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Welcome to This First Issue of the European Burn Journal
Article

Operating Room Fomites as Potential Sources for Microbial Transmission in Burns Theatres

1
Department of Plastic Surgery and Burns, Chelsea and Westminster Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London SW10 9NH, UK
2
Department of Plastic Surgery, University Hospitals Plymouth NHS Trust, Plymouth PL6 8DH, UK
3
Department of Surgery and Cancer, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ, UK
4
Department of Global Health and Infection, Brighton and Sussex Medical School, University of Sussex, Brighton BN1 9PX, UK
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North West London Pathology, London W6 8RF, UK
6
NIHR Health Protection Research Unit in Healthcare Associated Infections and Antimicrobial Resistance, Imperial College London, Hammersmith Campus, London W12 0NN, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 13 November 2020 / Revised: 6 December 2020 / Accepted: 22 December 2020 / Published: 6 January 2021
Background: Burn patients are susceptible to healthcare-associated infections. Contaminated surfaces play a role in microbial transmission. This study aimed to quantify the degree of contamination of burns theatre fomites during routine clinical use. Methods: The Patslide Patient Transfer Board (PAT slide) and operating table were investigated using two methods—bacterial swabs to culture viable organisms and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) swabs to measure biological material. Both items were sampled four times a day: before the first case, immediately after a case, immediately before the next case after cleaning and after the terminal clean. Results: Among 82 bacterial samples, four organisms were isolated, including Staphylococcus aureus, Enterobacter cloacae (E. cloacae) x2 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa), all from the PAT slide. The E. cloacae persisted after cleaning. In 9/82 swabs, the ATP count was >10 relative light units (RLU). In all cases where an organism was identified, the ATP count was >10 RLU. Hence the sensitivity and specificity of ATP > 10 RLU in detecting an organism were 100% and 94% respectively. Conclusions: Within burns theatres, there are instances of bacterial contamination on surfaces that persist despite cleaning. ATP luminometers as a point-of-care device may have a role in determining the cleanliness of surfaces, potentially minimizing onwards-bacterial transmission. View Full-Text
Keywords: burns surgery; infection control; environmental contamination; healthcare-associated infections burns surgery; infection control; environmental contamination; healthcare-associated infections
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MDPI and ACS Style

Rela, M.; Opel, S.; Williams, S.; Collins, D.P.; Martin, K.; Mughal, N.; Moore, L.S.P. Operating Room Fomites as Potential Sources for Microbial Transmission in Burns Theatres. Eur. Burn J. 2021, 2, 1-8. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ebj2010001

AMA Style

Rela M, Opel S, Williams S, Collins DP, Martin K, Mughal N, Moore LSP. Operating Room Fomites as Potential Sources for Microbial Transmission in Burns Theatres. European Burn Journal. 2021; 2(1):1-8. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ebj2010001

Chicago/Turabian Style

Rela, Mariam, Sophia Opel, Sarah Williams, Declan P. Collins, Kevin Martin, Nabeela Mughal, and Luke S.P. Moore 2021. "Operating Room Fomites as Potential Sources for Microbial Transmission in Burns Theatres" European Burn Journal 2, no. 1: 1-8. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ebj2010001

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