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Gastrointest. Disord., Volume 3, Issue 2 (June 2021) – 3 articles

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Review
Surveillance of Colorectal Cancer (CRC) in Cystic Fibrosis (CF) Patients
Gastrointest. Disord. 2021, 3(2), 84-95; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/gidisord3020009 - 25 May 2021
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Abstract
Cystic Fibrosis (CF) is the commonest inherited genetic disorder in Caucasians due to a mutation in the gene CFTR (Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator), and it should be considered as an Inherited Colorectal Cancer (CRC) Syndrome. In the United States, physicians of CF [...] Read more.
Cystic Fibrosis (CF) is the commonest inherited genetic disorder in Caucasians due to a mutation in the gene CFTR (Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator), and it should be considered as an Inherited Colorectal Cancer (CRC) Syndrome. In the United States, physicians of CF Foundation established the “Developing Innovative Gastroenterology Speciality Training Program” to increase the research on CF in gastrointestinal and hepatobiliary diseases. The risk to develop a CRC is 5–10 times higher in CF patients than in the general population and even greater in CF patients receiving immunosuppressive therapy due to organ transplantation (30-fold increased risk relative to the general population). Colonoscopy should be considered the best screening for CRC in CF patients. The screening colonoscopy should be started at the age of 40 in CF patients and, if negative, a new colonoscopy should be performed every 5 years and every 3 years if adenomas are detected. For transplanted CF patients, the screening colonoscopy could be started at the age of 35, in transplanted patients at the age of 30 and, if before, at the age of 30. CF transplanted patients, between the age of 35 and 55, must repeat colonoscopy every 3 years. Our review draws attention towards the clinically relevant development of CRC in CF patients, and it may pave the way for further screenings and studies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Therapeutic Targets for the Treatment of Colorectal Cancer)
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Communication
Development of a Motility Frailty Index in Patients with Gastroparesis
Gastrointest. Disord. 2021, 3(2), 78-83; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/gidisord3020008 - 25 Apr 2021
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Abstract
Introduction: Patients with symptoms (Sx) of gastrointestinal (GI) motor disorders have limitations in physical strength and mobility. We hypothesized that physical frailty correlated with severity of GI symptoms, and that a motility frailty index (MFI) could be constructed. Patients: We conducted a prospective [...] Read more.
Introduction: Patients with symptoms (Sx) of gastrointestinal (GI) motor disorders have limitations in physical strength and mobility. We hypothesized that physical frailty correlated with severity of GI symptoms, and that a motility frailty index (MFI) could be constructed. Patients: We conducted a prospective pilot study on 40 patients, (38 F, 2 M, mean age 39.9 years) with the following diagnoses: 10 with diabetes mellitus and 30 with non-diabetic/idiopathic disorders. Upper and lower GI Sx were quantified using an FDA-compliant, traditional patient-reported outcomes (PRO) system. Methods: Patients underwent a series of physical performance measures involving standing balance (SB), usual walk speed (UW), and chair sit-and-stands (CS). A GI motility frailty index (MFI) was constructed by fitting several models with a combination of physical performance measures and correlating with PRO. Pearson’s correlation compared the constructed index with the GI Sx PRO to construct a GI MFI. Results: The studied patients collectively showed marked limitations in mobility compared with standard performance values with mean (sd) ratios of SB = 0.87 (0.20), UW = 0.45 (0.13), and CS = 0.38 (0.17). Correlations between physical mobility and GI Sx were noted for upper GI Sx (rho = 0.47, p = 0.002) but not for lower GI Sx. Conclusions: In this pilot study of patients with GI motility disorders, we found increased physical limitations on performance-based testing, which had a statistically significant positive correlation with severity of upper GI motor Sx using a standardized PRO system. A motility frailty index has been constructed that may serve as a basis for better quantifying limitations in patient mobility. Full article
Review
Overview of Self-Management Skills and Associated Assessment Tools for Children with Inflammatory Bowel Disease
Gastrointest. Disord. 2021, 3(2), 61-77; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/gidisord3020007 - 30 Mar 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 539
Abstract
Self-management is a multi-modal approach for managing chronic conditions that encompasses a number of different elements; knowledge, adherence, self-regulation, communication, and cognitive factors. Self-management has been shown to be beneficial for adults with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and for children with IBD it [...] Read more.
Self-management is a multi-modal approach for managing chronic conditions that encompasses a number of different elements; knowledge, adherence, self-regulation, communication, and cognitive factors. Self-management has been shown to be beneficial for adults with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and for children with IBD it may help them learn to take control of their complex treatment regimens and lead to positive disease outcomes. The development of self-management skills for children with IBD is vital in order to maximize their potential for health autonomy, but it is still an emergent field in this population. This review provides an over-arching view of the self-management elements specific to children with IBD, and highlights outcome measures that may be used to assess skills within each field as well as the efficacy of targeted interventions. Full article
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