Obesities, Volume 1, Issue 1 (March 2021) – 2 articles

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Open AccessEditorial
Obesities: A New Peer-Reviewed Open-Access Interdisciplinary Journal Fostering Research on Multifactorial Obesity and Associated Cardiometabolic Disorders
Obesities 2021, 1(1), 26-28; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/obesities1010002 - 04 Jan 2021
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Abstract
Obesity prevalence has increased continuously over the past 50 years, a dramatic worldwide expansion not only limited to industrialized countries but also observed in a large number of low- and middle-income countries experiencing rapid rural–urban transition [...] Full article
Open AccessArticle
Transitions among BMI States: A Test of Competing Hypotheses
Obesities 2021, 1(1), 1-25; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/obesities1010001 - 08 Dec 2020
Viewed by 473
Abstract
Overweight/obesity and underweight among older adults remain major public health concerns in the United States. This study aims to assess cohort differences in transition among BMI (body mass index) statuses (underweight, normal weight, overweight, and obese) by various cohort and race/ethnicity–gender groups. The [...] Read more.
Overweight/obesity and underweight among older adults remain major public health concerns in the United States. This study aims to assess cohort differences in transition among BMI (body mass index) statuses (underweight, normal weight, overweight, and obese) by various cohort and race/ethnicity–gender groups. The empirical work of this study was based on the 1992–2014 Health and Retirement Study (HRS). Multistate life tables (MSLT) were used to assess transitions among different BMI statuses. Results from multistate life tables suggested that the impact of cumulative advantage (disadvantage), persistent inequality, and aging-as-leveler on transition among BMI statuses was shaped along race/ethnicity–gender and cohort lines. Weight management and weight loss strategies should focus on ethnic minorities (i.e., Black and Hispanic populations) and White participants from recent cohorts. Programs aimed at minimizing the negative consequences associated with underweight and weight loss should focus on individuals from earlier cohorts and Black populations. Full article
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