Oral, Volume 1, Issue 1 (March 2021) – 5 articles

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Open AccessBrief Report
COVID-19 Stressors among Dental Academics at UWI—A Caribbean Perspective
Oral 2021, 1(1), 36-44; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/oral1010005 - 26 Feb 2021
Abstract
COVID-19 is a pandemic that has affected health care personnel worldwide. Dentists have a high risk of contracting COVID-19 given the face-to-face contact required in daily interactions with their patients. This study aimed to determine the stressors experienced by academic dentists due to [...] Read more.
COVID-19 is a pandemic that has affected health care personnel worldwide. Dentists have a high risk of contracting COVID-19 given the face-to-face contact required in daily interactions with their patients. This study aimed to determine the stressors experienced by academic dentists due to the COVID-19 situation in Trinidad and Jamaica. All academic staff at the University of the West Indies (UWI) dental schools (St. Augustine and Mona campuses) were invited to complete a self-reported questionnaire, which was conducted for one month from May to June 2020. Thirty-two dental academics responded and the response rate was 61.54%. More than a third (34.4%) were in the 25–35 age group, 71.9% were females. The most common speciality (20.7%) was restorative dentistry. Just over one-third (38.7%) had been in academia for 5–10 years. Most (40.6%) were apprehensive about infecting their family. When the locus of control was determined, just over half (53.1%) felt they were in control of protecting themselves while 34.4% felt that external factors controlled their lives. The findings suggest that academic staff at UWI dental schools (Trinidad and Jamaica) were stressed by the COVID-19 situation. The vast majority were worried about infecting their families. Full article
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Open AccessReview
Calcium Silicate Cements vs. Epoxy Resin Based Cements: Narrative Review
Oral 2021, 1(1), 23-35; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/oral1010004 - 08 Feb 2021
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Abstract
In recent years, calcium silicate cements have been introduced. The purpose of this study is to analyze the main differences between calcium silicate-based cements and epoxy resin-based cements, analyzing the scientific literature of the last year to highlight the main advantages for predictable [...] Read more.
In recent years, calcium silicate cements have been introduced. The purpose of this study is to analyze the main differences between calcium silicate-based cements and epoxy resin-based cements, analyzing the scientific literature of the last year to highlight the main advantages for predictable clinical use. Data collected from the included studies were used in order to analyze different features: chemical-physical properties, cytotoxicity and cell migration, inflammatory response, mineralizing and osteogenic activity, ion release and the filling efficiency of root canals. The calcium silicate cements analyzed in these studies showed good biological and mechanical properties compared to conventional resin-based cements, resulting in better biocompatibility and less cytotoxicity; long-term studies are needed, but these cements have ideal characteristics to allow efficient filling of root canals. Full article
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
A Comparative Statistical Analysis on the Incidence of Developmental, Inflammatory and Neoplastic Odontogenic Cysts—A Single Center Retrospective Analysis from Italy
Oral 2021, 1(1), 15-22; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/oral1010003 - 21 Jan 2021
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Abstract
The aim of this study was a comparative statistical analysis of three categories of maxillary odontogenic cysts, evaluating frequency in relation to localization (mandibular or maxillary region), age and gender of patients. The study was a retrospective cohort study conducted at the University [...] Read more.
The aim of this study was a comparative statistical analysis of three categories of maxillary odontogenic cysts, evaluating frequency in relation to localization (mandibular or maxillary region), age and gender of patients. The study was a retrospective cohort study conducted at the University Hospital of Messina. Three hundred and fifty-six maxillary odontogenic cysts were classified into 283 inflammatory, 43 developmental and 30 neoplastic cysts. Female patients are more affected by developmental odontogenic cysts, while male patients are more affected by inflammatory odontogenic cysts. Both the mandibular and maxillary regions were affected mainly by inflammatory odontogenic cysts; no significantly statistic relationship was found between lesions and age. A significant association between odontogenic cyst lesions and patient gender was found. No significant association between histological features of lesion and age of patient was observed, nor subtype of odontogenic disease and localization (mandibular or maxillary). Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Pattern and Causes of Oral and Maxillofacial Injuries Presented to a Tertiary Care Public Dental Hospital in Strictly Imposed COVID-19 Lockdown Scenario
Oral 2021, 1(1), 3-14; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/oral1010002 (registering DOI) - 24 Nov 2020
Viewed by 436
Abstract
The unprecedented COVID-19 pandemic has indelibly impacted routine healthcare provision across the globe. Nevertheless, management of traumatic injuries has remained a priority patient care service of oral and maxillofacial (OMF) practice. This study aimed to explore the pattern and mechanisms of OMF injuries [...] Read more.
The unprecedented COVID-19 pandemic has indelibly impacted routine healthcare provision across the globe. Nevertheless, management of traumatic injuries has remained a priority patient care service of oral and maxillofacial (OMF) practice. This study aimed to explore the pattern and mechanisms of OMF injuries presenting at a major public dental hospital during a COVID-19 lockdown period in Sri Lanka. An enhanced OMF injury surveillance system was established at the National Dental Hospital (Teaching) Sri Lanka (NDHTSL) on 1 March 2020. OMF injury surveillance data from 1 March 2020 to 31 May 2020 were collated from the “enhanced injury surveillance form”. This period overlapped with the strictly imposed island-wide COVID-19 community lockdown. Pre-COVID-19 period (November 2017 to January 2020) OMF injury data were compared with this period. OMF injuries were categorized as hard tissue, extra-oral or intra-oral soft tissue, upper and middle face fractures and mandibular fractures. Data were analyzed with descriptive statistics, Fisher’s exact and Chi-square tests of significance. A total of 361 OMF injuries were identified among 208 patients who were predominantly males (71.6%); mean age was 24.95 ± 2.76 years. Injuries to gingivae and oral mucosa (26.9%) were the leading type, followed by extra-oral soft tissues (22.1%), periodontal injuries (20.7%) and hard tissue injuries (20.2%). Upper face and mandibular fractures accounted for 2.9% and 1.9%, respectively. Most patients sustained their injuries due to falls at their homes and surrounds. This was significantly increased compared to the pre-COVID-19 period (p = 0.0001). The significant increase in OMF injuries associated with falls around the home during the COVID-19 lockdown scenario in Sri Lanka compared to the pre-COVID-19 period may need further investigation in order to understand the how these injuries may be prevented. Full article
Open AccessEditorial
More Than One Reason for Oral, a New Journal
Oral 2021, 1(1), 1-2; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/oral1010001 - 22 Sep 2020
Viewed by 801
Abstract
Beyond my obvious enthusiasm due to the nascent state that generally makes us see everything with optimism, as Editor in Chief of this new publishing experience, I start by asking myself a question: is another dental journal called Oral really necessary [...] Full article
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