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Geriatrics, Volume 6, Issue 1 (March 2021) – 33 articles

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Review
Deterioration, Compensation and Motor Control Processes in Healthy Aging, Mild Cognitive Impairment and Alzheimer’s Disease
Geriatrics 2021, 6(1), 33; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/geriatrics6010033 - 23 Mar 2021
Viewed by 905
Abstract
Aging is associated with modifications of several brain structures and functions. These modifications then manifest as modified behaviors. It has been proposed that some brain function modifications may compensate for some other deteriorated ones, thus maintaining behavioral performance. Through the concept of compensation [...] Read more.
Aging is associated with modifications of several brain structures and functions. These modifications then manifest as modified behaviors. It has been proposed that some brain function modifications may compensate for some other deteriorated ones, thus maintaining behavioral performance. Through the concept of compensation versus deterioration, this article reviews the literature on motor function in healthy and pathological aging. We first highlight mechanistic studies that used paradigms, allowing us to identify precise compensation mechanisms in healthy aging. Subsequently, we review studies investigating motor function in two often-associated neurological conditions, i.e., mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer’s disease. We point out the need to expand the knowledge gained from descriptive studies with studies targeting specific motor control processes. Teasing apart deteriorated versus compensating processes represents precious knowledge that could significantly improve the prevention and rehabilitation of age-related loss of mobility. Full article
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Article
Assessing the Determinants of the Wish to Die among the Elderly Population in Ghana
Geriatrics 2021, 6(1), 32; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/geriatrics6010032 - 23 Mar 2021
Viewed by 709
Abstract
Background: A wish to die is common in elderly people. Concerns about death wishes among the elderly have risen in Ghana, where the ageing transition is comparable to other low-and middle-income countries. However, nationally representative research on death wishes in the elderly in [...] Read more.
Background: A wish to die is common in elderly people. Concerns about death wishes among the elderly have risen in Ghana, where the ageing transition is comparable to other low-and middle-income countries. However, nationally representative research on death wishes in the elderly in the country is not readily available. Our study aimed to assess the determinants of the wish to die among the elderly in Ghana. Methods: We analysed data from the World Health Organisation Global Ageing and Adult Health Survey, Wave 1 (2007–2008) for Ghana. Data on the wish to die, socio-demographic profiles, health factors and substance abuse were retrieved from 2147 respondents aged 65 and above. Ages of respondents were categorised as 65–74 years; 75–84 years; 85+ to reflect the main stages of ageing. Logistic regression models were fitted to assess the association between these factors and the wish to die. Results: Age, sex, place of residence, education, body mass index, hypertension, stroke, alcohol consumption, tobacco use, income, diabetes, visual impairment, hopelessness and depression had statistically significant associations with a wish to die. Older age cohorts (75–84 and 85+) were more likely to have the wish to die (AOR = 1.05, CI = 1.02–1.16; AOR = 1.48, CI = 1.22–1.94), compared to younger age cohorts (65–74 years). Persons who felt hopeless had higher odds (AOR = 2.15, CI = 2.11–2.20) of experiencing the wish to die as compared to those who were hopeful. Conclusions: In view of the relationship between socio-demographic (i.e., age, sex, education and employment), hopelessness, anthropometric (body mass index), other health factors and the wish to die among the elderly in Ghana, specific biopsychosocial health promotion programmes, including timely identification of persons at risk, for appropriate intervention (e.g., psychotherapy, interpersonal support, alcohol-tobacco cessation therapy, clinical help) to promote their wish for a longer life is needed. Full article
Article
Virtual Group Exercises and Psychological Status among Community-Dwelling Older Adults during the COVID-19 Pandemic—A Feasibility Study
Geriatrics 2021, 6(1), 31; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/geriatrics6010031 - 22 Mar 2021
Viewed by 880
Abstract
Social isolation, magnified by the restriction of movement order during the COVID-19 pandemic, may lead to negative psychosocial health impacts among community-dwelling older adults. We, therefore, aimed to evaluate recruitment rates, data collection, and group exercises conducted through virtual technology among individuals aged [...] Read more.
Social isolation, magnified by the restriction of movement order during the COVID-19 pandemic, may lead to negative psychosocial health impacts among community-dwelling older adults. We, therefore, aimed to evaluate recruitment rates, data collection, and group exercises conducted through virtual technology among individuals aged 60 years and over in Malaysia. Participants were recruited from the Promoting Independence in Seniors with Arthritis (PISA) pilot cohort through social media messaging. A four-week course of virtual group exercise was offered. Anxiety and depression were assessed with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) during the last attended follow-up of the cohort study (pre-pandemic), pre-intervention, and post-intervention. Exercise adherence was recorded using diaries with daily entries and attendance to the virtual group exercise sessions were also captured electronically daily. The outcomes of interest were changes in anxiety and depression scores from baseline to pre-intervention (pandemic-related) and post-intervention (virtual exercise related). Forty-three individuals were recruited. A significant increase in anxiety scores from baseline to pre-intervention was observed. Comparisons using repeated-measures analysis of variance between those who attendance ≥14 and <14 group exercise sessions revealed no between-within subject differences in depression scores. There was a 23% dropout rate in the post intervention survey and 60.5% of diaries were returned. Virtual group exercises could be conducted among older adults residing in a middle-income country, though recruitment would have been limited to those with internet access. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue SARS-CoV-2 Infections in the Elderly)
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Article
Rapid Support for Older Adults during the Initial Stages of the COVID-19 Pandemic: Results from a Geriatric Psychiatry Helpline
Geriatrics 2021, 6(1), 30; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/geriatrics6010030 - 22 Mar 2021
Viewed by 631
Abstract
Background. The COVID-19 pandemic and governmental lockdown measures disproportionally impact older adults. This study presents the results from a psychiatric helpline for older adults in Mannheim, Germany, during the lockdown, set up to provide information and psychosocial support. We aim to elucidate the [...] Read more.
