Next Article in Journal
Effects of Dissolved Potassium on Growth Performance, Body Composition, and Welfare of Juvenile African Catfish (Clarias gariepinus)
Previous Article in Journal
Acceptance of a Protein Concentrate from Alfalfa (Medicago sativa) by Yellow Perch (Perca flavescens) Fed a Formulated Diet
Previous Article in Special Issue
Eradication of the Invasive Common Carp, Cyprinus carpio from a Large Lake: Lessons and Insights from the Tasmanian Experience
Article

Numeric Simulation Demonstrates That the Upstream Movement of Invasive Bigheaded Carp Can Be Blocked at Sets of Mississippi River Locks-and-Dams Using a Combination of Optimized Spillway Gate Operations, Lock Deterrents, and Carp Removal

1
Great Lakes Fishery Commission, 2200 Commonwealth Blvd., Suite 100, Ann Arbor, MI 48105, USA
2
Department of Fisheries, Wildlife and Conservation Biology, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MI 55018, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Maria Angeles Esteban
Received: 13 March 2021 / Revised: 23 March 2021 / Accepted: 24 March 2021 / Published: 26 March 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biology and Control of Invasive Fishes)
Invasive bigheaded carp are advancing up the Upper Mississippi River by passing through its locks-and-dams (LDs). Although these structures already impede fish passage, this role could be greatly enhanced by modifying how their spillway gates operate, adding deterrent systems to their locks, and removing carp. This study examined this possibility using numeric modeling and empirical data, which evaluated all three options on an annual basis in both single LDs and pairs under different river flow conditions. Over 100 scenarios were modeled. While all three approaches showed promise, ranging from 8% to 73% reductions in how many carp pass a single LD, when employed together at pairs of LDs, upstream movement rates of invasive carp could be reduced 98–99% from current levels. Although modifying spillway gate operation is the least expensive option, its efficacy drops at high flows, so lock deterrents and/or removal using fishing/trapping are required to move towards complete blockage. Improved deterrent efficacy could also offset the need for more efficient removal. This model could help prioritize research and management actions for containing carp. View Full-Text
Keywords: integrated pest management; model; hydraulic; acoustic deterrent; invasive fish; conservation integrated pest management; model; hydraulic; acoustic deterrent; invasive fish; conservation
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Zielinski, D.P.; Sorensen, P.W. Numeric Simulation Demonstrates That the Upstream Movement of Invasive Bigheaded Carp Can Be Blocked at Sets of Mississippi River Locks-and-Dams Using a Combination of Optimized Spillway Gate Operations, Lock Deterrents, and Carp Removal. Fishes 2021, 6, 10. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/fishes6020010

AMA Style

Zielinski DP, Sorensen PW. Numeric Simulation Demonstrates That the Upstream Movement of Invasive Bigheaded Carp Can Be Blocked at Sets of Mississippi River Locks-and-Dams Using a Combination of Optimized Spillway Gate Operations, Lock Deterrents, and Carp Removal. Fishes. 2021; 6(2):10. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/fishes6020010

Chicago/Turabian Style

Zielinski, Daniel P., and Peter W. Sorensen 2021. "Numeric Simulation Demonstrates That the Upstream Movement of Invasive Bigheaded Carp Can Be Blocked at Sets of Mississippi River Locks-and-Dams Using a Combination of Optimized Spillway Gate Operations, Lock Deterrents, and Carp Removal" Fishes 6, no. 2: 10. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/fishes6020010

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop