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Article

A Gap Analysis of Ship-Recycling Practices in Indonesia

1
Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering Study Program, Universitas Indonesia, Depok 16424, Indonesia
2
Department of Ocean Engineering, Institut Teknologi Sepuluh Nopember, Surabaya 60111, Indonesia
3
Department of Naval Architecture and Shipbuilding Engineering, Institut Teknologi Adhi Tama Surabaya, Surabaya 60117, Indonesia
4
Department of Naval Architecture, Ocean and Marine Engineering, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0LZ, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Michele John and Junbeum Kim
Received: 7 December 2020 / Revised: 18 June 2021 / Accepted: 30 June 2021 / Published: 13 July 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers in Recycling 2021)
Ship recycling is gaining attention in Indonesia due to the increase in end-of-life ships and uneconomical nationally flagged ships, and is considered a prospective source of economic development and employment opportunity, and yet conceivably poses a threat to the health and safety of workers and the environment. There are international and national regulations that govern ship-recycling activities to ensure that the hazardous impacts of the industry are minimized. We investigated the disparity between current ship-breaking practices in Indonesia and the requirements of related international and national regulations, with the findings intended for use as a stepping stone to proposing a strategy to establish a green and sustainable ship-recycling industry. A benchmark study of the world’s leading ship-recycling countries was conducted, and a gap analysis was performed by comparing existing international and national regulations with current ship-breaking practices in Indonesia. We identified two types of ship-breaking practices in Indonesia: Conventional environmentally unfriendly ship-breaking method, conducted by most Indonesian ship-breaking yards, and a rather modern, more environmentally friendly method, conducted by ship-repair yards. However, neither of the practices met the requirements of the regulations, and improvements are therefore needed to make the ship-recycling industry more green and sustainable, and to gain international recognition. View Full-Text
Keywords: gap analysis; ship recycling; regulations; ship breaking; Hong Kong Convention gap analysis; ship recycling; regulations; ship breaking; Hong Kong Convention
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MDPI and ACS Style

Sunaryo, S.; Djatmiko, E.; Fariya, S.; Kurt, R.; Gunbeyaz, S. A Gap Analysis of Ship-Recycling Practices in Indonesia. Recycling 2021, 6, 48. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/recycling6030048

AMA Style

Sunaryo S, Djatmiko E, Fariya S, Kurt R, Gunbeyaz S. A Gap Analysis of Ship-Recycling Practices in Indonesia. Recycling. 2021; 6(3):48. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/recycling6030048

Chicago/Turabian Style

Sunaryo, Sunaryo, Eko Djatmiko, Siti Fariya, Rafet Kurt, and Sefer Gunbeyaz. 2021. "A Gap Analysis of Ship-Recycling Practices in Indonesia" Recycling 6, no. 3: 48. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/recycling6030048

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