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Prosthesis, Volume 3, Issue 1 (March 2021) – 11 articles

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Open AccessEditorial
Christian von Mechel’s Reconstructive Drawings of the Second “Iron Hand” of Franconian Knight Gottfried (Götz) von Berlichingen (1480–1562)
Prosthesis 2021, 3(1), 105-109; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/prosthesis3010011 - 23 Mar 2021
Viewed by 321
Abstract
In our recent review [...] Full article
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Open AccessPerspective
The New Elderly Patient: A Necessary Upgrade
Prosthesis 2021, 3(1), 99-104; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/prosthesis3010010 - 15 Mar 2021
Viewed by 297
Abstract
The elderly individual is becoming the most common patient in clinical practice due to the increasing average life span, especially in developed countries. The current elderly patients are different from those of some decades ago. They usually have an active social life, want [...] Read more.
The elderly individual is becoming the most common patient in clinical practice due to the increasing average life span, especially in developed countries. The current elderly patients are different from those of some decades ago. They usually have an active social life, want to be informed, and are actively involved in the current society with consequent high expectations for medical and dental treatment. However, not all the elderly patients are like this. Some of them show limited financial resources, reduced mental and manual skills, and poor motivation. The purpose of this communication is to make a brief characterization of the new elderly population in view of prosthetic and dental management. Full article
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Open AccessReview
Comparison of Canine-Guided Occlusion with Other Occlusal Schemes in Removable Complete Dentures: A Systematic Review
Prosthesis 2021, 3(1), 85-98; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/prosthesis3010009 (registering DOI) - 11 Mar 2021
Viewed by 342
Abstract
Choosing an adequate occlusion is challenging during the construction of artificial dentures, and critical for patient satisfaction. However, there is no conclusive evidence to support which occlusal design is more appropriate. The aim of this systematic review was to evaluate canine-guided occlusion in [...] Read more.
Choosing an adequate occlusion is challenging during the construction of artificial dentures, and critical for patient satisfaction. However, there is no conclusive evidence to support which occlusal design is more appropriate. The aim of this systematic review was to evaluate canine-guided occlusion in comparison to other occlusal schemes in removable complete denture wearers. The review was conducted according to the Preferred Reported Items for Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis (PRISMA) guidelines. An extensive search was carried out on (PubMed (National Library of Medicine)), Scopus (Elsevier), Cochrane collaboration (Wiley), Science Direct (Elsevier) and Europe PMC (European Bioinformatics Institute). English and non-English studies were identified using keywords on canine-guided occlusion, denture occlusion, dental occlusion and artificial occlusal schemes. Out of 1759 articles searched, 18 were selected based on the inclusion criteria. The included studies were interpreted for the descriptive analysis for the calculation of occlusal schemes, occlusion assessment parameters, the outcome of the occlusal schemes and types of removable prosthesis used. The systematic analysis of occlusal schemes revealed that canine-guided occlusion is viable compared with other occlusal designs in terms of patient satisfaction, mastication, retention, esthetics, phonetics, oral-health-related quality of life and muscle activity. The type of occlusal scheme influences the complete denture patient’s’ masticatory efficiency, satisfaction, retention, phonetics and esthetics. Nevertheless, physical, physiological, mechanical and psychological factors play a vital role in the success of removable complete dentures. The canine-guided occlusal scheme is preferred because of its simplicity, less time consumption, good masticatory performance, ease of fabrication and modification into bilateral balanced occlusion if required. Further studies are required to reduce the controversies related to jaw relations, gnathology and occlusal schemes in complete dentures. Full article
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Open AccessPerspective
Bioactivity—Symphony or Cacophony? A Personal View of a Tangled Field
Prosthesis 2021, 3(1), 75-84; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/prosthesis3010008 - 02 Mar 2021
Viewed by 404
Abstract
In the pursuit of better treatments, the concept of a chemically-active material, responding to local conditions by causing reactions, or reacting to produce substances that are deemed beneficial, seems laudable. Ultimately, the goal appears to be to recruit natural biological processes such that [...] Read more.
