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Article

The Trauma Recovery Actions Checklist: Applying Mixed Methods to a Holistic Gender-Based Violence Recovery Actions Measure

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College of Public Health, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA 19140, USA
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Emili Sagol Research Center, School of Creative Art Therapies, University of Haifa, 199 Abba Khoushy Ave., Mount Carmel, Haifa 3498838, Israel
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School of Nursing, University of Michigan, 400 North Ingalls Bldg, Ste. 2303, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Joana Carvalho
Received: 10 July 2021 / Revised: 19 August 2021 / Accepted: 31 August 2021 / Published: 7 September 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sexual Relationships, Sexual Behaviors and Gender-Based Violence)
Gender-Based Violence (GBV) trauma recovery models have evolved in such a way that survivors are viewed as actively engaging in a multitude of strategies. In addition to seeking help and coping, survivors engage in diverse lifestyle, social, spiritual, and practical strategies to promote their health and wellbeing. This exploratory sequential mixed-methods study develops an instrument to measure the holistic recovery actions used by GBV survivors. The qualitative phase combined recovery action codes from interviews with 50 GBV survivors in three different survivor samples to create an initial six-concept 41-item Trauma Recovery Actions Checklist (TRAC). The quantitative psychometrics phase used data from 289 American GBV survivors. Results revealed a five-factor 35-item final version (sharing/connecting; building positive emotions; reflecting and creating healing spaces; establishing security; and planning the future). There were positive significant correlations between sharing/connecting and depression scores, and between sharing/connecting, reflecting, and building security with PTSD scores. No correlations were found between any recovery action type and the barriers to help-seeking subscales of Problem Management Beliefs, Discrimination, or Unavailability. However, there were significant negative correlations between Shame and Financial barriers and Sharing/Connecting, and between Feeling Frozen, Constraints, and Establishing Security. Implications for research, clinical practice and ways of understanding survivorship recovery are suggested. View Full-Text
Keywords: sexual assault; sexual abuse; rape; intimate partner violence; interpersonal trauma; trauma recovery; mental health; help-seeking; mixed-methods research sexual assault; sexual abuse; rape; intimate partner violence; interpersonal trauma; trauma recovery; mental health; help-seeking; mixed-methods research
MDPI and ACS Style

Sinko, L.; Goldner, L.; Saint Arnault, D.M. The Trauma Recovery Actions Checklist: Applying Mixed Methods to a Holistic Gender-Based Violence Recovery Actions Measure. Sexes 2021, 2, 363-377. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/sexes2030029

AMA Style

Sinko L, Goldner L, Saint Arnault DM. The Trauma Recovery Actions Checklist: Applying Mixed Methods to a Holistic Gender-Based Violence Recovery Actions Measure. Sexes. 2021; 2(3):363-377. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/sexes2030029

Chicago/Turabian Style

Sinko, Laura, Limor Goldner, and Denise M. Saint Arnault 2021. "The Trauma Recovery Actions Checklist: Applying Mixed Methods to a Holistic Gender-Based Violence Recovery Actions Measure" Sexes 2, no. 3: 363-377. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/sexes2030029

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