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A Framework for Studying Hydrology-Driven Landslide Hazards in Northwestern US Using Satellite InSAR, Precipitation and Soil Moisture Observations: Early Results and Future Directions

by * and
Roy M. Huffington Department of Earth Sciences, Southern Methodist University, Dallas, TX 75275, USA
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Kevin Schmidt
Received: 5 March 2021 / Revised: 17 April 2021 / Accepted: 20 April 2021 / Published: 22 April 2021
The mountainous Pacific Northwest is prone to heavy winter rainfall, resulting in hundreds of landslides per year, human casualties, and billions of dollars of property damage. Precipitation is a major hydrologic trigger for landslides in the northwestern US and around the world. This paper reviews existing literature to outline a framework to study the linkage between precipitation and landslide hazards over the northwestern US using satellite remote sensing techniques including interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) methods, Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite precipitation products, and Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) satellite soil moisture data, along with correlation analysis and numerical modeling. InSAR time-series displacements provide an indication of landslide occurrence and extent, and help characterize the basal slip surface and slide-body volume based on the law of mass conservation. Precipitation and soil moisture sensed from the space and ground contribute to creating hydrogeological models associated with water infiltration. These crucial parameters are tracked through correlation and slope stability analysis to understand landslide dynamics. We highlight the results on mapping landslides over the state of Washington and analyses at a few select sites over southern Washington and southwestern Oregon. We conclude that satellite observations of landslide motions and the attributing hydrological variables from both radar and optical images improve our understanding of the inter-relationships between the hydrologic processes along with topographic and geologic settings, and the landslide kinematics and mechanisms inferred from time-series measurements and landslide modeling on a regional scale. View Full-Text
Keywords: interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR); landslide; precipitation; soil moisture; hazards interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR); landslide; precipitation; soil moisture; hazards
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MDPI and ACS Style

Lu, Z.; Kim, J. A Framework for Studying Hydrology-Driven Landslide Hazards in Northwestern US Using Satellite InSAR, Precipitation and Soil Moisture Observations: Early Results and Future Directions. GeoHazards 2021, 2, 17-40. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/geohazards2020002

AMA Style

Lu Z, Kim J. A Framework for Studying Hydrology-Driven Landslide Hazards in Northwestern US Using Satellite InSAR, Precipitation and Soil Moisture Observations: Early Results and Future Directions. GeoHazards. 2021; 2(2):17-40. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/geohazards2020002

Chicago/Turabian Style

Lu, Zhong, and Jinwoo Kim. 2021. "A Framework for Studying Hydrology-Driven Landslide Hazards in Northwestern US Using Satellite InSAR, Precipitation and Soil Moisture Observations: Early Results and Future Directions" GeoHazards 2, no. 2: 17-40. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/geohazards2020002

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