Background. The COVID-19 pandemic and governmental lockdown measures disproportionally impact older adults. This study presents the results from a psychiatric helpline for older adults in Mannheim, Germany, during the lockdown, set up to provide information and psychosocial support. We aim to elucidate the needs of older adults, their reported changes, and the psychological impact during the initial stages of the health crisis. Methods: A total of 55 older adults called the psychiatric helpline between April and June 2020. Information on demographics, medical and psychiatric history. as well as changes in daily life due to the pandemic was collected anonymously. Mental health status was assessed using the 7-Item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD-7) and the Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HAM-A). Results: Most callers were women, older adults (M = 74.69 years), single, and retired. In total, 69% of callers reported new or an increase in psychiatric symptoms, with anxiety and depressive symptoms being the most common ones. Age was significantly negatively correlated to higher levels of anxiety and depression symptoms. Individuals with a previous diagnosis of a psychiatric disease reported significantly higher levels of depressive and anxiety symptoms than those without a diagnosis. Conclusion: In older adults, the perceived psychological impact of the COVID-19 crisis appears to ameliorate with age. Individuals with a history of psychiatric disease are most vulnerable to negative mental health outcomes. Rapid response in the form of a geriatric helpline is a useful initiative to support the psychosocial needs of older adults during a health crisis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Section Geriatric Psychiatry and Psychology)
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Article
The DWQ-EMR Embedded Tool to Enhance the Family Physician-Caregiver Connection: A Pilot Case Study
Geriatrics 2021, 6(1), 29; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/geriatrics6010029 - 21 Mar 2021
Viewed by 785
Abstract
The number of family caregivers to individuals with dementia is increasing. Family physicians are often the first point of access to the health care system for individuals with dementia and their caregivers. Caregivers are at an increased risk of developing negative physical, cognitive [...] Read more.
The number of family caregivers to individuals with dementia is increasing. Family physicians are often the first point of access to the health care system for individuals with dementia and their caregivers. Caregivers are at an increased risk of developing negative physical, cognitive and affective health problems themselves. Caregivers also describe having unmet needs to help them sustain care in the community. Family physicians are in a unique position to help support caregivers and individuals with dementia, but often struggle with keeping up with best practice dementia service knowledge. The Dementia Wellness Questionnaire was designed to serve as a starting point for discussions between caregivers and family physicians by empowering caregivers to communicate their needs and concerns and to enhance family physicians’ access to specific dementia support information. The DWQ aims to alert physicians of caregiver and patient needs. This pilot study aimed to explore the experiences of physicians and caregivers of people using the Questionnaire in two family medicine clinics in Ontario, Canada. Interviews with physicians and caregivers collected data on their experiences using the DWQ following a 10-month data gathering period. Data was analyzed using content analysis. Results indicated that family physicians may have an improved efficacy in managing dementia by having dementia care case specific guidelines integrated within electronic medical records. By having time-efficient access to tailored supports, family physicians can better address the needs of the caregiver–patient dyad and help support family caregivers in their caregiving role. Caregivers expressed that the Questionnaire helped them remember concerns to bring up with physicians, in order to receive help in a more efficient manner. Full article
Article
Association between Levels of Physical Activity, Sarcopenia, Type 2 Diabetes and the Quality of Life of Elderly People in Community Dwellings in Lebanon
Geriatrics 2021, 6(1), 28; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/geriatrics6010028 - 18 Mar 2021
Viewed by 799
Abstract
There is a lack of data from developing countries on the link between physical activity (PA) on health outcomes. This study examines the association between the level of PA and sarcopenia, cardiovascular risk factors (i.e., dyslipidemia, type 2 diabetes (T2D), and cardiovascular diseases), [...] Read more.
There is a lack of data from developing countries on the link between physical activity (PA) on health outcomes. This study examines the association between the level of PA and sarcopenia, cardiovascular risk factors (i.e., dyslipidemia, type 2 diabetes (T2D), and cardiovascular diseases), and the health-related quality of life (HRQoL) among elderly people, in community dwellings in Lebanon. In this cross-sectional, observational study, body composition, levels of PA, and the HRQoL of 243 elderly people living in community dwellings, are obtained. The participants are then categorized based on a PA cut-off point of 600 metabolic equivalent task minutes per week (MET-min/week). In our sample, the prevalence of physical inactivity, defined as performing less than 600 MET-min/week, is 51.44% (125/243 participants).They displayed a higher prevalence of sarcopenia (36.0% vs. 18.6%), T2D (39.6% vs. 21.1%), as well as a lower physical (65.67 ± 20.72 vs. 75.08 ± 17.29) and mental (67.58 ± 21.51 vs. 76.95 ± 17.16) HRQoL. On the other hand, regression analysis shows that an increased rate of PA to ≥600 MET-min/week is associated with a lower risk of T2D (OR = 0.43, 95% CI: 0.22–0.84, p = 0.013) and sarcopenia (OR= 0.40, 95% CI: 0.22–0.73, p = 0.003) by 60%, and higher scores of the physical (β = −7.65; −11.87, −3.43, p = 0.0004) and mental (β = −8.47; −13.08, −3.85, p = 0.0004) HRQoL by nearly eight points. Our results show a high prevalence of physical inactivity in Lebanese adults over the age of 60; however, an adequate level of PA among this population seemed to be associated with a lower risk of sarcopenia and T2D, as well as a better HRQoL. However, future longitudinal studies are still needed to clarify if intervention based on increasing levels of PA can determine improvement in these clinical outcomes. If this is shown to be the case, it emphasizes the importance of implementing strategies to increase physical activity within this population. Full article
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Article
It Makes You Feel That You Are There”: Exploring the Acceptability of Virtual Reality Nature Environments for People with Memory Loss
Geriatrics 2021, 6(1), 27; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/geriatrics6010027 - 12 Mar 2021
Viewed by 869
Abstract
Aim: To report on the acceptability of virtual reality (VR) nature environments for people with memory loss at memory cafes, and explore the experiences and perceptions of carers and staff. Methods: A qualitative study was conducted between January and March 2019. Ten adults [...] Read more.