In the pursuit of better treatments, the concept of a chemically-active material, responding to local conditions by causing reactions, or reacting to produce substances that are deemed beneficial, seems laudable. Ultimately, the goal appears to be to recruit natural biological processes such that a natural ‘repair’ is effected. This goal seems to be the reason for prefixing “bio-” to many terms with a view to advertising the desire, yet without presenting evidence that it has occurred, or indeed that it is capable of occurring, relying instead on non-biological processes to justify the claims. The dogma is such that all work where local ‘responsive’ chemistry is involved must receive the label “bioactive” to legitimize and promote. Nevertheless, the primary evidence adduced is flawed, and the claim must fail. A rethink to restore scientific sense and confidence in the endeavour is essential if real progress is to be made. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioactive Materials for Dental and Maxillofacial Repair)
Open AccessReview
Therapeutic Role of Nystatin Added to Tissue Conditioners for Treating Denture-Induced Stomatitis: A Systematic Review
Prosthesis 2021, 3(1), 61-74; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/prosthesis3010007 - 03 Feb 2021
Viewed by 464
Abstract
Denture-induced stomatitis (DIS) represents a pathological condition caused by ill-fitting dentures trauma, manifested as inflammation of the palatal tissue beneath the denture. The fungal infections are the principal contributory factors to DIS. Although the aetiology of DIS is multifactorial, the Candida albicans fungal [...] Read more.
Denture-induced stomatitis (DIS) represents a pathological condition caused by ill-fitting dentures trauma, manifested as inflammation of the palatal tissue beneath the denture. The fungal infections are the principal contributory factors to DIS. Although the aetiology of DIS is multifactorial, the Candida albicans fungal infection remains the main cause. The objective of the present systematic review was to evaluate the latest literature on the addition of nystatin into the tissue conditioners (TCs) in the management of DIS. To search the published literature about “the addition of nystatin in TCs for treating DIS”, electronic databases (PubMed (National library of medicine) and Cochrane Library (Wiley)) were searched (from 1975 until December 2020) using different keywords. Various studies described the effectiveness and efficacy of incorporating nystatin into several TCs. The present systematic review reported that the addition of nystatin is beneficial, with slight or no consequences on both the mechanical and physical features of TCs. Adding nystatin to various TCs for treating DIS can be suggested. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Tissue and Immunological Features of the Human/Prosthesis Interface)
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Preliminary Results of Total Hip Arthroplasty in Subjects at Risk for Dislocation Using a Novel Modular Cementless Dual-Mobility Cup. A Single-Center Prospective Study
Prosthesis 2021, 3(1), 53-60; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/prosthesis3010006 - 01 Feb 2021
Viewed by 377
Abstract
Nowadays total hip arthroplasty (THA) is widely considered the operation of the century in orthopedic and traumatological fields. Despite this fact, instability and dislocation after THA are a common reason for revision surgery. The purpose of this prospective study is to evaluate the [...] Read more.
Nowadays total hip arthroplasty (THA) is widely considered the operation of the century in orthopedic and traumatological fields. Despite this fact, instability and dislocation after THA are a common reason for revision surgery. The purpose of this prospective study is to evaluate the preliminary clinical and radiological results of a novel dual mobility cup. We evaluated 32 consecutive cases of patients who underwent THA using a novel dual mobility cup—with holes in the cup, a modular metallic inlay and a crosslinked polyethylene. All of them were considered at risk of instability of the implant due to primary or concomitant diagnosis. The preoperative Harris hip score was 54.7 on average. At a minimum 2 years follow-up, the mean HHS raised up to a mean value of 88.4; this improvement was statistically significant (p < 0.0001). None of the patients enrolled in this study sustained a postoperative dislocation at a mean follow-up of 39.6 months. Furthermore, no patients sustained modular liner dissociation or an intraprosthetic dislocation. As such, survivorship free from dislocation was 100% at both 2 and 5 years. This study demonstrates that the modular dual mobility (DM) socket provides dual articulation, larger jump distance, and greater range of motion before impingement, which significantly reduce the rate of dislocation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Section Orthopedics and Rehabilitation)
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Open AccessReview
Nanotechnology-Based Antimicrobial and Antiviral Surface Coating Strategies
Prosthesis 2021, 3(1), 25-52; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/prosthesis3010005 - 01 Feb 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 813
Abstract
Biocontamination of medical devices and implants is a growing issue that causes medical complications and increased expenses. In the fight against biocontamination, developing synthetic surfaces, which reduce the adhesion of microbes and provide biocidal activity or combinatory effects, has emerged as a major [...] Read more.
