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Article

Perception of Aqueous Ethanol Binary Mixtures Containing Alcohol-Relevant Taste and Chemesthetic Stimuli

by 1 and 1,2,3,4,5,*
1
Department of Biological Sciences, Brock University, St. Catharines, ON L2S 3A1, Canada
2
Cool Climate Oenology and Viticulture Institute, Brock University, St. Catharines, ON L2S 3A1, Canada
3
Department of Psychology, Brock University, St. Catharines, ON L2S 3A1, Canada
4
National Wine and Grape Industry Centre, Charles Sturt University, Wagga Wagga, NSW 2678, Australia
5
Sustainability Research Centre, University of the Sunshine Coast, Sippy Downs, QLD 4556, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Laura Vázquez-Araújo
Received: 8 April 2021 / Revised: 21 April 2021 / Accepted: 23 April 2021 / Published: 29 April 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers in Sensory Analysis of Beverages Section)
Ethanol is a complex stimulus that elicits multiple gustatory and chemesthetic sensations. Alcoholic beverages also contain other tastants that impact flavour. Here, we sought to characterize the binary interactions between ethanol and four stimuli representing the dominant orosensations elicited in alcoholic beverages: fructose (sweet), quinine (bitter), tartaric acid (sour) and aluminium sulphate (astringent). Female participants were screened for thermal taste status to determine whether the heightened orosensory responsiveness of thermal tasters (n = 21–22) compared to thermal non-tasters (n = 13–15) extends to these binary mixtures. Participants rated the intensity of five orosensations in binary solutions of ethanol (5%, 13%, 23%) and a tastant (low, medium, high). For each tastant, 3-way ANOVAs determined which factors impacted orosensory ratings. Burning/tingling increased as ethanol concentration increased in all four binary mixture types and was not impacted by the concentration of other stimuli. In contrast, bitterness increased with ethanol concentration, and decreased with increasing fructose concentration. Sourness tended to be reduced as ethanol concentration increased, although astringency intensity decreased with increasing concentration of fructose. Overall, thermal tasters tended to be more responsive than thermal non-tasters. These results provide insights into how the taste and chemesthetic profiles of alcoholic beverages across a wide range of ethanol concentrations can be manipulated by changing their composition. View Full-Text
Keywords: thermal taste; taste interactions; taste suppression; individual differences; beer; wine; spirits; alcoholic beverages; binary mixtures thermal taste; taste interactions; taste suppression; individual differences; beer; wine; spirits; alcoholic beverages; binary mixtures
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MDPI and ACS Style

Thibodeau, M.; Pickering, G. Perception of Aqueous Ethanol Binary Mixtures Containing Alcohol-Relevant Taste and Chemesthetic Stimuli. Beverages 2021, 7, 23. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/beverages7020023

AMA Style

Thibodeau M, Pickering G. Perception of Aqueous Ethanol Binary Mixtures Containing Alcohol-Relevant Taste and Chemesthetic Stimuli. Beverages. 2021; 7(2):23. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/beverages7020023

Chicago/Turabian Style

Thibodeau, Margaret, and Gary Pickering. 2021. "Perception of Aqueous Ethanol Binary Mixtures Containing Alcohol-Relevant Taste and Chemesthetic Stimuli" Beverages 7, no. 2: 23. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/beverages7020023

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