Aim: To report on the acceptability of virtual reality (VR) nature environments for people with memory loss at memory cafes, and explore the experiences and perceptions of carers and staff. Methods: A qualitative study was conducted between January and March 2019. Ten adults with memory loss, eight carers and six volunteer staff were recruited from two memory cafes, located in Cornwall, UK. There were 19 VR sessions which were audio recorded and all participants were interviewed at the end of the sessions. Framework analysis was used to identify patterns and themes in the data. Results: During the VR experience, participants were engaged to varying degrees, with engagement facilitated by the researcher, and in some cases, with the help of a carer. Participants responded positively to the nature scenes, finding them soothing and evoking memories. The VR experience was positive; many felt immersed in nature and saw it as an opportunity to ‘go somewhere’. However, it was not always positive and for a few, it could be ‘strange’. Participants reflected on their experience of the VR equipment, and volunteer staff and carers also shared their perceptions of VR for people with dementia in long-term care settings. Conclusions: The VR nature experience was an opportunity for people with memory loss to be immersed in nature and offered the potential to enhance their quality of life. Future work should build on lessons learned and continue to work with people with dementia in developing and implementing VR technology in long-term care settings. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cognitive Aging and Cognitive Impairment 2021)
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Article
Differences in Hospital Costs among Octogenarians and Nonagenarians Following Primary Total Joint Arthroplasty
Geriatrics 2021, 6(1), 26; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/geriatrics6010026 - 09 Mar 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 510
Abstract
The proportion of patients over the age of 90 years continues to grow, and the anticipated demand for total joint arthroplasty (TJA) in this population is expected to rise concomitantly. As the country shifts to alternative reimbursement models, data regarding hospital expenses is [...] Read more.
The proportion of patients over the age of 90 years continues to grow, and the anticipated demand for total joint arthroplasty (TJA) in this population is expected to rise concomitantly. As the country shifts to alternative reimbursement models, data regarding hospital expenses is needed for accurate risk-adjusted stratification. The aim of this study was to compare total in-hospital costs following primary TJA in octogenarians and nonagenarians, and to determine the primary drivers of cost. This was a retrospective analysis from a single institution in the U.S. We used time-drive activity-based costing (TDABC) to capture granular total hospital costs for each patient. 889 TJA’s were included in the study, with 841 octogenarians and 48 nonagenarians. Nonagenarians were more likely to undergo total hip arthroplasty (THA) (70.8% vs. 42.4%; p < 0.0001), had higher ASA classification (2.6 vs. 2.4; p = 0.049), and were more often privately insured (35.4% vs. 27.8%; p = 0.0001) as compared to octogenarians. Nonagenarians were more often discharged to skilled nursing facilities (56.2% vs. 37.5%; p = 0.0011), experienced longer operating room (OR) time (142 vs. 133; p = 0.0201) and length of stay (3.7 vs. 3.1; p = 0.0003), and had higher implant and total in-hospital costs (p < 0.0001 and 0.0001). Multivariate linear regression showed implant cost (0.700; p < 0.0001), length of stay (0.546; p < 0.0001), and OR time (0.288; p < 0.0001) to be the strongest associations with overall costs. Primary TJA for nonagenarians was more expensive than octogenarians. Targeting implant costs, length of stay, and OR time can reduce costs for nonagenarians in order to provide cost-effective value-based care. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Joint Arthroplasty in the Oldest People)
Article
COVID-19 Infection among Older People Admitted to Hospital: A Cross-Sectional Analysis
Geriatrics 2021, 6(1), 25; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/geriatrics6010025 - 08 Mar 2021
Viewed by 713
Abstract
(1) Background: Older people with COVID-19 infection report worse clinical outcomes. There is a paucity of local data and this study aimed to describe the clinical progression of older people admitted to a university hospital in Malaysia with COVID-19 infection. (2) Methods: Older [...] Read more.
(1) Background: Older people with COVID-19 infection report worse clinical outcomes. There is a paucity of local data and this study aimed to describe the clinical progression of older people admitted to a university hospital in Malaysia with COVID-19 infection. (2) Methods: Older people (≥60 years) admitted with COVID-19 infection confirmed with RT-PCR from 27 February 2020–25 May 2020 were included in this study. Data on patient characteristics, hospital treatment, and inpatient outcomes were collected via hospital-held electronic medical records. Analysis was done to describe the cohort and identify factors associated with inpatient mortality. (3) Results: 26 participants were included (mean age 76.2 years, female 57.7%). All had at least one comorbid condition and half were frail. About 19.2% had non-respiratory (atypical) symptoms; 23.1% had a severe disease that required intensive care unit monitoring; 46.2% were given COVID-19 targeted therapy. Inpatient mortality and overall complication rates were 23.1% and 42.3%, respectively. Delirium on presentation and lower Ct-value were associated with mortality. (4) Conclusions: Older people with COVID-19 infection have severe infection and poor hospital outcomes. Vigilant hospital care is necessary to address their multimorbidity and frailty, along with appropriate treatment for their infection. Full article
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Article
The Social Vulnerability Index, Mortality and Disability in Mexican Middle-Aged and Older Adults
Geriatrics 2021, 6(1), 24; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/geriatrics6010024 - 08 Mar 2021
Viewed by 683
Abstract
The social vulnerability index (SVI) independently predicts mortality and others adverse outcomes across different populations. There is no evidence that the SVI can predict adverse outcomes in individuals living in countries with high social vulnerability such as Latin America. The aim of this [...] Read more.
