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Psych, Volume 3, Issue 1 (March 2021) – 4 articles

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Article
Adaptation and Validation of a Short Acculturation Scale in a Multi-Ethnic Asian Population
Psych 2021, 3(1), 25-38; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/psych3010004 - 26 Feb 2021
Viewed by 787
Abstract
The Short Acculturation Scale (SAS) has been widely used for assessing the level of the acculturation of migrants in Western countries. However, the validity of SAS for use in cosmopolitan settings without a single prevailing culture is unclear. We examined the validity and [...] Read more.
The Short Acculturation Scale (SAS) has been widely used for assessing the level of the acculturation of migrants in Western countries. However, the validity of SAS for use in cosmopolitan settings without a single prevailing culture is unclear. We examined the validity and reliability of a version of the SAS adapted to a multi-ethnic Asian society. We used cross-sectional data from 12,610 Singaporean citizens and permanent residents, aged 21–75 years, of Chinese, Malay, and Indian ethnicity. Our version used 11 items, with 5 questions on language use, 3 on media use, and 3 on ethnic social relations, to measure acculturation. Our version of the SAS had good internal consistency. The three-factor CFA model had a good fit to our data. The results from the multiple group CFA supported metric invariance and partial scalar invariance across the three ethnic groups. The total score was positively correlated with generation in Singapore and the number of languages spoken. Among first generation immigrants, country of origin, but not the duration of residence was significantly associated with the acculturation score. Our three-factor version of the SAS is a reliable and valid tool for measuring acculturation in Singapore residents. These findings indicate that adapted SAS can be used to assess acculturation in multicultural settings. Full article
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Article
Correcting the Correction: A Revised Formula to Estimate Partial Correlations between True Scores
Psych 2021, 3(1), 19-24; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/psych3010003 - 31 Jan 2021
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Abstract
Bohrnstedt’s (1969) attempt to derive a formula to compute the partial correlation coefficient and simultaneously correct for attenuation sought to simplify the process of performing each task separately. He suggested that his formula, developed from algebraic and psychometric manipulations of the partial correlation [...] Read more.
Bohrnstedt’s (1969) attempt to derive a formula to compute the partial correlation coefficient and simultaneously correct for attenuation sought to simplify the process of performing each task separately. He suggested that his formula, developed from algebraic and psychometric manipulations of the partial correlation coefficient, produces a corrected partial correlation value. However, an algebraic error exists within his derivations. Consequently, the formula proposed by Bohrnstedt does not appropriately represent the value he intended it to estimate. By correcting the erroneous step and continuing the derivation based upon his proposed procedure, the steps outlined in this paper ultimately produce the formula that Bohrnstedt desired. Full article
(This article belongs to the Section Psychometrics and Educational Measurement)
Editorial
Acknowledgment to Reviewers of Psych in 2020
Psych 2021, 3(1), 18; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/psych3010002 - 26 Jan 2021
Viewed by 527
Abstract
Peer review is the driving force of journal development, and reviewers are gatekeepers who ensure that Psych maintains its standards for the high quality of its published papers [...] Full article
Article
The Influence of Regulatory Focus on Media Choice in Interpersonal Conflicts
Psych 2021, 3(1), 1-17; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/psych3010001 - 08 Jan 2021
Viewed by 732
Abstract
People’s choices of (electronic) communication channels are central to the quality of communication—and sometimes detrimental to their actual communication goals. However, while factors influencing media choice are abundant, potential means to intentionally influence these choices are scarce within computer-mediated communication research. We explore [...] Read more.
People’s choices of (electronic) communication channels are central to the quality of communication—and sometimes detrimental to their actual communication goals. However, while factors influencing media choice are abundant, potential means to intentionally influence these choices are scarce within computer-mediated communication research. We explore the role of regulatory focus as one possible factor to understand and influence media choice in interpersonal conflicts. Regulatory focus theory proposes two motivational systems, promotion (i.e., needs for nurturance and growth) and prevention (i.e., needs for safety and security), that account for differences in preferred strategies for goal-pursuit. In a vignette-based study, we manipulated the situational regulatory focus (promotion or prevention) and surveyed participants’ preferred media choice for a hypothetical conflict scenario. Our results show that the induction of a dominant prevention focus (vs. promotion focus) leads to a shift in preference towards leaner communication media and channels that establish a higher subjective buffer between sender and receiver (e.g., text-messaging over calling). We elaborate on how these findings contribute to the understanding of media choice in interpersonal conflicts and point out potential ways to influence behavior through the design of communication technologies. Limitations of the present study and future research opportunities are discussed. Full article
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