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Article

“Just One Short Voice Message”—Comparing the Effects of Text- vs. Voice-Based Answering to Text Messages via Smartphone on Young Drivers’ Driving Performances

1
Institute of Traffic and Engineering Psychology, German Police University, Zum Roten Berge 18–24, 48165 Münster, Germany
2
Institute of Transportation Systems, German Aerospace Center (DLR), Lilienthalplatz 7, 38108 Braunschweig, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Raphael Grzebieta
Safety 2021, 7(3), 57; https://doi.org/10.3390/safety7030057
Received: 2 December 2020 / Revised: 11 June 2021 / Accepted: 23 July 2021 / Published: 30 July 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Driver Behavior Safety Research in Road Transportation)
Despite the well-known distracting effects, many drivers still engage in phone use, especially texting and especially among young drivers, with new emerging messaging modes. The present study aims to examine the effects of different answering modes on driving performance. Twenty-four students (12 females), aged between 19 and 25 years (M = 20.83, SD = 1.53), volunteered for the study. They accomplished the Lane Change Task (LCT) with baseline and dual-task runs in a driving simulator. In dual-task runs, participants answered text messages on a smartphone by voice or text message with varying task complexity. Driving performance was measured by lane deviation (LCT) and subjective measures (NASA-TLX). Across all trials, driving performance deteriorated during dual-task runs compared with the baseline runs, and subjective demand increased. Analysis of dual-task runs showed a benefit for voice-based answering to received text messages that leveled off in the complex task. All in all, the benefits of using voice-based answering in comparison with text-based answering were found regarding driving performance and subjective measures. Nevertheless, this benefit was mostly lost in the complex task, and both the driving performance and the demand measured in the baseline conditions could not be reached. View Full-Text
Keywords: driver behavior; driver distraction; texting while driving; voice messaging; driving performance; Lane Change Task driver behavior; driver distraction; texting while driving; voice messaging; driving performance; Lane Change Task
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MDPI and ACS Style

Kurtz, M.; Oehl, M.; Sutter, C. “Just One Short Voice Message”—Comparing the Effects of Text- vs. Voice-Based Answering to Text Messages via Smartphone on Young Drivers’ Driving Performances. Safety 2021, 7, 57. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/safety7030057

AMA Style

Kurtz M, Oehl M, Sutter C. “Just One Short Voice Message”—Comparing the Effects of Text- vs. Voice-Based Answering to Text Messages via Smartphone on Young Drivers’ Driving Performances. Safety. 2021; 7(3):57. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/safety7030057

Chicago/Turabian Style

Kurtz, Max, Michael Oehl, and Christine Sutter. 2021. "“Just One Short Voice Message”—Comparing the Effects of Text- vs. Voice-Based Answering to Text Messages via Smartphone on Young Drivers’ Driving Performances" Safety 7, no. 3: 57. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/safety7030057

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