The social vulnerability index (SVI) independently predicts mortality and others adverse outcomes across different populations. There is no evidence that the SVI can predict adverse outcomes in individuals living in countries with high social vulnerability such as Latin America. The aim of this study was to analyze the association of the SVI with mortality and disability in Mexican middle-aged and older adults. This is a longitudinal study with a follow-up of 47 months, the Mexican Health and Aging Study, including people over the age of 40 years. A SVI was calculated using 42 items stratified in three categories low (<0.36), medium (0.36–0.47), and high (>0.47) vulnerability. We examined the association of SVI with three-year mortality and incident disability. Cox and logistic regression models were fitted to test these associations. We included 14,217 participants (58.4% women) with a mean age of 63.9 years (±SD 10.1). The mean SVI was of 0.42 (±SD 0.12). Mortality rate at three years was 6% (n = 809) and incident disability was 13.2% (n = 1367). SVI was independently associated with mortality, with a HR of 1.4 (95% CI 1.1–1.8, p < 0.001) for the highest category of the SVI compared to the lowest. Regarding disability, the OR was 1.3 (95% CI 1.1–1.5, p = 0.026) when comparing the highest and the lowest levels of the SVI. The SVI was independently associated with mortality and disability. Our findings support previous evidence on the SVI and builds on how this association persists even in those individuals with underlying contextual social vulnerability. Full article
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Article
Cemented Dual Mobility Cup for Primary Total Hip Arthroplasty in Elder Patients with High-Risk Instability
Geriatrics 2021, 6(1), 23; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/geriatrics6010023 - 07 Mar 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 625
Abstract
Several studies have shown that double mobility (DM) cups reduce postoperative dislocations. Does the cemented dual mobility cup reduce dislocations in a specific cohort of elder patients with a high dislocation risk? Our hypothesis is that this implant is optimal for elder patients [...] Read more.
Several studies have shown that double mobility (DM) cups reduce postoperative dislocations. Does the cemented dual mobility cup reduce dislocations in a specific cohort of elder patients with a high dislocation risk? Our hypothesis is that this implant is optimal for elder patients because it reduces early dislocation. We have retrospectively reviewed elder patients who underwent total hip arthroplasty (THA) with cemented double mobility cup between March 2009 and January 2018. The inclusion criteria were patients (>75 years) who were operated on for primary THA (osteoarthritis or necrosis) with a cemented dual mobility cup and a high-risk instability (at least two patient-dependent risk factors for instability). The exclusion criteria were revision surgeries or hip fracture. In all the cases, the same surgical approach was performed with a Watson Jones modified approach in supine position. We have collected demographic data, instability risk factors. Patients were classified using the Devane’s score, Merle d’Aubigné score and the patient’s likelihood of falling with the Morse Fall Scale. Surgical and follow-up complications were collected from their medical history. Sixty-eight arthroplasties (68 patients) were included in the study. The median age was 81.7 years (SD 6.4), and the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) score showed a distribution: II 27.94%, III 63.24% and IV 8.82%. Devane’s score was less than five in all of the cases. At least two patient-dependent risk factors for instability (87% had three or more) were present in each case. The median follow-up time was 49.04 months (SD 22.6). Complications observed were two cases of infection and one case of aseptic loosening at 15 months which required revision surgery. We did not observe any prosthetic dislocation. The cemented dual mobility cup is an excellent surgical option on primary total hip arthroplasties for elder patients with high-risk instability. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Joint Arthroplasty in the Oldest People)
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Article
Cognitive Flexibility and Inhibition in Individuals with Age-Related Hearing Loss
Geriatrics 2021, 6(1), 22; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/geriatrics6010022 - 05 Mar 2021
Viewed by 731
Abstract
Growing evidence suggests alterations in cognitive control processes in individuals with varying degrees of age-related hearing loss (ARHL); however, alterations in those with unaided mild ARHL are understudied. The current study examined two cognitive control processes, cognitive flexibility, and inhibition, in 21 older [...] Read more.
Growing evidence suggests alterations in cognitive control processes in individuals with varying degrees of age-related hearing loss (ARHL); however, alterations in those with unaided mild ARHL are understudied. The current study examined two cognitive control processes, cognitive flexibility, and inhibition, in 21 older adults with unaided mild ARHL and 18 age- and education-matched normal hearing (NH) controls. All participants underwent comprehensive audiological and cognitive evaluations including Trail Making Test-B, Verbal Fluency, Stroop, and two Go/NoGo tasks. Group differences in cognitive flexibility and inhibition as well as associations between peripheral and central hearing ability and measures of cognitive flexibility and inhibition were investigated. Findings revealed that the ARHL group took significantly longer to complete the Stroop task and had higher error rates on NoGo trials on both Go/NoGo tasks relative to the NH controls. Additionally, poorer peripheral and central hearing were associated with poorer cognitive flexibility and inhibitory control. Our findings suggest slower and more inefficient inhibitory control in the mild ARHL group relative to the NH group and add to decades of research on the association between hearing and cognition. Full article
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Article
Long-Term Care Resident Awareness and Interest in Spasticity Treatments
Geriatrics 2021, 6(1), 21; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/geriatrics6010021 - 03 Mar 2021
Viewed by 565
Abstract
Spasticity is common in long-term care settings (affecting up to one in three residents), yet it remains under-treated despite safe and effective, Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved therapies. One barrier to treatment may be lack of awareness of available therapies for long-term care [...] Read more.
Spasticity is common in long-term care settings (affecting up to one in three residents), yet it remains under-treated despite safe and effective, Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved therapies. One barrier to treatment may be lack of awareness of available therapies for long-term care residents living with spasticity. A standardized spasticity treatment awareness and interest interview was conducted with 18 nursing home residents and 11 veterans’ home residents in this cross-sectional study. Veterans’ home residents were also asked about potential barriers to receiving spasticity treatment. Many residents across both long-term care facilities were unaware of most of the treatment options for spasticity. Participants were most aware of physical/occupational therapy (83%, 95% CI: 65–93%) and least aware of intrathecal baclofen (21%, 95% CI: 9–39%). After learning about treatments, only 7% of participants (95% CI: 0–23%) were not interested in receiving any form of spasticity treatment. Among residents previously unaware of spasticity treatments, at least one quarter became interested in receiving treatment and at least one-fifth indicated possibly being interested in the treatment after learning about it. Potential barriers to receiving treatment included traveling to see a doctor and limited knowledge of insurance coverage of spasticity treatments. These results suggest that patient-centered approaches, including education and discerning patient preferences, may improve spasticity treatment in long-term care settings. Full article
(This article belongs to the Section Geriatric Rehabilitation)
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Article
Potentially Inappropriate Medication Use and Hard Braking Events in Older Drivers
Geriatrics 2021, 6(1), 20; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/geriatrics6010020 - 20 Feb 2021
Viewed by 747
Abstract
Potentially inappropriate medications (PIMs) identified by the American Geriatrics Society should generally be avoided by older adults because of ineffectiveness or excess risk of adverse effects. Few studies have examined the effects of PIMs on driving safety measured by prospectively and objectively collected [...] Read more.
