in the healing phase, and underwent successful surgical revision. Mesial median bone level at 6 and 12 months, and 5 years was 1.2 (SD ± 0.7), 1.3 (SD ± 0.7) and 1.1 (SD ± 0.6) mm; distal values were: 1.1 (SD ± 0.7), 1.4 (SD ± 0.7) and 1.2 (SD ± 0.6) mm; below implant shoulder. Stable CAL (1.2–1.6 mm) and PD (2.0–3.0 mm) were found. After 5 years no implant was lost. Three crowns and one abutment screw were defective and replaced. Implant survival (1 failure/114) as well as minimal peri-implant bone loss confirmed the favorable outcome of the used implant line. Five years post-loading, crestal bone stabilized slightly below the machined/rough border. Full article
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Article
Factors Associated with Edentulism among Adult Users of Public Oral Health Services in Victoria, Australia
Dent. J. 2014, 2(4), 98-105; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/dj2040098 - 05 Nov 2014
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 3076
Abstract
This study examined edentulism (total absence of natural dentition) trends among adults’ users of public oral health care in Victoria, Australia and factors associated with these trends. The sample comprised 13,578 dental clients of public oral health care services, collected between July 2008 [...] Read more.
This study examined edentulism (total absence of natural dentition) trends among adults’ users of public oral health care in Victoria, Australia and factors associated with these trends. The sample comprised 13,578 dental clients of public oral health care services, collected between July 2008 and June 2009, from which data were complete. The group of edentulous clients represented 6.8% of all clients. Older participants were more likely to be edentulous (OR = 3.95; 95% CI 3.53–4.43). By language spoken at home, those who spoke English were more likely to be edentulous than those who spoke other languages (OR = 1.29; 95% CI 1.02–1.63). Aboriginal clients were more likely to be edentulous than non-Aboriginal clients (OR = 2.21; 95% CI 1.15–4.27). By region of residence, clients living in rural locations were more likely to be edentulous than those living in urban regions (OR = 1.53; 95% CI 1.32–1.78). The full model explained 16.8% of the variance in being edentulous. Findings in edentulism were lower than what was reported by the National Survey of Adult Oral Health. However, despite this trend, significant variations existed across urban and rural locations. Innovative public health programs and services are essential to prevent inequalities in oral health diseases and conditions for rural populations. Full article
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