Next Issue
Volume 1, June

Histories, Volume 1, Issue 1 (March 2021) – 8 articles

  • Issues are regarded as officially published after their release is announced to the table of contents alert mailing list.
  • You may sign up for e-mail alerts to receive table of contents of newly released issues.
  • PDF is the official format for papers published in both, html and pdf forms. To view the papers in pdf format, click on the "PDF Full-text" link, and use the free Adobe Readerexternal link to open them.
Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:
Article
Drinking Coffee with My “Victims”: The Risks Incurred When a Historian Makes a Public Intervention in the Present
Histories 2021, 1(1), 42-51; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/histories1010008 - 27 Jan 2021
Viewed by 706
Abstract
In 2016, the Swiss government tasked a commission of experts to investigate its former coercive welfare measures. Before 1981, innumerable children, young people and adults alike were affected by them. From the very start, this commission drew those affected into their research—with ambiguous [...] Read more.
In 2016, the Swiss government tasked a commission of experts to investigate its former coercive welfare measures. Before 1981, innumerable children, young people and adults alike were affected by them. From the very start, this commission drew those affected into their research—with ambiguous consequences, both for the people themselves and for the research project. Criticism of this undertaking in the media resulted in a vehement reaction. A discussion over a cup of coffee did not bring the parties involved any closer to a common understanding, but at least it enabled the historian to assess the impact of his intervention. In a best-case scenario, the result of such discussions can enable de-escalation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue History from Scratch – Voices across the Planet)
Article
In Search of the Origins of the Western Mind: McGilchrist and the Axial Age
Histories 2021, 1(1), 24-41; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/histories1010007 - 25 Jan 2021
Viewed by 515
Abstract
This paper considers and analyses the idea propounded by Iain McGilchrist that the foundation of Western rationalism is the dominance of the left side of the brain and that this occurred first in ancient Greece. It argues that the transformation that occurred in [...] Read more.
This paper considers and analyses the idea propounded by Iain McGilchrist that the foundation of Western rationalism is the dominance of the left side of the brain and that this occurred first in ancient Greece. It argues that the transformation that occurred in Greece, as part of a more widespread transformation that is sometimes termed the Axial Age, was, at least in part, connected to the emergence of literacy which transformed the workings of the human brain. This transformation was not uniform and took different forms in different civilisations, including China and India. The emergence of what Donald terms a “theoretic” culture or what can also be called “rationalism” is best understood in terms of transformations in language, including the transition from poetry to prose and the separation of word and thing. Hence, the development of theoretic culture in Greece is best understood in terms of the particularity of Greek cultural development. This transition both created aporias, as exemplified by the opposition between the ontologies of “being” and “becoming”, and led to the eventual victory of theoretic culture that established the hegemony of the left side of the brain. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue History from Scratch – Voices across the Planet)
Editorial
A Case for the History of Criminology and Criminal Justice
Histories 2021, 1(1), 22-23; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/histories1010006 - 01 Dec 2020
Viewed by 570
Abstract
The discipline of Criminology and Criminal Justice (CCJ) encompasses the study of any issue associated with crime [...] Full article
Article
Is Historical Temporality “Heterogeneous” and “Contingent”? William H. Sewell’s Cultural Turn
Histories 2021, 1(1), 12-21; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/histories1010005 - 18 Nov 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 720
Abstract
“Time” and “temporality” are difficult and central notions for historical scholarship. They exist in many varieties, which renders generalizations challenging. An interesting attempt has been made by US-scholar William H. Sewell in his Logics of History. Social Theory and Social Transformation (2005). [...] Read more.
“Time” and “temporality” are difficult and central notions for historical scholarship. They exist in many varieties, which renders generalizations challenging. An interesting attempt has been made by US-scholar William H. Sewell in his Logics of History. Social Theory and Social Transformation (2005). He qualifies historical temporality as fateful, contingent, complex, eventful, and heterogeneous. It is rare for a historian to be so explicit. Sewell was inspired by discussions with sociologists and anthropologists during his transition from social to cultural history in the 1980 and 1990s. This article examines the question whether and how the change of the intellectual environment impacted the theoretical outcome. Are Sewell’s attributes to historical temporality plausible for historical scholarship in general, or do they reflect the boundary work of a particular group? Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue History from Scratch – Voices across the Planet)
Editorial
A Case for Comparative History
Histories 2021, 1(1), 10-11; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/histories1010004 - 03 Nov 2020
Viewed by 693
Abstract
The launch, at the time of a global pandemic that has dramatically altered the way academics teach and do research, of a new peer-reviewed, open-access history journal is twice welcome—for it manifests the continuing ability of the discipline of history to make sense [...] Read more.
The launch, at the time of a global pandemic that has dramatically altered the way academics teach and do research, of a new peer-reviewed, open-access history journal is twice welcome—for it manifests the continuing ability of the discipline of history to make sense of the time and world in which we live as well as its endurance in increasingly science-oriented academia [...] Full article
Editorial
A Case for the History of Ideas
Histories 2021, 1(1), 5-9; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/histories1010003 - 28 Oct 2020
Viewed by 712
Abstract
As a graduate student, I undertook my doctoral training in a Political Science Program [...] Full article
Editorial
A Case for a History of Ordinary Lives
Histories 2021, 1(1), 3-4; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/histories1010002 - 23 Oct 2020
Viewed by 650
Abstract
What is “normal” does not leave major traces. The historiography on colonial Andes is mostly based on trials and petitions, the most detailed sources that historians have to reconstruct the lives of indigenous people, since they include at least part of their voices. [...] Read more.
What is “normal” does not leave major traces. The historiography on colonial Andes is mostly based on trials and petitions, the most detailed sources that historians have to reconstruct the lives of indigenous people, since they include at least part of their voices. However, they show the perspective of native authorities, of exceptional people who wrote or initiated trials, or of people during special conjunctures, such as the rebellions. With this case, I propose sources that show the traces of the normal, especially the traces left in those places where native authorities were not important, where trials were just a few or limited to some specific events, or where the “moral economy” was not altered. Full article
Editorial
A Case for Global Microhistory
Histories 2021, 1(1), 1-2; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/histories1010001 - 02 Sep 2020
Viewed by 1018
Abstract
Histories is an international, peer-reviewed open-access journal in its starting phase [...] Full article
Next Issue
Back to TopTop