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Article

Median Arcuate Ligament Syndrome Clinical Presentation, Pathophysiology, and Management: Description of Four Cases

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Division of Gastroenterology, Paul L Foster School of Medicine, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center El Paso, El Paso, TX 79905, USA
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Department of Internal Medicine, Paul L Foster School of Medicine, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center El Paso, El Paso, TX 79905, USA
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Department of Surgery, Paul L Foster School of Medicine, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center El Paso, El Paso, TX 79905, USA
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Department of Radiology, Paul L Foster School of Medicine, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center El Paso, El Paso, TX 79905, USA
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Center for Neurogastroenterology and GI Motility, Paul L Foster School of Medicine, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center El Paso, El Paso, TX 79905, USA
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Gastrointest. Disord. 2021, 3(1), 44-50; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/gidisord3010005
Received: 23 December 2020 / Revised: 29 January 2021 / Accepted: 10 February 2021 / Published: 26 February 2021
Median arcuate ligament syndrome (MALS), otherwise called celiac artery compression syndrome (CACS), is an uncommon disorder that results from an anatomical compression of the celiac axis and/or celiac ganglion by the MAL. Patients typically present with abdominal pain of unknown etiology exacerbated by eating along with nausea, vomiting, and weight loss. MALS is a diagnosis of exclusion that should be considered in patients with severe upper abdominal pain, which does not correlate with the objective findings. The cardinal feature which is elicited in the diagnosis of MALS relies on imaging studies of the celiac artery, demonstrating narrowing during expiration. The definitive treatment is the median arcuate ligament’s surgical release to achieve surgical decompression of the celiac plexus by division of the MAL. This article describes our experience with this entity, focusing on symptom presentation, diagnostic challenges, and management, including long-term follow-up in four cases. View Full-Text
Keywords: case series; celiac artery; celiac plexus; median arcuate ligament; clinical presentation; pathophysiology; management case series; celiac artery; celiac plexus; median arcuate ligament; clinical presentation; pathophysiology; management
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MDPI and ACS Style

Bayati, I.A.; Gajendran, M.; Davis, B.R.; Diaz, J.R.; McCallum, R.W. Median Arcuate Ligament Syndrome Clinical Presentation, Pathophysiology, and Management: Description of Four Cases. Gastrointest. Disord. 2021, 3, 44-50. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/gidisord3010005

AMA Style

Bayati IA, Gajendran M, Davis BR, Diaz JR, McCallum RW. Median Arcuate Ligament Syndrome Clinical Presentation, Pathophysiology, and Management: Description of Four Cases. Gastrointestinal Disorders. 2021; 3(1):44-50. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/gidisord3010005

Chicago/Turabian Style

Bayati, Ihsan A., Mahesh Gajendran, Brian R. Davis, Jesus R. Diaz, and Richard W. McCallum 2021. "Median Arcuate Ligament Syndrome Clinical Presentation, Pathophysiology, and Management: Description of Four Cases" Gastrointestinal Disorders 3, no. 1: 44-50. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/gidisord3010005

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