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Growth of Basil (Ocimum basilicum) in DRF, Raft, and Grow Pipes with Effluents of African Catfish (Clarias gariepinus) in Decoupled Aquaponics
Article

Growth of Basil (Ocimum basilicum) in Aeroponics, DRF, and Raft Systems with Effluents of African Catfish (Clarias gariepinus) in Decoupled Aquaponics (s.s.)

1
Department of Aquaculture and Sea-Ranching, Faculty of Agricultural and Environmental Science, University of Rostock, D-18059 Rostock, Germany
2
French Associates Institute for Agriculture and Biotechnology of Drylands, Jacob Blaustein Institutes for Desert Research, Sede Boqer Campus, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Midreshet Ben-Gurion, Beersheba 8499000, Israel
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally to this work.
Academic Editor: Eugenio Cavallo
Received: 5 June 2021 / Revised: 8 July 2021 / Accepted: 12 July 2021 / Published: 15 July 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Aquaponics: Advancing Food Production Systems for the World)
Basil (Ocimum basilicum) was cultivated in three hydroponic subsystems (i) a modified commercial aeroponics, (ii) a dynamic root floating (DRF) system, and (iii) a floating raft system in a decoupled aquaponic system in Northern Germany, Mecklenburg–Western Pomerania. For plant nutrition, aquaculture process water from intensive rearing of African catfish (Clarias gariepinus) was used without fertilizer. After 39 days, 16 plant growth parameters were compared, with aeroponics performing significantly better in 11 parameters compared with the DRF, and better compared with the raft in 13 parameters. The economically important leaf wet and dry weight was over 40% higher in aeroponics (28.53 ± 8.74 g; 4.26 ± 1.23 g), but similar in the DRF (20.19 ± 6.57 g; 2.83 ± 0.90 g) and raft (20.35 ± 7.14 g; 2.84 ± 1.04 g). The roots in the DRF grew shorter and thicker; however, this resulted in a higher root dry weight in aeroponics (1.08 ± 0.38 g) compared with the DRF (0.82 ± 0.36 g) and raft (0.67 ± 0.27 g). With optimal fertilizer and system improvement, aquaponic aeroponics (s.s.) could become a productive and sustainable large-scale food production system in the future. Due to its simple construction, the raft is ideal for domestic or semi-commercial use and can be used in areas where water is neither scarce nor expensive. The DRF system is particularly suitable for basil cultivation under hot tropical conditions. View Full-Text
Keywords: basil; African catfish; dynamic root floating technique (DRF); floating raft; deep flow technique (DFT); aeroponics; aquaponics; hydroponics basil; African catfish; dynamic root floating technique (DRF); floating raft; deep flow technique (DFT); aeroponics; aquaponics; hydroponics
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MDPI and ACS Style

Pasch, J.; Appelbaum, S.; Palm, H.W.; Knaus, U. Growth of Basil (Ocimum basilicum) in Aeroponics, DRF, and Raft Systems with Effluents of African Catfish (Clarias gariepinus) in Decoupled Aquaponics (s.s.). AgriEngineering 2021, 3, 559-574. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/agriengineering3030036

AMA Style

Pasch J, Appelbaum S, Palm HW, Knaus U. Growth of Basil (Ocimum basilicum) in Aeroponics, DRF, and Raft Systems with Effluents of African Catfish (Clarias gariepinus) in Decoupled Aquaponics (s.s.). AgriEngineering. 2021; 3(3):559-574. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/agriengineering3030036

Chicago/Turabian Style

Pasch, Johannes, Samuel Appelbaum, Harry W. Palm, and Ulrich Knaus. 2021. "Growth of Basil (Ocimum basilicum) in Aeroponics, DRF, and Raft Systems with Effluents of African Catfish (Clarias gariepinus) in Decoupled Aquaponics (s.s.)" AgriEngineering 3, no. 3: 559-574. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/agriengineering3030036

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