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Article

Antimalarial Drugs in Ghana: A Case Study on Personal Preferences

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Division of Bioorganic Chemistry, School of Pharmacy, Saarland University, D-66123 Saarbruecken, Germany
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Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, PMB, Kumasi, Ghana
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Department of Pharmacy Practice, Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, PMB, Kumasi, Ghana
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Department for Economics and Sociology of Sports, Faculty of Economics and Empirical Human Sciences, Institute of Sport Sciences, Saarland University, D-66123 Saarbruecken, Germany
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Faculty of Economics and Empirical Human Sciences, Saarland University, D-66123 Saarbruecken, Germany
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Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 8 April 2020 / Accepted: 10 April 2020 / Published: 3 July 2020
Malaria is a serious infection affecting millions of people in Africa. Our study investigated the personal preferences and applications of antimalarial medicines in Ghana. Based on over 1000 questionnaires distributed in Ghana from January to May 2019, we noticed that although Western medications to fight this disease are widely available, most patients in Ghana prefer treatment with locally produced herbal remedies. This preference appears to be due to a combination of traditional venues for obtaining medicines “on the street” rather than in licensed pharmacies, trust in local and “green” products, extensive advertisement of such local products, and an inherent distrust of imported and synthetic or orthodox medicines. Going local and natural is a trend also observed in other countries across the globe and adds to the acceptance or rejection of drugs regardless of their activity or toxicity. In fact, adverse side effects associated with herbal remedies, such as general weakness, swelling and sore mouth, do not seem to deter the respondents of this study in Ghana. We propose a combination of (a) increasing public awareness of the benefits of modern medicine and (b) an improvement and control of the quality of herbal remedies to raise the standard for the treatment of malaria in countries such as Ghana. View Full-Text
Keywords: adverse drug reactions; antimalarial; Ghana; herbal remedies; malaria; questionnaire; street sale; orthodox medicines; patient preference adverse drug reactions; antimalarial; Ghana; herbal remedies; malaria; questionnaire; street sale; orthodox medicines; patient preference
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MDPI and ACS Style

Yeboah, P.; Forkuo, A.D.; Amponsah, O.K.O.; Adomako, N.O.; Abdin, A.Y.; Nasim, M.J.; Werner, P.; Panyin, A.B.; Emrich, E.; Jacob, C. Antimalarial Drugs in Ghana: A Case Study on Personal Preferences. Sci 2020, 2, 49. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/sci2030049

AMA Style

Yeboah P, Forkuo AD, Amponsah OKO, Adomako NO, Abdin AY, Nasim MJ, Werner P, Panyin AB, Emrich E, Jacob C. Antimalarial Drugs in Ghana: A Case Study on Personal Preferences. Sci. 2020; 2(3):49. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/sci2030049

Chicago/Turabian Style

Yeboah, Prince, Arnold D. Forkuo, Obed K.O. Amponsah, Nana O. Adomako, Ahmad Y. Abdin, Muhammad J. Nasim, Pitsch Werner, Anto B. Panyin, Eike Emrich, and Claus Jacob. 2020. "Antimalarial Drugs in Ghana: A Case Study on Personal Preferences" Sci 2, no. 3: 49. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/sci2030049

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