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Article

Have Sustained Acidic Deposition Decreases Led to Increased Calcium Availability in Recovering Watersheds of the Adirondack Region of New York, USA?

U.S. Geological Survey, New York Water Science Center, 425 Jordan Road, Troy, NY 12180, USA
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Received: 24 September 2020 / Revised: 17 January 2021 / Accepted: 18 January 2021 / Published: 23 January 2021
Soil calcium depletion has been strongly linked to acidic deposition in eastern North America and recent studies have begun to document the recovery of soils in response to large decreases in acidic deposition. However, increased calcium availability has not yet been seen in the B horizon, where calcium depletion has been most acute, but mineral weathering is critically important for resupplying ecosystem calcium. This study provides new data in seven watersheds in the Adirondack region (New York, USA), where acidic deposition impacts on soils and surface waters have been substantial and recovery remains slow. Initial sampling in 1997–1998 and 2003–2004 was repeated in 2009–2010, 2014, 2016 and 2017. Exchangeable calcium concentrations increased by an average of 43% in the Oe horizon of three watersheds where this horizon was sampled (10.7–15.3 cmolc kg−1). Changes in calcium were not seen in the individual watersheds of the Oa and B horizons, but as a group, a significant increase in calcium was measured in the upper B horizon. Liming of a calcium-depleted watershed also tripled calcium concentration in the upper B horizon in 5 years. However, stream calcium in unlimed watersheds decreased over the study period. Small increases in B-horizon calcium may be underway. View Full-Text
Keywords: soil calcium; acidic deposition recovery; watershed liming; soil aluminum; forest soil recovery; soil monitoring; base saturation soil calcium; acidic deposition recovery; watershed liming; soil aluminum; forest soil recovery; soil monitoring; base saturation
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MDPI and ACS Style

Lawrence, G.; Siemion, J.; Antidormi, M.; Bonville, D.; McHale, M. Have Sustained Acidic Deposition Decreases Led to Increased Calcium Availability in Recovering Watersheds of the Adirondack Region of New York, USA? Soil Syst. 2021, 5, 6. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/soilsystems5010006

AMA Style

Lawrence G, Siemion J, Antidormi M, Bonville D, McHale M. Have Sustained Acidic Deposition Decreases Led to Increased Calcium Availability in Recovering Watersheds of the Adirondack Region of New York, USA? Soil Systems. 2021; 5(1):6. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/soilsystems5010006

Chicago/Turabian Style

Lawrence, Gregory, Jason Siemion, Michael Antidormi, Donald Bonville, and Michael McHale. 2021. "Have Sustained Acidic Deposition Decreases Led to Increased Calcium Availability in Recovering Watersheds of the Adirondack Region of New York, USA?" Soil Systems 5, no. 1: 6. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/soilsystems5010006

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