Potentially inappropriate medications (PIMs) identified by the American Geriatrics Society should generally be avoided by older adults because of ineffectiveness or excess risk of adverse effects. Few studies have examined the effects of PIMs on driving safety measured by prospectively and objectively collected driving data. Data for this study came from the Longitudinal Research on Aging Drivers study, a multisite naturalistic driving study of older adults. Multivariable negative binominal modeling was used to estimate incidence rate ratios and 95% confidence intervals of hard braking events (proxies for unsafe driving behavior defined as events with a deceleration rate ≥0.4 g) associated with PIM use among older drivers. The study sample consisted of 2932 drivers aged 65–79 years at baseline, including 542 (18.5%) who used at least one PIM. These drivers were followed through an in-vehicle recording device for up to 44 months. The overall incidence of hard braking events was 1.16 per 1000 miles. Use of PIMs was associated with a 10% increased risk of hard braking events. Compared to drivers who were not using PIMs, the risk of hard braking events increased 6% for those using one PIM, and 24% for those using two or more PIMs. Use of PIMs by older adult drivers is associated in a dose-response fashion with elevated risks of hard braking events. Reducing PIM use in older adults might help improve driving safety as well as health outcomes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Driving, Aging, Safety and Health)
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Exploring the Potential of Emerging Technologies to Meet the Care and Support Needs of Older People: A Delphi Survey
Geriatrics 2021, 6(1), 19; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/geriatrics6010019 - 13 Feb 2021
Viewed by 1075
Abstract
Some emerging technologies have potential to address older people’s care and support needs. However, there is still a gap in the knowledge on the potential uses of these technologies in some care domains. Therefore, a two-round Delphi survey was conducted to establish a [...] Read more.
Some emerging technologies have potential to address older people’s care and support needs. However, there is still a gap in the knowledge on the potential uses of these technologies in some care domains. Therefore, a two-round Delphi survey was conducted to establish a consensus of opinion from a group of health and social technology experts (n = 21) on the potential of 10 emerging technologies to meet older people’s needs in five care and support domains. Experts were also asked to provide reasons for their choices in free-text spaces. The consensus level was set at 70%. Free-text responses were analyzed using thematic analysis. Voice activated devices was the technology that reached experts consensus in all assessed care domains. Some technologies (e.g., Artificial intelligence (AI) enabled apps and wearables and Internet of things (IoT) enabled homes) also show potential to support basic self-care and access to healthcare needs of older people. However, most of the remaining technologies (e.g., robotics, exoskeletons, virtual and augmented reality (VR/AR)) face a range of technical and acceptability issues that may hinder their adoption by older people in the near future. Findings should encourage the R & D community to address some of the identified challenges to improve the adoption of emerging technologies by older people. Full article
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Article
The Seniors’ Community Hub: An Integrated Model of Care for the Identification and Management of Frailty in Primary Care
Geriatrics 2021, 6(1), 18; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/geriatrics6010018 - 12 Feb 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 722
Abstract
(1) Background: Integrated models of primary care deliver the comprehensive and preventative approach needed to identify and manage frailty in older people. Seniors’ Community Hub (SCH) was developed to deliver person-centered, evidence-informed, coordinated, and integrated care services to older community dwelling adults living [...] Read more.
(1) Background: Integrated models of primary care deliver the comprehensive and preventative approach needed to identify and manage frailty in older people. Seniors’ Community Hub (SCH) was developed to deliver person-centered, evidence-informed, coordinated, and integrated care services to older community dwelling adults living with frailty. This paper aims to describe the SCH model, and to present patient-oriented results of the pilot. (2) Methods: SCH was piloted in an academic clinic with six family physicians. Eligible patients were community dwelling, 65 years of age and older, and considered to be at risk of frailty (eFI > 0.12). Health professionals within the clinic received training in geriatrics and interprofessional teamwork to form the SCH team working with family physicians, patients and caregivers. The SCH intervention consisted of a team-based multi-domain assessment with person-centered care planning and follow-up. Patient-oriented outcomes (EQ-5D-5L and EQ-VAS) and 4-metre gait speed were measured at initial visit and 12 months later. (3) Results: 88 patients were enrolled in the pilot from April 2016–December 2018. No statistically significant differences in EQ-5D-5L/VAS or the 4-metre gait speed were detected in 38 patients completing the 12-month assessment. (4) Conclusions: Future larger scale studies of longer duration are needed to demonstrate impacts of integrated models of primary care on patient-oriented outcomes for older adults living with frailty. Full article
Article
Qualitative Research on the Primary Effect of Fish Pet Ownership Using the Bottleium, a Bottle-Type Aquarium, on Community-Dwelling Older Adults in Japan: A Potential Preventive Measure towards Social Isolation
Geriatrics 2021, 6(1), 17; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/geriatrics6010017 - 10 Feb 2021
Viewed by 1210
Abstract
Aging increases the risk of social isolation, which could lead to conditions such as depressive mood. Pet ownership is known to reduce social isolation. However, previous studies have mainly focused on mammals as pets, which could be difficult at old age. A small [...] Read more.
Aging increases the risk of social isolation, which could lead to conditions such as depressive mood. Pet ownership is known to reduce social isolation. However, previous studies have mainly focused on mammals as pets, which could be difficult at old age. A small ornamental fish is relatively easy to culture and might be a suitable alternative. In this research, we aimed to elucidate the possible effects of fish ownership on the psychological state of community-dwelling older adults in Japan. A Bottleium, a bottle-type aquarium, was selected to lower the burden of fish ownership. A workshop was hosted in 2019 and participants brought home their own Bottleium, with fish and water snail inside. Nineteen participants gave consent to the follow-up interview a month later. Five themes, “observation of fish and water snail”, “interaction between the fish and the owner”, “taking care of the fish as pet owner”, “facilitation of interpersonal interaction”, and “development of support system”, emerged from thematic analysis. The promotion of animal-to-human, and human-to-human interaction and development of responsibility could relate to a sense of social inclusion and ikigai-kan, a purpose of life. Fish ownership, when using equipment that suits the physical capability of older adults, could act as a positive stimulus. Full article
(This article belongs to the Section Healthy Aging)
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Article
Investigating On-Road Lane Maintenance and Speed Regulation in Post-Stroke Driving: A Pilot Case–Control Study
Geriatrics 2021, 6(1), 16; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/geriatrics6010016 - 09 Feb 2021
Viewed by 889
Abstract
Stroke can adversely affect the coordination and judgement of drivers due to executive dysfunction, which is relatively common in the post-stroke population but often undetected. Quantitatively examining vehicle control performance in post-stroke driving becomes essential to inspect whether and where post-stroke older drivers [...] Read more.
