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Article

Psychometric Properties of the Greek Version of the Medical Office on Patient Safety Culture in Primary Care Settings

1
Faculty of Medicine, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Rimini 1 Chaidari, 124 62 Athens, Greece
2
Faculty of Social & Political Sciences, University of Peloponnese, 201 00 Corinth, Greece
3
Laboratory of Hygiene, Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, University of Athens Medical School, 115 27 Athens, Greece
4
Endocrine and Metabolic Bone Disorders Unit, 2nd Department of Internal Medicine and Research Institute and Diabetes Center, Attikon University Hospital, 124 62 Athens, Greece
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Hiroshi Sakagami
Received: 16 June 2021 / Revised: 7 July 2021 / Accepted: 18 July 2021 / Published: 26 July 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue PROTAC—From Bench to Bed)
Background: Safety culture is considered one of the most crucial premises for further development of patient care in healthcare. During the eight-year economic crisis (2010–2018), Greece made significant reforms in the way the primary health care system operates, aiming at the more efficient operation of the system without degrading issues of safety and quality of the provided health services. In this context, this study aims to validate a specialized tool—the Medical Office Survey on Patient Safety Culture (MOSPSC)—developed by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) to evaluate primary care settings in terms of safety culture and quality. Methods: Factor analysis determined the correlation of the factor structure in Greek data with the original questionnaire. The relation of the factor analysis with the Cronbach’s coefficient alpha was also determined, including the construct validity. Results: Eight composites with 34 items were extracted by exploratory factor analysis, with acceptable Cronbach’s alpha coefficients and good construct validity. Consequently, the composites jointly explained 62% of the variance in the responses. Five items were removed from the original version of the questionnaire. As a result, three out of the eight composites were a mixture of items from different compounds of the original tool. The composition of the five factors was similar to that in the original questionnaire. Conclusions: The MOSPSC tool in Greek primary healthcare settings can be used to assess patient safety culture in facilities across the country. From the study, the patient safety culture in Greece was positive, although few composites showed a negative correlation and needed improvement. View Full-Text
Keywords: patient safety culture; factor analysis; primary care patient safety culture; factor analysis; primary care
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MDPI and ACS Style

Antonakos, I.; Souliotis, K.; Psaltopoulou, T.; Tountas, Y.; Papaefstathiou, A.; Kantzanou, M. Psychometric Properties of the Greek Version of the Medical Office on Patient Safety Culture in Primary Care Settings. Medicines 2021, 8, 42. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/medicines8080042

AMA Style

Antonakos I, Souliotis K, Psaltopoulou T, Tountas Y, Papaefstathiou A, Kantzanou M. Psychometric Properties of the Greek Version of the Medical Office on Patient Safety Culture in Primary Care Settings. Medicines. 2021; 8(8):42. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/medicines8080042

Chicago/Turabian Style

Antonakos, Ioannis, Kyriakos Souliotis, Theodora Psaltopoulou, Yannis Tountas, Athanasios Papaefstathiou, and Maria Kantzanou. 2021. "Psychometric Properties of the Greek Version of the Medical Office on Patient Safety Culture in Primary Care Settings" Medicines 8, no. 8: 42. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/medicines8080042

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