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Potentials and Pitfalls on the Use of Passion Fruit By-Products in Drinkable Yogurt: Physicochemical, Technological, Microbiological, and Sensory Aspects

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Department of Agri-Food Industry, Food and Nutrition, “Luiz de Queiroz” College of Agriculture, University of São Paulo, Av. Pádua Dias 11, P.O. Box 9, CEP 13418-900 Piracicaba, SP, Brazil
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Department of Food Science and Technology, State University of Londrina, Rod. Celso Garcia Cid, PR 445, km 380, Campus Universitário, P.O. Box 10.011, 86057-970 Londrina, PR, Brazil
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Marine Institute, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John’s, NL A1C 5R3, Canada
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Department of Food Engineering, State University of Ponta Grossa, Av. Bonifácio Viléla, Centro, CEP 84010-330 Ponta Grossa, PR, Brazil
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 18 May 2018 / Revised: 11 June 2018 / Accepted: 6 July 2018 / Published: 8 July 2018
Peels and seeds are the primary by-products of the passion fruit agroindustry. This study was designed to evaluate the potential of passion fruit peel and seeds flour (PFF) as a source of fiber and minerals to enhance the functional properties of drinkable yogurt. Proximate composition, mineral content, technological (pH, viscosity, color, and syneresis), and microbiological analyses (lactic acid bacteria, as well as yeast and mold counts), acceptance test, descriptive sensory analysis, and shelf life assessments were analyzed. Drinkable yogurts fortified with PFF showed higher fiber levels (both soluble and insoluble) and mineral content (potassium, magnesium, and manganese). Incorporation of PFF increased the viscosity and promoted changes in the color parameters of yogurts. During storage, the pH and the number of viable lactic acid bacteria decreased while the syneresis and yeast and mold counts increased. The shelf life of drinkable yogurts was estimated to be 21 days. Regarding sensorial aspects, drinkable yogurt fortified with 2% of PFF was considered the most viable product for market exploitation. The present contribution indicates that the use of passion fruit by-products in the development of drinkable yogurts is a viable alternative which can be explored for nutritional, technological, and sensory purposes by the food industry. View Full-Text
Keywords: passion fruit; fibers; mineral content; sensory evaluation; food waste; residues passion fruit; fibers; mineral content; sensory evaluation; food waste; residues
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MDPI and ACS Style

De Toledo, N.M.V.; De Camargo, A.C.; Ramos, P.B.M.; Button, D.C.; Granato, D.; Canniatti-Brazaca, S.G. Potentials and Pitfalls on the Use of Passion Fruit By-Products in Drinkable Yogurt: Physicochemical, Technological, Microbiological, and Sensory Aspects. Beverages 2018, 4, 47. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/beverages4030047

AMA Style

De Toledo NMV, De Camargo AC, Ramos PBM, Button DC, Granato D, Canniatti-Brazaca SG. Potentials and Pitfalls on the Use of Passion Fruit By-Products in Drinkable Yogurt: Physicochemical, Technological, Microbiological, and Sensory Aspects. Beverages. 2018; 4(3):47. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/beverages4030047

Chicago/Turabian Style

De Toledo, Nataly M.V.; De Camargo, Adriano C.; Ramos, Paula B.M.; Button, David C.; Granato, Daniel; Canniatti-Brazaca, Solange G. 2018. "Potentials and Pitfalls on the Use of Passion Fruit By-Products in Drinkable Yogurt: Physicochemical, Technological, Microbiological, and Sensory Aspects" Beverages 4, no. 3: 47. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/beverages4030047

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