Next Article in Journal
Health, Physical Activity and Musculoskeletal Symptoms among Stone, Sand, and Gravel Mine Workers: Implications for Enhancing and Sustaining Worker Health and Safety
Next Article in Special Issue
Comparative Analyses of Parameters Influencing Children Pedestrian Behavior in Conflict Zones of Urban Intersections
Previous Article in Journal
A Proposition for Combining Rough Sets, Fuzzy Logic and FRAM to Address Methodological Challenges in Safety Management: A Discussion Paper
Previous Article in Special Issue
Measuring Resilience Engineering: An Integrative Review and Framework for Bench-Marking Organisational Safety
Article

Measuring Resilience Potentials: A Pilot Program Using the Resilience Assessment Grid

Transport and Safety Sciences, College of Science and Sustainability, Central Queensland University, Brisbane 4211, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 29 September 2020 / Revised: 9 November 2020 / Accepted: 11 November 2020 / Published: 13 November 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Methods and Instruments for Evaluating and Measuring Safety)
Researchers in the resilience engineering space have proposed the notion that organisations operating in complex socio-technical systems cannot ‘be’ resilient but can have the ‘potential for resilient performance’. This theoretical stance also suggests that organisations wanting to enhance their potential for resilience begin by measuring their operational safety performance against four key potentials, these being: the Potential to Anticipate; the Potential to Respond; the Potential to Learn; and the Potential to Monitor. Furthermore, to measure these four key resilience constructs, organisations have been recommended to use a Resilience Assessment Grid (RAG) developed as part of this theory. However, scarce research appears to have been conducted that bridges the theory and practice divide on just how organisations can pragmatically measure their current performance against these four resilience potentials using the RAG. Therefore, this research was interested in undertaking a pilot study using RAG theory in order to examine an organisation’s four resilience potentials, and was conducted within a large road transport organisation in Australia. Results indicated that measuring both the four individual potentials and a combination of the four potentials was possible using a RAG and proved effective in providing a snapshot of operational safety system resilience concepts. Recommendations on how to increase organisational resilience potentials were provided to ensure future safety endeavours would enhance the organisation’s potential to be resilience in the face of system variability and operational demands. View Full-Text
Keywords: resilience; resilience assessment grid; road transport; resilience potentials; safety science resilience; resilience assessment grid; road transport; resilience potentials; safety science
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Klockner, K.; Meredith, P. Measuring Resilience Potentials: A Pilot Program Using the Resilience Assessment Grid. Safety 2020, 6, 51. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/safety6040051

AMA Style

Klockner K, Meredith P. Measuring Resilience Potentials: A Pilot Program Using the Resilience Assessment Grid. Safety. 2020; 6(4):51. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/safety6040051

Chicago/Turabian Style

Klockner, Karen, and Peter Meredith. 2020. "Measuring Resilience Potentials: A Pilot Program Using the Resilience Assessment Grid" Safety 6, no. 4: 51. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/safety6040051

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop