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Article

Investigating the Dietary Habits of Male Irish Farmers to Prevent Mortality and Morbidity

1
National Centre for Men’s Health, Institute of Technology Carlow, R93 V960 Carlow, Ireland
2
Department of Exercise and Health Science, Waterford Institute of Technology, X91 K0EK Waterford, Ireland
3
School of Agriculture and Food Science, University College Dublin, D04 V1W8 Dublin, Ireland
4
School of Public Health, Physiotherapy & Sports Science, University College Dublin, D04 V1W8 Dublin, Ireland
5
Teagasc-Agriculture and Food Development Authority, Kildalton, E32 YT92 Kilkenny, Ireland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Raphael Grzebieta
Received: 17 March 2021 / Revised: 5 July 2021 / Accepted: 13 July 2021 / Published: 16 July 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Farm Safety)
Excess mortality and morbidity among Irish farmers from non-communicable diseases (NCDs) has been linked to a range of occupational risk factors. Obesity is a key risk factor underpinning this excess burden and unhealthy eating habits are linked to overweight/obesity and to disease occurrence. This study investigated the dietary habits of a sub-group of Irish male farmers and explored how these might potentially impact on health outcomes. Cross-sectional survey research was undertaken using self-reported quantitative data, based on convenience sampling and a 24-h food re-call survey. Data were analysed using frequency and chi-square analysis. Where possible, findings were compared to national survey data for Irish males. Findings revealed that a high proportion of farmers were overweight or obese and that dietary habits consisted of low intake of fruit, vegetables, and dairy and a high intake of meat, fried and processed foods, salt, and sugary and/or salty snacks. Younger farmers reported a significantly higher intake of processed meats; however, no associations were found between age, lifestyle behaviours, and dietary habits. The findings provide a greater understanding of how dietary habits potentially contribute to poorer health outcomes among farmers and underline the need for health promotion interventions, including healthy eating campaigns, aimed at farmers. View Full-Text
Keywords: farmers; dietary habits; gender; mortality; morbidity; occupational diseases; non-communicable diseases; OSH; overweight/obesity; Total Worker Health farmers; dietary habits; gender; mortality; morbidity; occupational diseases; non-communicable diseases; OSH; overweight/obesity; Total Worker Health
MDPI and ACS Style

van Doorn, D.; Richardson, N.; Storey, A.; Osborne, A.; Cunningham, C.; Blake, C.; McNamara, J. Investigating the Dietary Habits of Male Irish Farmers to Prevent Mortality and Morbidity. Safety 2021, 7, 54. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/safety7030054

AMA Style

van Doorn D, Richardson N, Storey A, Osborne A, Cunningham C, Blake C, McNamara J. Investigating the Dietary Habits of Male Irish Farmers to Prevent Mortality and Morbidity. Safety. 2021; 7(3):54. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/safety7030054

Chicago/Turabian Style

van Doorn, Diana, Noel Richardson, Aubrey Storey, Aoife Osborne, Caitriona Cunningham, Catherine Blake, and John McNamara. 2021. "Investigating the Dietary Habits of Male Irish Farmers to Prevent Mortality and Morbidity" Safety 7, no. 3: 54. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/safety7030054

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