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Review

Phosphorus Transport along the Cropland–Riparian–Stream Continuum in Cold Climate Agroecosystems: A Review

1
USDA-ARS, Institute for Environmentally Integrated Dairy Management, Marshfield, WI 54449, USA
2
Department of Plant and Soil Science, University of Vermont, Burlington, VT 05405, USA
3
Department of Plant and Soil Sciences, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716, USA
4
Department of Sustainable Resources Management, SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry, Syracuse, NY 13201, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Rick Wilkin and Peter Leinweber
Received: 1 January 2021 / Revised: 4 March 2021 / Accepted: 5 March 2021 / Published: 9 March 2021
Phosphorus (P) loss from cropland to ground and surface waters is a global concern. In cold climates (CCs), freeze–thaw cycles, snowmelt runoff events, and seasonally wet soils increase P loss potential while limiting P removal effectiveness of riparian buffer zones (RBZs) and other practices. While RBZs can help reduce particulate P transfer to streams, attenuation of dissolved P forms is more challenging. Moreover, P transport studies often focus on either cropland or RBZs exclusively rather than spanning the natural cropland–RBZ–stream gradient, defined here as the cropland–RBZ–stream continuum. Watershed P transport models and agronomic P site indices are commonly used to identify critical source areas; however, RBZ effects on P transport are usually not included. In addition, the coarse resolution of watershed P models may not capture finer-scale soil factors affecting P mobilization. It is clear that site microtopography and hydrology are closely linked and important drivers of P release and transport in overland flow. Combining light detection and ranging (LiDAR) based digital elevation models with P site indices and process-based models show promise for mapping and modeling P transport risk in cropland-RBZ areas; however, a better mechanistic understanding of processes controlling mobile P species across regions is needed. Broader predictive approaches integrating soil hydro-biogeochemical processes with real-time hydroclimatic data and risk assessment tools also hold promise for improving P transport risk assessment in CCs. View Full-Text
Keywords: phosphorus; agriculture; biogeochemistry; riparian buffers; critical source areas; nutrient management; overland flow; hydropedology; snowmelt; streamflow; tile drainage; water quality phosphorus; agriculture; biogeochemistry; riparian buffers; critical source areas; nutrient management; overland flow; hydropedology; snowmelt; streamflow; tile drainage; water quality
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MDPI and ACS Style

Young, E.O.; Ross, D.S.; Jaisi, D.P.; Vidon, P.G. Phosphorus Transport along the Cropland–Riparian–Stream Continuum in Cold Climate Agroecosystems: A Review. Soil Syst. 2021, 5, 15. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/soilsystems5010015

AMA Style

Young EO, Ross DS, Jaisi DP, Vidon PG. Phosphorus Transport along the Cropland–Riparian–Stream Continuum in Cold Climate Agroecosystems: A Review. Soil Systems. 2021; 5(1):15. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/soilsystems5010015

Chicago/Turabian Style

Young, Eric O., Donald S. Ross, Deb P. Jaisi, and Philippe G. Vidon 2021. "Phosphorus Transport along the Cropland–Riparian–Stream Continuum in Cold Climate Agroecosystems: A Review" Soil Systems 5, no. 1: 15. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/soilsystems5010015

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