Stroke can adversely affect the coordination and judgement of drivers due to executive dysfunction, which is relatively common in the post-stroke population but often undetected. Quantitatively examining vehicle control performance in post-stroke driving becomes essential to inspect whether and where post-stroke older drivers are risky. To date, it is unclear as to which indicators, such as lane keeping or speed control, can differentiate the driving performance of post-stroke older drivers from that of normal (neurotypical) older drivers. By employing a case–control design using advanced vehicle movement tracking and analysis technology, this pilot study aimed to compare the variations in driving trajectory, lane keeping and speed control between the two groups of older drivers using spatial and statistical techniques. The results showed that the mean standard deviation of lane deviation (SDLD) in post-stroke participants was higher than that of normal participants in complex driving tasks (U-turn and left turn) but almost the same in simple driving tasks (straight line sections). No statistically significant differences were found in the speed control performance. The findings indicate that, although older drivers can still drive as they need to after a stroke, the decline in cognitive abilities still imposes a higher cognitive workload and more effort for post-stroke older drivers. Future studies can investigate post-stroke adults’ driving behaviour at more challenging driving scenarios or design driving intervention programs to improve their executive function in driving. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Driving, Aging, Safety and Health)
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Article
The Effect of High-Intensity Power Training on Habitual, Intervention and Total Physical Activity Levels in Older Adults with Type 2 Diabetes: Secondary Outcomes of the GREAT2DO Randomized Controlled Trial
Geriatrics 2021, 6(1), 15; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/geriatrics6010015 - 08 Feb 2021
Viewed by 934
Abstract
Background: We examined the effect of power training on habitual, intervention and total physical activity (PA) levels in older adults with type 2 diabetes and their relationship to metabolic control. Materials and Methods: 103 adults with type 2 diabetes were randomized to receive [...] Read more.
Background: We examined the effect of power training on habitual, intervention and total physical activity (PA) levels in older adults with type 2 diabetes and their relationship to metabolic control. Materials and Methods: 103 adults with type 2 diabetes were randomized to receive supervised power training or sham exercise three times/week for 12 months. Habitual, intervention, and total PA, as well as insulin resistance (HOMA2-IR) and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), were measured. Results: Participants were aged 67.9 ± 5.5 yrs, with well-controlled diabetes (HbA1c = 7.1%) and higher than average habitual PA levels compared to healthy peers. Habitual PA did not change significantly over 12 months (p = 0.74), and there was no effect of group assignment on change over time in habitual PA over 0–6 (p = 0.16) or 0–6–12 months (p = 0.51). By contrast, intervention PA, leg press tonnage and total PA increased over both 6- and 12-month timepoints (p = 0.0001), and these changes were significantly greater in the power training compared to the sham exercise group across timepoints (p = 0.0001). However, there were no associations between changes in any PA measures over time and changes in metabolic profile. Conclusion: Structured high-intensity power training may be an effective strategy to enhance overall PA in this high-risk cohort. Full article
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Article
Novel Variants in the CLCN1, RYR2, and DCTN1 Found in Elderly Japanese Dementia Patients: A Case Series
Geriatrics 2021, 6(1), 14; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/geriatrics6010014 - 07 Feb 2021
Viewed by 904
Abstract
Dementia has an enormous impact on medical and financial resources in aging societies like Japan. Diagnosis of dementia can be made by physical and mental examinations, imaging tests, and findings of high abnormal proteins in cerebrospinal fluids. In addition, genetic tests can be [...] Read more.
Dementia has an enormous impact on medical and financial resources in aging societies like Japan. Diagnosis of dementia can be made by physical and mental examinations, imaging tests, and findings of high abnormal proteins in cerebrospinal fluids. In addition, genetic tests can be performed in neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD), frontotemporal dementia (FTD), and Parkinson’s disease (PD). In this case series, we presented three cases of dementia with unknown causes who carry novel variants in the genes associated with neurodegenerative diseases. Three patients (Patients 1, 2, and 6) were found by screening 18 dementia patients using a gene panel including 63 genes. The age of onset for Patient 1 was 74 years old, and his father had PD and mother had AD. The age of onset for Patient 2 was 75 years old, and her mother had AD. The age of onset for Patient 6 was 83 years old, and her father, two sisters, and daughter had dementia. The Mini-Mental State Examination produced results of 20, 15, and 22, respectively. The suspected diagnosis by neurological examinations and imaging studies for Patients 1 and 2 was AD, and for Patient 6 was FTD. Patient 1 was treated with donepezil; Patient 2 was treated with donepezil and memantine; and Patient 6 was treated with donepezil, galantamine, and rivastigmine. The three rare variants identified were: CLCN1, encoding a chloride channel, c.2848G>A:p.Glu950Lys (Patient 1); RYR2, encoding a calcium releasing ryanodine receptor, c.13175A>G:p.Lys4392Arg (Patient 2); and DCTN1, encoding a subunit of dynactin, c. 3209G>A:p.Arg1070Gln (Patient 6). The detected variants were interpreted according to the American College of Medical Genetics (ACMG) guidelines. The minor allele frequency for each variant was 0.025%, 0.023%, and 0.0004% in East Asians, respectively. The DCTN1 variant found in Patient 6 might be associated with FTD. Although none of them were previously reported in dementia patients, all variants were classified as variants of unknown significance (VUS). Our report suggests that results of genetic tests in elderly patients with dementia need to be carefully interpreted. Further data accumulation of genotype–phenotype relationships and development of appropriate functional models are warranted. Full article
(This article belongs to the Section Geriatric Neurology)
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Review
Pneumococcal Pneumonia and Invasive Pneumococcal Disease in Those 65 and Older: Rates of Detection, Risk Factors, Vaccine Effectiveness, Hospitalisation and Mortality
Geriatrics 2021, 6(1), 13; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/geriatrics6010013 - 04 Feb 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 953
Abstract
Pneumococcal pneumonia (PP) and invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) are important causes of morbidity and mortality in seniors worldwide. Incidence rates and serious outcomes worsen with increasing frailty, numbers of risk factors and decreasing immune competence with increasing age. Literature reviews in Medline and [...] Read more.
