Next Article in Journal / Special Issue
The Inoculation of Probiotics In Vivo Is a Challenge: Strategies to Improve Their Survival, to Avoid Unpleasant Changes, or to Enhance Their Performances in Beverages
Previous Article in Journal / Special Issue
Membrane-Based Operations in the Fruit Juice Processing Industry: A Review
Review

White Wine Protein Instability: Mechanism, Quality Control and Technological Alternatives for Wine Stabilisation—An Overview

1
CQ-VR, Chemistry Research Centre-Vila Real, Food and Wine Chemistry Lab., School of Life Sciences and Environment, University of Trás-os-Montes and Alto Douro, 5000-801 Vila Real, Portugal
2
Centro de Investigação de Montanha (CIMO), ESA-Polytechnic Institute of Bragança, Campus de Santa Apolónia, 5300-253 Bragança, Portugal
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 7 January 2020 / Revised: 7 February 2020 / Accepted: 9 March 2020 / Published: 17 March 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Wide World of Beverage Research: Reviews of Current Topics)
Wine protein instability depends on several factors, but wine grape proteins are the main haze factors, being mainly caused by pathogenesis-related proteins (thaumatin-like proteins and chitinases) with a molecular weight between 10~40 kDa and an isoelectric point below six. Wine protein stability tests are needed for the routine control of this wine instability, and to select the best technological approach to remove the unstable proteins. The heat test is the most used, with good correlation with the natural proteins’ precipitations and because high temperatures are the main protein instability factor after wine bottling. Many products and technological solutions have been studied in recent years; however, sodium bentonite is still the most efficient and used treatment to remove unstable proteins from white wines. This overview resumes and discusses the different aspects involved in wine protein instability, from the wine protein instability mechanisms, the protein stability tests used, and technological alternatives available to stabilise wines with protein instability problems. View Full-Text
Keywords: wine protein; wine haze; pathogenesis-related proteins; protein stability tests; protein stability treatments wine protein; wine haze; pathogenesis-related proteins; protein stability tests; protein stability treatments
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

MDPI and ACS Style

Cosme, F.; Fernandes, C.; Ribeiro, T.; Filipe-Ribeiro, L.; Nunes, F.M. White Wine Protein Instability: Mechanism, Quality Control and Technological Alternatives for Wine Stabilisation—An Overview. Beverages 2020, 6, 19. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/beverages6010019

AMA Style

Cosme F, Fernandes C, Ribeiro T, Filipe-Ribeiro L, Nunes FM. White Wine Protein Instability: Mechanism, Quality Control and Technological Alternatives for Wine Stabilisation—An Overview. Beverages. 2020; 6(1):19. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/beverages6010019

Chicago/Turabian Style

Cosme, Fernanda, Conceição Fernandes, Tânia Ribeiro, Luís Filipe-Ribeiro, and Fernando M. Nunes 2020. "White Wine Protein Instability: Mechanism, Quality Control and Technological Alternatives for Wine Stabilisation—An Overview" Beverages 6, no. 1: 19. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/beverages6010019

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop