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Climate Change and Enteric Infections in the Canadian Arctic: Do We Know What’s on the Horizon?

1
Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z3, Canada
2
Faculty of Health Sciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON L8S 4K1, Canada
3
School of Public Health, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB T6G 1C9, Canada
4
J.D. MacLean Centre for Tropical Diseases, McGill University, Montreal, QC H4A 3J1, Canada
5
Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, BC Children’s and Women’s Hospital and University of British, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z7, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Both authors contributed equally.
Academic Editor: Takuji Tanaka
Gastrointest. Disord. 2021, 3(3), 113-126; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/gidisord3030012
Received: 5 July 2021 / Revised: 2 August 2021 / Accepted: 4 August 2021 / Published: 10 August 2021
The Canadian Arctic has a long history with diarrheal disease, including outbreaks of campylobacteriosis, giardiasis, and salmonellosis. Due to climate change, the Canadian Arctic is experiencing rapid environmental transformation, which not only threatens the livelihood of local Indigenous Peoples, but also supports the spread, frequency, and intensity of enteric pathogen outbreaks. Advances in diagnostic testing and detection have brought to attention the current burden of disease due to Cryptosporidium, Campylobacter, and Helicobacter pylori. As climate change is known to influence pathogen transmission (e.g., food and water), Arctic communities need support in developing prevention and surveillance strategies that are culturally appropriate. This review aims to provide an overview of how climate change is currently and is expected to impact enteric pathogens in the Canadian Arctic. View Full-Text
Keywords: climate change; enteric pathogens; gastrointestinal infections; Canadian arctic climate change; enteric pathogens; gastrointestinal infections; Canadian arctic
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MDPI and ACS Style

Finlayson-Trick, E.; Barker, B.; Manji, S.; Harper, S.L.; Yansouni, C.P.; Goldfarb, D.M. Climate Change and Enteric Infections in the Canadian Arctic: Do We Know What’s on the Horizon? Gastrointest. Disord. 2021, 3, 113-126. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/gidisord3030012

AMA Style

Finlayson-Trick E, Barker B, Manji S, Harper SL, Yansouni CP, Goldfarb DM. Climate Change and Enteric Infections in the Canadian Arctic: Do We Know What’s on the Horizon? Gastrointestinal Disorders. 2021; 3(3):113-126. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/gidisord3030012

Chicago/Turabian Style

Finlayson-Trick, Emma, Bronwyn Barker, Selina Manji, Sherilee L. Harper, Cedric P. Yansouni, and David M. Goldfarb 2021. "Climate Change and Enteric Infections in the Canadian Arctic: Do We Know What’s on the Horizon?" Gastrointestinal Disorders 3, no. 3: 113-126. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/gidisord3030012

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