Biocontamination of medical devices and implants is a growing issue that causes medical complications and increased expenses. In the fight against biocontamination, developing synthetic surfaces, which reduce the adhesion of microbes and provide biocidal activity or combinatory effects, has emerged as a major global strategy. Advances in nanotechnology and biological sciences have made it possible to design smart surfaces for decreasing infections. Nevertheless, the clinical performance of these surfaces is highly depending on the choice of material. This review focuses on the antimicrobial surfaces with functional material coatings, such as cationic polymers, metal coatings and antifouling micro-/nanostructures. One of the highlights of the review is providing insights into the virus-inactivating surface development, which might particularly be useful for controlling the currently confronted pandemic coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). The nanotechnology-based strategies presented here might be beneficial to produce materials that reduce or prevent the transmission of airborne viral droplets, once applied to biomedical devices and protective equipment of medical workers. Overall, this review compiles existing studies in this broad field by focusing on the recent related developments, draws attention to the possible activity mechanisms, discusses the key challenges and provides future recommendations for developing new, efficient antimicrobial and antiviral surface coatings. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antiviral and Antimicrobial Surface Design Strategies)
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Open AccessEditorial
Acknowledgment to Reviewers of Prosthesis in 2020
Prosthesis 2021, 3(1), 24; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/prosthesis3010004 - 29 Jan 2021
Viewed by 283
Abstract
Peer review is the driving force of journal development, and reviewers are gatekeepers who ensure that Prosthesis maintains its standards for the high quality of its published papers [...] Full article
Open AccessPerspective
Can Prosthetic Hands Mimic a Healthy Human Hand?
Prosthesis 2021, 3(1), 11-23; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/prosthesis3010003 - 28 Jan 2021
Viewed by 571
Abstract
Historical evidence suggests that prostheses have been used since ancient Egyptian times. Prostheses were usually utilized for function and cosmetic appearances. Nowadays, with the advancement of technology, prostheses such as artificial hands can not only improve functional, but have psychological advantages as well [...] Read more.
Historical evidence suggests that prostheses have been used since ancient Egyptian times. Prostheses were usually utilized for function and cosmetic appearances. Nowadays, with the advancement of technology, prostheses such as artificial hands can not only improve functional, but have psychological advantages as well and, therefore, can significantly enhance an individual’s standard of living. Combined with advanced science, a prosthesis is not only a simple mechanical device, but also an aesthetic, engineering and medical marvel. Prosthetic limbs are the best tools to help amputees reintegrate into society. In this article, we discuss the background and advancement of prosthetic hands with their working principles and possible future implications. We also leave with an open question to the readers whether prosthetic hands could ever mimic and replace our biological hands. Full article
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Open AccessEditorial
Past, Present and Future of Prosthesis: 2020 Upgrade
Prosthesis 2021, 3(1), 9-10; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/prosthesis3010002 - 07 Jan 2021
Viewed by 388
Abstract
The scientific journal Prosthesis (ISSN 2673-1592) had its first issue published in 2019 thanks to the publisher, MDPI [...] Full article
Open AccessArticle
Lack of Support in Medical Device Regulation within Academia
Prosthesis 2021, 3(1), 1-8; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/prosthesis3010001 - 06 Jan 2021
Viewed by 534
Abstract
New medical technologies can transform healthcare, and automation of processes is becoming increasingly ubiquitous within the patient care sector. Many innovative ideas arise from academia, but regulations need to be taken into account if they want to reach the market and create a [...] Read more.
New medical technologies can transform healthcare, and automation of processes is becoming increasingly ubiquitous within the patient care sector. Many innovative ideas arise from academia, but regulations need to be taken into account if they want to reach the market and create a real impact. This is particularly relevant for applied fields, such as prosthetics, which continuously generates cutting-edge solutions. However, it remains unclear how well the regulatory pathway is supported within universities. This study applied a data-driven assessment of available online information regarding support of medical device regulations within universities. A total of 109,200 URLs were screened for regulatory information associated with universities in the UK and the USA. The results show that based on available online data, 55% of the selected universities in the UK and 35% in the USA did not provide any support for medical device regulations. There is a big discrepancy between universities in terms of the available support, as well as the kind of information that is made accessible by the academic institutes. It is suggested that increasing support for regulatory strategies during the early phases of research and development will likely yield a better translation of technologies into clinical care. Universities can play a more active role in this. Full article
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