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Article

Sociodemographic, Circumstantial, and Psychopathological Predictors of Involuntary Admission of Patients with Acute Psychosis

Department of Psychiatry, Social Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Hannover Medical School, 30625 Hannover, Germany
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Mosad Zineldin
Received: 8 June 2021 / Revised: 6 July 2021 / Accepted: 15 July 2021 / Published: 5 August 2021
Studies have consistently determined that patients with acute psychosis are more likely to be involuntarily admitted, although few studies examine specific risk factors of involuntary admission (IA) among this patient group. Data from all patients presenting in the psychiatric emergency department (PED) over a period of one year were extracted. Acute psychosis was identified using specific diagnostic criteria. Predictors of IA were determined using logistic regression analysis. Out of 2533 emergency consultations, 597 patients presented with symptoms of acute psychosis, of whom 118 were involuntarily admitted (19.8%). Involuntarily admitted patients were more likely to arrive via police escort (odds ratio (OR) 10.94) or ambulance (OR 2.95), live in a psychiatric residency/nursing home (OR 2.76), report non-adherence to medication (OR 2.39), and were less likely to suffer from (comorbid) substance abuse (OR 0.53). Use of mechanical restraint was significantly associated with IA (OR 13.31). Among psychopathological aspects, aggressiveness was related to the highest risk of IA (OR 6.18), followed by suicidal intent (OR 5.54), disorientation (OR 4.66), tangential thinking (OR 3.95), and suspiciousness (OR 2.80). Patients stating fears were less likely to be involuntarily admitted (OR 0.25). By understanding the surrounding influencing factors, patient care can be improved with the aim of reducing the use of coercion. View Full-Text
Keywords: coercion; psychiatry; psychopathology; emergency care; legal status coercion; psychiatry; psychopathology; emergency care; legal status
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MDPI and ACS Style

Seifert, J.; Ihlefeld, C.; Zindler, T.; Eberlein, C.K.; Deest, M.; Bleich, S.; Toto, S.; Meissner, C. Sociodemographic, Circumstantial, and Psychopathological Predictors of Involuntary Admission of Patients with Acute Psychosis. Psychiatry Int. 2021, 2, 310-324. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/psychiatryint2030024

AMA Style

Seifert J, Ihlefeld C, Zindler T, Eberlein CK, Deest M, Bleich S, Toto S, Meissner C. Sociodemographic, Circumstantial, and Psychopathological Predictors of Involuntary Admission of Patients with Acute Psychosis. Psychiatry International. 2021; 2(3):310-324. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/psychiatryint2030024

Chicago/Turabian Style

Seifert, Johanna, Christian Ihlefeld, Tristan Zindler, Christian K. Eberlein, Maximilian Deest, Stefan Bleich, Sermin Toto, and Catharina Meissner. 2021. "Sociodemographic, Circumstantial, and Psychopathological Predictors of Involuntary Admission of Patients with Acute Psychosis" Psychiatry International 2, no. 3: 310-324. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/psychiatryint2030024

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