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Article

The Way Forward for Indirect Structural Health Monitoring (iSHM) Using Connected and Automated Vehicles in Europe

Joint Research Centre (JRC), European Commission, 21027 Ispra, Italy
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Alessandro Zona and Andy Nguyen
Received: 28 December 2020 / Revised: 3 March 2021 / Accepted: 3 March 2021 / Published: 13 March 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Structural Health Monitoring of Civil Infrastructures)
Europe’s aging transportation infrastructure requires optimized maintenance programs. However, data and monitoring systems may not be readily available to support strategic decisions or they may require costly installations in terms of time and labor requirements. In recent years, the possibility of monitoring bridges by indirectly sensing relevant parameters from traveling vehicles has emerged—an approach that would allow for the elimination of the costly installation of sensors and monitoring campaigns. The advantages of cooperative, connected, and automated mobility (CCAM), which is expected to become a reality in Europe towards the end of this decade, should therefore be considered for the future development of iSHM strategies. A critical review of methods and strategies for CCAM, including Intelligent Transportation Systems, is a prerequisite for moving towards the goal of identifying the synergies between CCAM and civil infrastructures, in line with future developments in vehicle automation. This study presents the policy framework of CCAM in Europe and discusses the policy enablers and bottlenecks of using CCAM in the drive-by monitoring of transport infrastructure. It also highlights the current direction of research within the iSHM paradigm towards the identification of technologies and methods that could benefit from the use of connected and automated vehicles (CAVs). View Full-Text
Keywords: iSHM; drive-by monitoring; vehicle–bridge interactions; connected and automated vehicles; bridge safety; Europe iSHM; drive-by monitoring; vehicle–bridge interactions; connected and automated vehicles; bridge safety; Europe
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MDPI and ACS Style

Gkoumas, K.; Gkoktsi, K.; Bono, F.; Galassi, M.C.; Tirelli, D. The Way Forward for Indirect Structural Health Monitoring (iSHM) Using Connected and Automated Vehicles in Europe. Infrastructures 2021, 6, 43. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/infrastructures6030043

AMA Style

Gkoumas K, Gkoktsi K, Bono F, Galassi MC, Tirelli D. The Way Forward for Indirect Structural Health Monitoring (iSHM) Using Connected and Automated Vehicles in Europe. Infrastructures. 2021; 6(3):43. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/infrastructures6030043

Chicago/Turabian Style

Gkoumas, Konstantinos, Kyriaki Gkoktsi, Flavio Bono, Maria C. Galassi, and Daniel Tirelli. 2021. "The Way Forward for Indirect Structural Health Monitoring (iSHM) Using Connected and Automated Vehicles in Europe" Infrastructures 6, no. 3: 43. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/infrastructures6030043

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