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Progress on Diamane and Diamanoid Thin Film Pressureless Synthesis

1
Laboratorio de Nanociencia, Pontificia Universidad Católica Madre y Maestra, Santiago, Apartado Postal 822, Dominican Republic
2
Centre d’Elaboration des Matériaux et d’Etudes Structurales (CEMES), CNRS, Université de Toulouse, BP 94347, Toulouse CEDEX 4, 31055 Toulouse, France
3
Laboratoire de Physico-Chimie des Nano-Objets (LPCNO), CNRS, INSA, Université de Toulouse, 31400 Toulouse, France
4
Department of Chemistry, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB R3T 2N2, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 21 December 2020 / Revised: 15 January 2021 / Accepted: 17 January 2021 / Published: 23 January 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue 2D Ultrathin Carbon Films)
Nanometer-thick and crystalline sp3-bonded carbon sheets are promising new wide band-gap semiconducting materials for electronics, photonics, and medical devices. Diamane was prepared from the exposure of bi-layer graphene to hydrogen radicals produced by the hot-filament process at low pressure and temperature. A sharp sp3-bonded carbon stretching mode was observed in ultraviolet Raman spectra at around 1344–1367 cm−1 while no sp2-bonded carbon peak was simultaneously detected. By replacing bi-layer graphene with few-layer graphene, diamanoid/graphene hybrids were formed from the partial conversion of few-layer graphene, due to the prevalent Bernal stacking sequence. Raman spectroscopy, electron diffraction, and Density Functional Theory calculations show that partial conversion generates twisted bi-layer graphene located at the interface between the upper diamanoid domain and the non-converted graphenic domain underneath. Carbon-hydrogen bonding in the basal plane of hydrogenated few-layer graphene, where carbon is bonded to a single hydrogen over an area of 150 μm2, was directly evidenced by Fourier transform infrared microscopy and the actual full hydrogenation of diamane was supported by first-principle calculations. Those results open the door to large-scale production of diamane, diamanoids, and diamanoid/graphene hybrids. View Full-Text
Keywords: diamane; diamanoid; bi-layer graphene; twisted bi-layer graphene; hot-filament; hydrogenation; UV Raman spectroscopy diamane; diamanoid; bi-layer graphene; twisted bi-layer graphene; hot-filament; hydrogenation; UV Raman spectroscopy
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MDPI and ACS Style

Piazza, F.; Monthioux, M.; Puech, P.; Gerber, I.C.; Gough, K. Progress on Diamane and Diamanoid Thin Film Pressureless Synthesis. C 2021, 7, 9. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/c7010009

AMA Style

Piazza F, Monthioux M, Puech P, Gerber IC, Gough K. Progress on Diamane and Diamanoid Thin Film Pressureless Synthesis. C. 2021; 7(1):9. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/c7010009

Chicago/Turabian Style

Piazza, Fabrice; Monthioux, Marc; Puech, Pascal; Gerber, Iann C.; Gough, Kathleen. 2021. "Progress on Diamane and Diamanoid Thin Film Pressureless Synthesis" C 7, no. 1: 9. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/c7010009

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