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Disentangling Domestication from Food Production Systems in the Neotropics

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Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas da Amazônia, Av. André Araújo, 2936—Petrópolis, Manaus 69067-375, Brazil
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Instituto de Investigaciones en Ecosistemas y Sustentabilidad, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (Campus Morelia), Antigua Carretera a Pátzcuaro No. 8701, Col. Ex Hacienda de San José de la Huerta, Morelia 58190, Mexico
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Departamento Académico de Biología, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional Agraria La Molina, Av. La Molina, s/n—La Molina, Lima 15024, Peru
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Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ecologia, Departamento de Ecologia e Zoologia, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Campus Universitário, s/n—Trindade, Florianópolis 88040-970, Brazil
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Departamento de Ecologia e Zoologia, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Campus Universitário, s/n—Trindade, Florianópolis 88040-970, Brazil
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Jardín Botánico, Instituto de Biología, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Circuito Exterior, Ciudad Universitaria, Coyoacán 04510, Mexico
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Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ecologia, Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas da Amazônia, Av. André Araújo, 2936—Petrópolis, Manaus 69067-375, Brazil
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Programa de Pós-Graduação em Etnobiologia e Conservação da Natureza, Universidade Federal Rural de Pernambuco, Rua Dom Manoel de Medeiros, s/n—Dois Irmãos, Recife 52171-900, Brazil
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Programa de Pós-Graduação em Botânica, Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas da Amazônia, Av. André Araújo, 2936—Petrópolis, Manaus 69067-375, Brazil
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Rua Alegria, 72—Centro, Aracruz 29190-230, Brazil
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Coordinadora de Ciencia y Tecnología en los Andes—CCTA, Camilo Carrillo 300-A, Lima 15072, Peru
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Centro de Investigaciones de Zonas Áridas, Universidad Nacional Agraria La Molina, Jr. Camilo Carrillo 300-A—Jesús María, Lima 15072, Peru
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Centro de Investigación en Biodiversidad y Conservación, Universidad Autónoma del Estado de Morelos, Av. Universidad 1001, Colonia Chamilpa, Cuernavaca 62290, Mexico
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Curso de Graduação em Ciências Biológicas, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Campus Universitário, s/n—Trindade, Florianópolis 88040-970, Brazil
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Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciências de Florestas Tropicais, Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas da Amazônia, Av. André Araújo, 2936—Petrópolis, Manaus 69067-375, Brazil
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Departamento de Biologia Vegetal, Instituto de Biologia, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Rua Charles Darwin, s/n—Cidade Universitária, Campinas 13083-863, Brazil
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Marc Vander Linden
Received: 1 November 2020 / Revised: 14 January 2021 / Accepted: 21 January 2021 / Published: 28 January 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Human Activities and Development of Food Production in the Holocene)
The Neolithic Revolution narrative associates early-mid Holocene domestications with the development of agriculture that fueled the rise of late Holocene civilizations. This narrative continues to be influential, even though it has been deconstructed by archaeologists and geneticists in its homeland. To further disentangle domestication from reliance on food production systems, such as agriculture, we revisit definitions of domestication and food production systems, review the late Pleistocene–early Holocene archaeobotanical record, and quantify the use, management and domestication of Neotropical plants to provide insights about the past. Neotropical plant domestication relies on common human behaviors (selection, accumulation and caring) within agroecological systems that focus on individual plants, rather than populations—as is typical of agriculture. The early archaeobotanical record includes numerous perennial and annual species, many of which later became domesticated. Some of this evidence identifies dispersal with probable cultivation, suggesting incipient domestication by 10,000 years ago. Since the Pleistocene, more than 6500, 1206 and 6261 native plant species have been used in Mesoamerica, the Central Andes and lowland South America, respectively. At least 1555, 428 and 742 are managed outside and inside food production systems, and at least 1148, 428 and 600 are cultivated, respectively, suggesting at least incipient domestication. Full native domesticates are more numerous in Mesoamerica (251) than the Andes (124) and the lowlands (45). This synthesis reveals that domestication is more common in the Neotropics than previously recognized and started much earlier than reliance on food production systems. Hundreds of ethnic groups had, and some still have, alternative strategies that do involve domestication, although they do not rely principally on food production systems, such as agriculture. View Full-Text
Keywords: Amazonia; Andes; cultural niche construction; ethnobotany; ethnoecology; human selection; landscape domestication; Mesoamerica; plant domestication; plant management Amazonia; Andes; cultural niche construction; ethnobotany; ethnoecology; human selection; landscape domestication; Mesoamerica; plant domestication; plant management
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MDPI and ACS Style

Clement, C.R.; Casas, A.; Parra-Rondinel, F.A.; Levis, C.; Peroni, N.; Hanazaki, N.; Cortés-Zárraga, L.; Rangel-Landa, S.; Alves, R.P.; Ferreira, M.J.; Cassino, M.F.; Coelho, S.D.; Cruz-Soriano, A.; Pancorbo-Olivera, M.; Blancas, J.; Martínez-Ballesté, A.; Lemes, G.; Lotero-Velásquez, E.; Bertin, V.M.; Mazzochini, G.G. Disentangling Domestication from Food Production Systems in the Neotropics. Quaternary 2021, 4, 4. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/quat4010004

AMA Style

Clement CR, Casas A, Parra-Rondinel FA, Levis C, Peroni N, Hanazaki N, Cortés-Zárraga L, Rangel-Landa S, Alves RP, Ferreira MJ, Cassino MF, Coelho SD, Cruz-Soriano A, Pancorbo-Olivera M, Blancas J, Martínez-Ballesté A, Lemes G, Lotero-Velásquez E, Bertin VM, Mazzochini GG. Disentangling Domestication from Food Production Systems in the Neotropics. Quaternary. 2021; 4(1):4. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/quat4010004

Chicago/Turabian Style

Clement, Charles R., Alejandro Casas, Fabiola A. Parra-Rondinel, Carolina Levis, Nivaldo Peroni, Natalia Hanazaki, Laura Cortés-Zárraga, Selene Rangel-Landa, Rubana P. Alves, Maria J. Ferreira, Mariana F. Cassino, Sara D. Coelho, Aldo Cruz-Soriano, Marggiori Pancorbo-Olivera, José Blancas, Andrea Martínez-Ballesté, Gustavo Lemes, Elisa Lotero-Velásquez, Vinicius M. Bertin, and Guilherme G. Mazzochini 2021. "Disentangling Domestication from Food Production Systems in the Neotropics" Quaternary 4, no. 1: 4. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/quat4010004

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