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Brief Report

Sex Differences in Response to Listening to Self-Selected Music during Repeated High-Intensity Sprint Exercise

Department of Kinesiology, Samford University, 800 Lakeshore Drive, Birmingham, AL 35229, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Indicates authors contributed equally.
Received: 29 December 2020 / Revised: 13 January 2021 / Accepted: 15 January 2021 / Published: 18 January 2021
The purpose of this study was to examine possible sex differences in high-intensity exercise performance, fatigue, and motivational responses to exercise while listening to music. Physically active males and females (ages 18–24) were recruited to participate. Participants completed two separate repeated sprint exercise trials each with a different condition: (1) no music (NM) (2) self-selected music (SSM). During each trial, participants completed 3 × 15 s Wingate anaerobic tests (WAnTs) while listening to NM or SSM separated by 2 min of active recovery. Following each WAnT, rate of perceived exertion (RPE) and motivation to exercise were assessed. Relative power output, fatigue index, RPE, and motivation were analyzed. There were no significant sex differences for relative power between music conditions (p = 0.228). Fatigue index was significantly lower in females while listening to SSM (p = 0.032) versus NM while no differences were observed for males (p = 0.246). RPE was lower while listening to SSM versus NM in females (p = 0.020), but not for males (p = 0.277). Lastly, motivation to exercise increased in the SSM condition versus NM in females (p = 0.006) but not in males (p = 0.090). Results indicate that listening to SSM music did not result in superior anaerobic performance in either sex, but females responded more favorably to subjective outcomes (i.e., RPE and motivation) while listening to SSM, which may have in turn influenced indices of fatigue during the tests. These results suggest that females may respond more positively than males to exercise-induced fatigue while listening to SSM music during repeated bouts of high-intensity exercise. View Full-Text
Keywords: Wingate; anaerobic; motivation; perceived exertion; fatigue index Wingate; anaerobic; motivation; perceived exertion; fatigue index
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MDPI and ACS Style

Rhoads, K.J.; Sosa, S.R.; Rogers, R.R.; Kopec, T.J.; Ballmann, C.G. Sex Differences in Response to Listening to Self-Selected Music during Repeated High-Intensity Sprint Exercise. Sexes 2021, 2, 60-68. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/sexes2010005

AMA Style

Rhoads KJ, Sosa SR, Rogers RR, Kopec TJ, Ballmann CG. Sex Differences in Response to Listening to Self-Selected Music during Repeated High-Intensity Sprint Exercise. Sexes. 2021; 2(1):60-68. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/sexes2010005

Chicago/Turabian Style

Rhoads, Kendall J., Sierra R. Sosa, Rebecca R. Rogers, Thomas J. Kopec, and Christopher G. Ballmann 2021. "Sex Differences in Response to Listening to Self-Selected Music during Repeated High-Intensity Sprint Exercise" Sexes 2, no. 1: 60-68. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/sexes2010005

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