Previous Issue
Volume 1, September

Women, Volume 1, Issue 4 (December 2021) – 4 articles

  • Issues are regarded as officially published after their release is announced to the table of contents alert mailing list.
  • You may sign up for e-mail alerts to receive table of contents of newly released issues.
  • PDF is the official format for papers published in both, html and pdf forms. To view the papers in pdf format, click on the "PDF Full-text" link, and use the free Adobe Readerexternal link to open them.
Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:
Article
Are There Gender Differences in Social Cognition in First-Episode Psychosis?
by , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , and
Women 2021, 1(4), 204-211; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/women1040018 (registering DOI) - 20 Oct 2021
Abstract
The aim of this study was to explore gender differences in social cognition in a sample of first-episode psychosis (FEP). An observational descriptive study was performed with 191 individuals with FEP. Emotion perception was assessed using the Faces Test, theory of mind was [...] Read more.
The aim of this study was to explore gender differences in social cognition in a sample of first-episode psychosis (FEP). An observational descriptive study was performed with 191 individuals with FEP. Emotion perception was assessed using the Faces Test, theory of mind was assessed using the Hinting Task, and attributional style was assessed using the Internal, Personal and Situational Attributions Questionnaire. No gender differences were found in any of the social cognitive domains. Our results suggest that men and women with FEP achieve similar performances in social cognition. Therefore, targeting specific needs in social cognition regarding gender may not be required in early interventions for psychosis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers in Women 2021)
Article
The Association between Intimate Partner Violence, Depression and Influenza-Like Illness Experienced by Pregnant Women in Australia
by , , , , , , , , , , and
Women 2021, 1(4), 192-203; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/women1040017 - 20 Oct 2021
Abstract
Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) is a major public health issue, including during pregnancy where it poses a serious risk to the woman’s health. Influenza-Like Illness (ILI) also causes significant morbidity for women during pregnancy. It may be possible that ILI in pregnancy is [...] Read more.
Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) is a major public health issue, including during pregnancy where it poses a serious risk to the woman’s health. Influenza-Like Illness (ILI) also causes significant morbidity for women during pregnancy. It may be possible that ILI in pregnancy is associated with IPV, and that depression and trauma history play a role in the connection. 524 Australia-born women and 578 refugee-background women. Baseline participants were randomly recruited and interviewed from antenatal clinics between January 2015 and March 2016, and they were reinterviewed six months post-partum. Bivariate and path analysis were used to assess links between IPV, depression and ILI. One in 10 women (10%; 111 out of 1102) reported ILI during their pregnancy period and this rate was significantly (p < 0.001) higher for women born in conflict-affected countries (13%; 76 out of 578) as compared to Australian-born women (7%; 35 out of 524). In both groups, Time 1 traumatic events, IPV and depression symptoms were significantly associated with ILI at Time 2. A significant association between IPV at Time 1 and ILI at Time 2 was fully mediated by depression symptoms at Time 1 (Beta = 0.36 p < 0.001). A significant direct path was shown from depression symptoms to ILI (Beta = 0.26, p < 0.001). Regardless of migration history, pregnant women who have experienced IPV and depression are more likely to report influenza-like symptoms in pregnancy. This may suggest that trauma and depression negatively affect immunity, although it could also indicate a connection between depressive symptoms and physical experiences of ILI. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Characteristics of Pregnant Women and New Mothers Identified as Being At-Risk for Child Maltreatment in Early Pregnancy
Women 2021, 1(4), 181-191; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/women1040016 - 10 Oct 2021
Viewed by 276
Abstract
Pregnant women and new mothers who have risk factors of child maltreatment are “at high risk for future child maltreatment.” Early detection of them is crucial to prevent it. This community-based, retrospective, cross-sectional, observational study aimed to identify the characteristics of pregnant women, [...] Read more.
Pregnant women and new mothers who have risk factors of child maltreatment are “at high risk for future child maltreatment.” Early detection of them is crucial to prevent it. This community-based, retrospective, cross-sectional, observational study aimed to identify the characteristics of pregnant women, and those in their postpartum period, identified as at-risk cases for child maltreatment. We used data from the municipal pregnancy registration system in City A and analyzed 206 cases identified as “at-risk for child maltreatment” from 1 April 2017 to 31 March 2018. They were categorized into two groups: a pregnancy group (131 cases, 63.6%) and a postpartum group (75 cases, 36.4%). Logistic regression analysis revealed that women who reported having poor relationships with their parents and participated in the interview in their early stages of their pregnancy were less likely to be registered as at-risk cases for child maltreatment after delivery. The results suggest that public health nurses (PHNs) can conduct interviews with pregnant women during the early stages of pregnancy to prevent child maltreatment in community settings. Additionally, to ensure safe delivery and childrearing environments, PHNs need to assess the family support capacity of each registered case and provide assistance to those without parental support. Full article
Article
The Association between Disordered Eating Behavior and Body Image Biological Maturation and Levels of Adipocytokines in Preadolescent Girls: The Healthy Growth Study
Women 2021, 1(4), 169-180; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/women1040015 - 24 Sep 2021
Viewed by 286
Abstract
During puberty, rapid, complex hormonal, physical and cognitive changes occur that affect body image and eating behavior. The aim of this cross-sectional study, a secondary analysis of data from the Greek Healthy Growth Study, was to explore associations of disordered eating behaviors and [...] Read more.
During puberty, rapid, complex hormonal, physical and cognitive changes occur that affect body image and eating behavior. The aim of this cross-sectional study, a secondary analysis of data from the Greek Healthy Growth Study, was to explore associations of disordered eating behaviors and body image in 1206 10–12-year-old girls during pubertal maturation, with serum leptin and adiponectin levels, according to body mass index (BMI). Eating behavior and disordered eating were assessed with the Dutch Eating Behavior Questionnaire (DEBQ) and the Children Eating Attitudes Test Questionnaire (ChEAT), respectively. Associations of components of DEBQ and ChEAT with maturation according to Tanner Stage (TS) and levels of leptin and adiponectin were explored by univariate and multivariate regression analysis. Adiponectin levels in girls at TS 1 were positively associated with the “social pressure to eat” score of ChEAT. Leptin levels in girls at TS 4 were positively correlated with the “restraint eating” score of DEBQ, and the “dieting”, “body image” and “food awareness” scores of ChEAT. After adjustment for TS and BMI, only “body image” and leptin remained significant. Further research may shed light on how these hormonal changes affect eating behaviors at various pubertal stages, contributing to “TS-specific” preventive strategies for eating disorders in girls. Full article
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Previous Issue
Back to TopTop