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Tour. Hosp., Volume 1, Issue 1 (December 2020) – 4 articles

Cover Story (view full-size image): Agritourism (offering recreation and education on working farms) delivers a mosaic of benefits to farmers, visitors, and society. However, venturing into entrepreneurship requires farmers attaining expertise (e.g., service experience) and resources (e.g., joint insurance policies) conducive to success. Associations facilitate farmers accessing such expertise and resources by providing a social network beyond agriculture (e.g., marketing professionals). However, the membership of agritourism associations is declining, which might hinder their ability to support agritourism providers, especially emerging ones. ‘Demystifying Members’ Social Capital and Networks within an Agritourism Association’ investigates the role that associations have in building social capital and supporting the member-to-member information flow of topics related to agritourism, direct marketing, and overall business [...] Read more.
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Open AccessArticle
Demystifying Members’ Social Capital and Networks within an Agritourism Association: A Social Network Analysis
Tour. Hosp. 2020, 1(1), 41-58; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/tourhosp1010004 - 14 Dec 2020
Viewed by 499
Abstract
Membership associations are vital to build social capital and networks among their members through the exchange of information and resources, roles especially valuable for emerging entrepreneurs. That is the case of associations catering to professionals in agritourism, an enterprise bringing farming and tourism [...] Read more.
Membership associations are vital to build social capital and networks among their members through the exchange of information and resources, roles especially valuable for emerging entrepreneurs. That is the case of associations catering to professionals in agritourism, an enterprise bringing farming and tourism together. However, whether the exchange of information and resources among members holds true within agritourism associations is yet to be known. Filling this knowledge gap is critical given the stated benefits agritourism delivers to society and farmers’ necessity to expand their business networks to increase entrepreneurial success. Therefore, this study evaluated the extent of social capital and networks within a prominent agritourism-focused association in North America. Data were collected from members using a web-based survey in 2016. Analyses included descriptive statistical tests and Social Network Analysis (SNA). Results showed high levels of social capital among members, especially related to its relational dimension (e.g., share professional advice), as well as strong bi-directional (to/from) trust, cooperation, and reciprocity among members. SNA indicated members were well connected and had a healthy information exchange, without the organization intervention. Study results are discussed to provide managerial intelligence towards strengthening social capital and networks within associations catering to agritourism and other niche-tourism professionals. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
A Review of Quantitative Studies in Agritourism: The Implications for Developing Countries
Tour. Hosp. 2020, 1(1), 23-40; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/tourhosp1010003 - 30 Oct 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 986
Abstract
This study reviews the published quantitative literature in agritourism from the supply, demand, and both supply- and demand-side perspectives to determine the implications for agritourism in developing countries. A total of 85 quantitative papers were reviewed. Most studies in the literature concern developed [...] Read more.
This study reviews the published quantitative literature in agritourism from the supply, demand, and both supply- and demand-side perspectives to determine the implications for agritourism in developing countries. A total of 85 quantitative papers were reviewed. Most studies in the literature concern developed countries, and the motivations and attributes of the actors in this field have been investigated thoroughly, whereas few researchers have focused on quality tourism and identity in agritourism. This study suggests that policymakers in developing countries should promote females, insist on maintaining the quality of the workforce, ensure the availability of credit or subsidies to farmers, and guide and monitor the planning and development of agritourism. Furthermore, connecting different stakeholders and minimising the adverse effects in society through innovation in agritourism may lead to sustainable agritourism. Full article
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Open AccessEditorial
Taking a Road Less Travelled: Welcome to Tourism and Hospitality
Tour. Hosp. 2020, 1(1), 20-22; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/tourhosp1010002 - 27 Sep 2020
Viewed by 1184
Abstract
It is my privilege to serve as founding editor of our new journal, Tourism and Hospitality, and my pleasure to welcome you to its pages [...] Full article
Open AccessArticle
Experiential Marketing of an Underground Tourist Attraction
Tour. Hosp. 2020, 1(1), 1-19; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/tourhosp1010001 - 09 Aug 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1099
Abstract
The theory of the ‘experience economy’ contends that consumers no longer achieve satisfaction from consuming products but from the experiences they receive while doing so. Producers should therefore actively manage the four experience ‘realms’ of their product offerings—entertainment, education, aesthetics and escapism—to provide [...] Read more.
The theory of the ‘experience economy’ contends that consumers no longer achieve satisfaction from consuming products but from the experiences they receive while doing so. Producers should therefore actively manage the four experience ‘realms’ of their product offerings—entertainment, education, aesthetics and escapism—to provide optimal experiences for their customers. In the case of tourist attractions, however, there is insufficient direct empirical evidence to substantiate this recommendation. This study therefore sets out to test the notion of the experience economy in the context of a tourist attraction—in this case, an underground visitor experience in Wales, UK—using partial least squares structural equation modelling. Alternative models are estimated based on three different mediating variables—arousal, memory and satisfaction—with revisit intention as the dependent variable. The analysis finds that none of the four experience realms are significant predictors of revisit intention in all three of the models, even though all three mediating variables are significant predictors of revisit intention. The results therefore suggest that optimal customer experiences do not necessarily need to be built equally upon all four experiences realms. Rather, a customised approach is required to optimise the customer experience for specific products consumed in particular contexts. Full article
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