Pneumococcal pneumonia (PP) and invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) are important causes of morbidity and mortality in seniors worldwide. Incidence rates and serious outcomes worsen with increasing frailty, numbers of risk factors and decreasing immune competence with increasing age. Literature reviews in Medline and Embase were performed for pneumococcal disease incidence, risk factors, vaccination rates and effectiveness in the elderly. The introduction of protein-conjugated pneumoccal vaccines (PCV) for children markedly reduced IPD and PP in seniors, but serotypes not included in vaccines and with previously low levels increased. Pneumococcal polysaccharide (PPV23) vaccination does not change nasal and pharyngeal carriage rates. Pneumococcal and influenza vaccination rates in seniors are below guideline levels, especially in older seniors and nursing home staff. Pneumococcal and influenza carriage and vaccination rates of family members, nursing home health care workers and other contacts are unknown. National vaccination programmes are effective in increasing vaccination rates. Detection of IPD and PP initially depend on clinical symptoms and new chest X ray infiltrates and then varies according to the population and laboratory tests used. To understand how seniors and especially older seniors acquire PP and IPD data are needed on pneumococcal disease and carriage rates in family members, carers and contacts. Nursing homes need reconfiguring into small units with air ventilation externally from all rooms to minimise respiratory disease transmission and dedicated staff for each unit to minimise transmision of infectious diseaases. Full article
Article
Why Don’t We Tube Feed Hip Fracture Patients? Findings from the Implementation of an Enteral Tube Feeding Decision Support Tool
Geriatrics 2021, 6(1), 12; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/geriatrics6010012 - 02 Feb 2021
Viewed by 607
Abstract
Background: This study aimed to report (i) the prevalence of enteral tube feeding (ETF), (ii) investigate whether implementing a decision support tool influenced ETF rates, and (iii) understand reasons influencing decisions to offer ETF. Methods: A pre/post evaluation included consecutive patients admitted to [...] Read more.
Background: This study aimed to report (i) the prevalence of enteral tube feeding (ETF), (ii) investigate whether implementing a decision support tool influenced ETF rates, and (iii) understand reasons influencing decisions to offer ETF. Methods: A pre/post evaluation included consecutive patients admitted to a hip fracture unit. Following baseline data collection, a published ETF Decision Support Tool was implemented by the multidisciplinary team to determine the necessity and influencing reasons for offering ETF. Results: Pre-post groups (n = 90,86) were well matched for age (83 vs. 84.5 years; p = 0.304) and gender (females 57 vs. 57; p = 0.683). ETF rates remained low across groups (pre/post n = 4,2; p = 0.683) despite high malnutrition prevalence (41.6% vs. 50.6%; p = 0.238). Diverse and conflicting reasons were identified regarding decisions to offer ETF. Conclusion: A complex interplay of factors influences the team decision-making process to offer ETF to nutritionally vulnerable patients. These demands are individualised, rather than algorithmic, involving shared decision-making and informed consent processes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Section Geriatric Nutrition)
Article
Clinical Features, Inpatient Trajectories and Frailty in Older Inpatients with COVID-19: A Retrospective Observational Study
Geriatrics 2021, 6(1), 11; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/geriatrics6010011 - 01 Feb 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 885
Abstract
Introduction: We describe the clinical features and inpatient trajectories of older adults hospitalized with COVID-19 and explore relationships with frailty. Methods: This retrospective observational study included older adults admitted as an emergency to a University Hospital who were diagnosed with COVID-19. Patient characteristics [...] Read more.
Introduction: We describe the clinical features and inpatient trajectories of older adults hospitalized with COVID-19 and explore relationships with frailty. Methods: This retrospective observational study included older adults admitted as an emergency to a University Hospital who were diagnosed with COVID-19. Patient characteristics and hospital outcomes, primarily inpatient death or death within 14 days of discharge, were described for the whole cohort and by frailty status. Associations with mortality were further evaluated using Cox Proportional Hazards Regression (Hazard Ratio (HR), 95% Confidence Interval). Results: 214 patients (94 women) were included of whom 142 (66.4%) were frail with a median Clinical Frailty Scale (CFS) score of 6. Frail compared to nonfrail patients were more likely to present with atypical symptoms including new or worsening confusion (45.1% vs. 20.8%, p < 0.001) and were more likely to die (66% vs. 16%, p = 0.001). Older age, being male, presenting with high illness acuity and high frailty were independent predictors of death and a dose–response association between frailty and mortality was observed (CFS 1–4: reference; CFS 5–6: HR 1.78, 95% CI 0.90, 3.53; CFS 7–8: HR 2.57, 95% CI 1.26, 5.24). Conclusions: Clinicians should have a low threshold for testing for COVID-19 in older and frail patients during periods of community viral transmission, and diagnosis should prompt early advanced care planning. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue SARS-CoV-2 Infections in the Elderly)
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Editorial
Acknowledgment to Reviewers of Geriatrics in 2020
Geriatrics 2021, 6(1), 9; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/geriatrics6010009 - 26 Jan 2021
Viewed by 445
Abstract
Peer review is the driving force of journal development, and reviewers are gatekeepers who ensure that Geriatrics maintains its standards for the high quality of its published papers [...] Full article
Article
Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s Diseases Predict Different COVID-19 Outcomes: A UK Biobank Study
Geriatrics 2021, 6(1), 10; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/geriatrics6010010 - 26 Jan 2021
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 1799
Abstract
In December 2019, a coronavirus, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), began infecting humans, causing a novel disease, coronavirus disease 19 (COVID-19). This was first described in the Wuhan province of the People’s Republic of China. SARS-CoV-2 has spread throughout the world, [...] Read more.
