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Numerical Study of the Drying of Cassava Roots Chips Using an Indirect Solar Dryer in Natural Convection

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INRAE, LERMAB, ERBE—F, 88000 Epinal, France
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Nancy-Metz Academy, 54035, 2 rue Philippe de Gueldres, 54000 Nancy, France
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Department of Science, University of Yaoundé I, Yaoundé P.O. Box 812, Cameroon
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Department of Agricultural and Bioresources Engineering, Michael Okpara University of Agriculture, Umuahia P.M.B. 7267, Abia State, Nigeria
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Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of New Brunswick, 15 Dineen Drive, Fredericton, NB E3B 5A3, Canada
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Department of Chemistry, College of Sciences, University of Hafr Al Batin, Hafr Al Batin 39524, Saudi Arabia
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Université de Lorraine, INRAE, LERMAB, ERBE—F, 88000 Epinal, France
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 17 February 2021 / Revised: 3 March 2021 / Accepted: 5 March 2021 / Published: 17 March 2021
In this work, an indirect solar dryer for drying cassava root chips was modelled and experimentally validated using the environmental conditions of Yaoundé in Cameroon and Yamoussoukro in Ivory Coast. The dryers were operational in natural convection mode. Resolution of the equations was achieved by finite differences and the 4th order of Runge–Kutta methods. A model was proposed for performing heat and mass transfer using thermophysical properties of cassava roots, and the obtained results were satisfactory for all conditions, with moisture content difference of less than 0.2 kg/kg between the experimental and theoretical results. The model showed that the core of the product takes more time to dry, which always prolongs the drying duration. The heat and mass transfer coefficients vary during the entire process of solar drying. The drying kinetics vary during the drying with values lower than 1.2 × 10−4 kg/(kg.s). The great gradients of humidity were observed in the thickness of the sample with a regular distribution of the temperature each drying time in the thickness of the sample. View Full-Text
Keywords: cassava roots; desorption isotherms; drying kinetics; heat and mass transfer; natural convection; solar dryer; Sub-Saharan Africa cassava roots; desorption isotherms; drying kinetics; heat and mass transfer; natural convection; solar dryer; Sub-Saharan Africa
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MDPI and ACS Style

Simo-Tagne, M.; Tagne Tagne, A.; Ndukwu, M.C.; Bennamoun, L.; Obounou Akong, M.B.; El Marouani, M.; Rogaume, Y. Numerical Study of the Drying of Cassava Roots Chips Using an Indirect Solar Dryer in Natural Convection. AgriEngineering 2021, 3, 138-157. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/agriengineering3010009

AMA Style

Simo-Tagne M, Tagne Tagne A, Ndukwu MC, Bennamoun L, Obounou Akong MB, El Marouani M, Rogaume Y. Numerical Study of the Drying of Cassava Roots Chips Using an Indirect Solar Dryer in Natural Convection. AgriEngineering. 2021; 3(1):138-157. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/agriengineering3010009

Chicago/Turabian Style

Simo-Tagne, Merlin, Ablain Tagne Tagne, Macmanus C. Ndukwu, Lyes Bennamoun, Marcel B. Obounou Akong, Maryam El Marouani, and Yann Rogaume. 2021. "Numerical Study of the Drying of Cassava Roots Chips Using an Indirect Solar Dryer in Natural Convection" AgriEngineering 3, no. 1: 138-157. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/agriengineering3010009

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