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Volume 2, September

Sexes, Volume 2, Issue 4 (December 2021) – 5 articles

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Article
Dream It, Do It? Associations between Pornography Use, Risky Sexual Behaviour, Sexual Preoccupation and Sexting Behaviours among Young Australian Adults
Sexes 2021, 2(4), 433-444; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/sexes2040034 (registering DOI) - 16 Oct 2021
Abstract
While sexting behaviours have attracted increasing research focus over the last decade as both normative and deviant forms of sexual activity, little attention has been paid to their potential associations with sexual preoccupation and heightened interest in sex. The current study sought to [...] Read more.
While sexting behaviours have attracted increasing research focus over the last decade as both normative and deviant forms of sexual activity, little attention has been paid to their potential associations with sexual preoccupation and heightened interest in sex. The current study sought to identify whether sexual preoccupation significantly predicts sending, receiving, and disseminating sexts, after controlling for pornography use and risky sexual behaviours. Young Australian adult participants (N = 654, 78.8% women) aged 18 to 34 (M = 19.78, SD = 1.66) completed an anonymous online self-report questionnaire regarding their engagement in sexting behaviours (sending, receiving, and dissemination), pornography use, risky sexual behaviours, and sexual preoccupation. Results showed that individuals with higher sexual preoccupation were more likely to engage in pornography use and risky sexual behaviours. Binary hierarchical logistic regressions revealed that sexual preoccupation predicted higher rates of sending and receiving sexts. However, sexual preoccupation did not significantly contribute to increased rates of sext dissemination. Our study illustrates the need to incorporate pornography viewing and sexting into the promotion of safe sexual behaviours in online and offline contexts, and the potential to utilise modern technology to negotiate safer sex practices. Full article
(This article belongs to the Section Sexual Behavior and Attitudes)
Commentary
Four Problems in Sexting Research and Their Solutions
Sexes 2021, 2(4), 415-432; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/sexes2040033 - 10 Oct 2021
Viewed by 279
Abstract
Despite over 10 years of research, we still know very little about people’s sexting behaviours and experiences. Our limited and, at times, conflicting knowledge about sexting is due to re-searchers’ use of inconsistent conceptual definitions of sexting, dubious measurement practices, and atheoretical research [...] Read more.
Despite over 10 years of research, we still know very little about people’s sexting behaviours and experiences. Our limited and, at times, conflicting knowledge about sexting is due to re-searchers’ use of inconsistent conceptual definitions of sexting, dubious measurement practices, and atheoretical research designs. In this article, we provide an overview of the history of sex-ting research and describe how researchers have contributed to the ‘moral panic’ narrative that continues to surround popular media discourse about sexting. We identify four key problems that still plague sexting research today: (1) imprudent focus on the medium, (2) inconsistent conceptual definitions, (3) poor measurement practices, and (4) a lack of theoretical frameworks. We describe and expand on solutions to address each of these problems. In particular, we focus on the need to shift empirical attention away from sexting and towards the behavioural domain of technology-mediated sexual interaction. We believe that the implementation of these solu-tions will lead to valid and sustainable knowledge development on technology-mediated sexual interactions, including sexting. Full article
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Review
Does Bed Sharing with an Infant Influence Parents’ Sexual Life? A Scoping Review in Western Countries
Sexes 2021, 2(4), 406-414; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/sexes2040032 - 29 Sep 2021
Viewed by 255
Abstract
Bed sharing—the sharing of a sleeping surface by parents and children—is a common, yet controversial, practice. While most research has focused on the public health aspect of this practice, much less is known regarding its effect on the marital relationship. The aim of [...] Read more.
Bed sharing—the sharing of a sleeping surface by parents and children—is a common, yet controversial, practice. While most research has focused on the public health aspect of this practice, much less is known regarding its effect on the marital relationship. The aim of the present study was to conduct a scoping review on the impact of parent–infant bed sharing sleeping practices on the sexual and marital relationship of couples. The qualitative synthesis of six studies on this topic suggests that overall, bed sharing does not exert a significant negative impact on family functioning; when it does, it appears to be related to incongruent parental beliefs and expectations, especially when bed sharing is not an intentional choice of sleep arrangement, and there are other confounding factors such as fatigue and psychological distress. Suggestions for future studies and clinical implications are discussed. Full article
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Review
Overview of Medical Management of Transgender Men: Perspectives from Sri Lanka
Sexes 2021, 2(4), 397-405; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/sexes2040031 - 28 Sep 2021
Viewed by 224
Abstract
Transgender medicine is an evolving field of medicine due to the rising awareness of individuals with a non-binary gender identity. Individuals with nonconforming gender identities have been on the rise in many societies and it is becoming an increasingly discussed issue. Their management [...] Read more.
Transgender medicine is an evolving field of medicine due to the rising awareness of individuals with a non-binary gender identity. Individuals with nonconforming gender identities have been on the rise in many societies and it is becoming an increasingly discussed issue. Their management is multidisciplinary, which includes mental health, endocrine therapy, and surgery. Although their general healthcare needs are similar to those of the general population, special considerations in primary and preventive care are also necessary in relation to the gender-affirming medical issues. Their quality of life is largely affected by psychological, social, and economic difficulties they face due to acceptance issues in the society and healthcare. This review explores the primary care, medical, and surgical management of transgender men with perspectives from Sri Lanka. Full article
Review
Understanding Sexual Agency. Implications for Sexual Health Programming
Sexes 2021, 2(4), 378-396; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/sexes2040030 - 23 Sep 2021
Viewed by 449
Abstract
Debates on human agency, especially female and sexual agency, have permeated the social scientific literature and health educational practice for multiple decades now. This article provides a review of recent agency debates illustrating how criticisms of traditional conceptions of (sexual) agency have led [...] Read more.
Debates on human agency, especially female and sexual agency, have permeated the social scientific literature and health educational practice for multiple decades now. This article provides a review of recent agency debates illustrating how criticisms of traditional conceptions of (sexual) agency have led to a notable diversification of the concept. A comprehensive, inclusive description of sexual agency is proposed, focusing on the navigation of goals and desires in the wider structural context, and acknowledging the many forms sexual agency may take. We argue there is no simple relation between sexual agency and sexual health. Next, we describe the implications of such an understanding of sexual agency for Comprehensive Sexuality Education (CSE) and for sexual health and rights (SHR) programming more generally. We put forward validation of agentic variety, gender transformative approaches, meaningful youth participation, and multicomponent strategies as essential in building young peoples’ sexual agency and their role as agents of wider societal change. We also show that these essential conditions, wherever they have been studied, are far from being realized. With this review and connected recommendations, we hope to set the stage for ongoing, well-focused research and development in the area. Full article
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