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Article

Ethnoarchaeology of Introducing Agriculture and Social Continuity among Sedentarised Hunter–Gatherers: The Transition from the Jomon to the Yayoi Period

National Museum of Ethnology, Osaka 565-8511, Japan
Academic Editor: José Javier Baena Preysler
Received: 6 July 2021 / Revised: 25 August 2021 / Accepted: 30 August 2021 / Published: 14 September 2021
This study was conducted to elucidate the introduction of agriculture and social continuity from the Jomon to the Yayoi period, from an ethnoarchaeological perspective. The Yayoi period has been divided into two types: a broad spectrum economy that relied on many kinds of resources, such as rice, millet, and nuts, and a selective economy that specialised in rice and wild boar. However, it is not clear how the livelihoods shifted from the Jomon to the Yayoi period. In this study, ethnohistorical materials were examined first. Ethnohistorical reference materials gathered worldwide have revealed three relationships between hunter–gatherers and farmers: coexistence, fusion, and assimilation. Focusing on fusion, this study examined situations of hunting, gathering, and fishing, as inferred from ruins of the Late and Final Jomon period, and assessed their relationships with agriculture using ethnohistorical reference materials of the Early Edo period. There were not many social changes caused by the introduction of field farming; however, the introduction of paddy rice cultivation had different effects on society depending on the level of investment in obtaining water from streams and springs and creating irrigation features. View Full-Text
Keywords: dry-field farming; first farmers; Jomon; paddy rice farming; sedentarised hunter-gatherers; Yayoi dry-field farming; first farmers; Jomon; paddy rice farming; sedentarised hunter-gatherers; Yayoi
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MDPI and ACS Style

Ikeya, K. Ethnoarchaeology of Introducing Agriculture and Social Continuity among Sedentarised Hunter–Gatherers: The Transition from the Jomon to the Yayoi Period. Quaternary 2021, 4, 28. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/quat4030028

AMA Style

Ikeya K. Ethnoarchaeology of Introducing Agriculture and Social Continuity among Sedentarised Hunter–Gatherers: The Transition from the Jomon to the Yayoi Period. Quaternary. 2021; 4(3):28. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/quat4030028

Chicago/Turabian Style

Ikeya, Kazunobu. 2021. "Ethnoarchaeology of Introducing Agriculture and Social Continuity among Sedentarised Hunter–Gatherers: The Transition from the Jomon to the Yayoi Period" Quaternary 4, no. 3: 28. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/quat4030028

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