In December 2019, a coronavirus, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), began infecting humans, causing a novel disease, coronavirus disease 19 (COVID-19). This was first described in the Wuhan province of the People’s Republic of China. SARS-CoV-2 has spread throughout the world, causing a global pandemic. To date, thousands of cases of COVID-19 have been reported in the United Kingdom, and over 45,000 patients have died. Some progress has been achieved in managing this disease, but the biological determinants of health, in addition to age, that affect SARS-CoV-2 infectivity and mortality are under scrutiny. Recent studies show that several medical conditions, including diabetes and hypertension, increase the risk of COVID-19 and death. The increased vulnerability of elderly individuals and those with comorbidities, together with the prevalence of neurodegenerative diseases with advanced age, led us to investigate the links between neurodegeneration and COVID-19. We analysed the primary health records of 13,338 UK individuals tested for COVID-19 between March and July 2020. We show that a pre-existing diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease predicts the highest risk of COVID-19 and mortality among elderly individuals. In contrast, Parkinson’s disease patients were found to have a higher risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection but not mortality from COVID-19. We conclude that there are disease-specific differences in COVID-19 susceptibility among patients affected by neurodegenerative disorders. Full article
(This article belongs to the Section Geriatric Neurology)
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Article
Knee Extension Strength Measures Indicating Probable Sarcopenia Is Associated with Health-Related Outcomes and a Strong Predictor of 1-Year Mortality in Patients Following Hip Fracture Surgery
Geriatrics 2021, 6(1), 8; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/geriatrics6010008 - 15 Jan 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 736
Abstract
To examine if knee-extension strength (KES) measures indicating probable sarcopenia are associated with health-related outcomes and if KES and hand grip strength (HGS) measures are associated with 1-year mortality after hip fracture. Two groups of older patients with hip fracture had either HGS [...] Read more.
To examine if knee-extension strength (KES) measures indicating probable sarcopenia are associated with health-related outcomes and if KES and hand grip strength (HGS) measures are associated with 1-year mortality after hip fracture. Two groups of older patients with hip fracture had either HGS (n = 32) or KES (n = 150) assessed during their acute hospital stay. Cut-points for HGS (<27 kg for men and <16 kg for women), and cut-points for maximal isometric KES (non-fractured limb), being the lowest sex-specific quintile (<23.64 kg for men and <15.24 kg for women), were used to examine association with health-related outcomes and 1-year mortality. Overall, 1-year mortality was 12.6% in the two strength groups, of which 47% (HGS) and 46% (KES) respectively, were classified as probable sarcopenia. Probable sarcopenia patients (KES) had lower prefracture function, performed poorly in mobility measures and expressed a greater concern of falling compared to their stronger counterparts. Hazard ratio for 1-year mortality was 2.7 (95%CI = 0.49–14.7, p = 0.3) for HGS and 9.8 (95%CI = 2.2–43.0, p = 0.002) for KES for probable sarcopenia patients compared to those not. Sex-specific KES measures indicating sarcopenia is associated with health-related outcomes and a strong predictor of 1-year mortality after hip fracture. Full article
(This article belongs to the Section Geriatric Rehabilitation)
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Editorial
The Importance of Advancing Research on Aging and Driving
Geriatrics 2021, 6(1), 7; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/geriatrics6010007 - 14 Jan 2021
Viewed by 523
Abstract
Between 2009 and 2018, the number of older adults (i [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Aging and Driving)
Editorial
Geriatric Care Models
Geriatrics 2021, 6(1), 6; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/geriatrics6010006 - 12 Jan 2021
Viewed by 643
Abstract
This Special Issue on geriatric care models features 18 papers highlighting the evolving nature of healthcare delivery and the leadership and quality enhancement research provided by geriatric care models [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Geriatric Care Models)
Editorial
Dementia and Major Neurocognitive Disorders: Some Lessons Learned One Century after the first Alois Alzheimer’s Clinical Notes
Geriatrics 2021, 6(1), 5; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/geriatrics6010005 - 11 Jan 2021
Viewed by 672
Abstract
Over 100 years ago, Alois Alzheimer presented the clinical signs and symptoms of what has been later called “Alzheimer Dementia” in a young woman whose name was Augustine Deter [...] Full article
Communication
The GeriPACT Initiative to Prevent All-Cause 30-Day Readmission in High Risk Elderly
Geriatrics 2021, 6(1), 4; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/geriatrics6010004 - 06 Jan 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 789
Abstract
Background: Suboptimal care transitions increases the risk of adverse events resulting from poor care coordination among providers and healthcare facilities. The National Transition of Care Coalition recommends shifting the discharge paradigm from discharge from the hospital, to transfer with continuous management. The patient [...] Read more.
Background: Suboptimal care transitions increases the risk of adverse events resulting from poor care coordination among providers and healthcare facilities. The National Transition of Care Coalition recommends shifting the discharge paradigm from discharge from the hospital, to transfer with continuous management. The patient centered medical home is a promising model, which improves care coordination and may reduce hospital readmissions. Methods: This is a quality improvement report, the geriatric patient-aligned care team (GeriPACT) at Tennessee Valley Healthcare System (TVHS) participated in ongoing quality improvement (Plan, Do, Study, Act (PDSA)) cycles during teamlet meetings. Post home discharge follow-up for GeriPACT patients was provided by proactive telehealth communication by the Registered Nurse (RN) care manager and nurse practitioner. Periodic operations data obtained from the Data and Statistical Services (DSS) coordinator informed the PDSA cycles and teamlet meetings. Results: at baseline (July 2018–June 2019) the 30-day all-cause readmission for GeriPACT was 21%. From July to December 2019, 30-day all-cause readmissions were 13%. From January to June 2020, 30-day all-cause readmissions were 15%. Conclusion: PDSA cycles with sharing of operations data during GeriPACT teamlet meetings and fostering a shared responsibility for managing high-risk patients contributes to improved outcomes in 30-day all-cause readmissions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Geriatric Care Models)
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