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Frailty in Primary Care: Validation of the simplified Zulfiqar Frailty Scale (sZFS)
Brief Report

Validation of the Zulfiqar Frailty Scale (ZFS): A New Tool for General Practitioners

Service de Médecine Interne, Diabète et Maladies Métaboliques de la Clinique Médicale B, Hôpitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg et Equipe EA 3072 “Mitochondrie, Stress Oxydant et Protection Musculaire”, Faculté de Médecine—Université de Strasbourg, 67000 Strasbourg, France
Academic Editor: Emmanuel Andrès
Received: 15 August 2021 / Revised: 28 August 2021 / Accepted: 2 September 2021 / Published: 4 September 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Frailty Syndrome in the Elderly: a Real Challenge for Our Society)
Introduction: The early detection of frailty, a frequent transient state that can be reversible in the elderly and is responsible for significant morbidity and mortality, helps prevent complications from it. Objective: To evaluate the performance of the “ZFS” tool to screen for frailty as defined SEGA scale criteria in an ambulatory population of patients at least 65 years of age. Methods: A prospective non-interventional study conducted in Alsace for a duration of six months that included patients aged 65 and over, judged to be autonomous with an ADL > 4/6. Results: In this ambulatory population of 102 patients with an average age of 76 years, frailty, according to modified SEGA criteria grid A, had a prevalence of 19.6%. Frailty, according to the “ZFS” tool, had a prevalence of 35.0%, and all of its elements except weight loss were significantly associated with frailty. Its threshold for identifying frailty is three criteria out of six. It was rapid (average completion time: 87 s), had a sensitivity of 100%, and a negative predictive value of 100%. Conclusions: The “ZFS” tool makes it possible to screen for frailty with a high level of sensitivity and a negative predictive value. View Full-Text
Keywords: ZULFIQAR Frailty Scale (ZFS); modified SEGA scale grid A; primary care; prevention; elderly subjects ZULFIQAR Frailty Scale (ZFS); modified SEGA scale grid A; primary care; prevention; elderly subjects
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MDPI and ACS Style

Zulfiqar, A.-A. Validation of the Zulfiqar Frailty Scale (ZFS): A New Tool for General Practitioners. Medicines 2021, 8, 52. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/medicines8090052

AMA Style

Zulfiqar A-A. Validation of the Zulfiqar Frailty Scale (ZFS): A New Tool for General Practitioners. Medicines. 2021; 8(9):52. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/medicines8090052

Chicago/Turabian Style

Zulfiqar, Abrar-Ahmad. 2021. "Validation of the Zulfiqar Frailty Scale (ZFS): A New Tool for General Practitioners" Medicines 8, no. 9: 52. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/medicines8090052

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