Next Issue
Volume 1, September

Nanomanufacturing, Volume 1, Issue 1 (June 2021) – 5 articles

  • Issues are regarded as officially published after their release is announced to the table of contents alert mailing list.
  • You may sign up for e-mail alerts to receive table of contents of newly released issues.
  • PDF is the official format for papers published in both, html and pdf forms. To view the papers in pdf format, click on the "PDF Full-text" link, and use the free Adobe Readerexternal link to open them.
Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:
Article
Heated Assembly and Transfer of Van der Waals Heterostructures with Common Nail Polish
Nanomanufacturing 2021, 1(1), 49-56; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nanomanufacturing1010005 - 15 Jun 2021
Viewed by 793
Abstract
Recent advances in the manipulation and control of layered, two-dimensional materials has given way to the construction of heterostructures with new functionality and unprecedented electronic properties. In this study, we present a simple technique to assemble and transfer van der Waals heterostructures using [...] Read more.
Recent advances in the manipulation and control of layered, two-dimensional materials has given way to the construction of heterostructures with new functionality and unprecedented electronic properties. In this study, we present a simple technique to assemble and transfer van der Waals heterostructures using common nail polish. Commercially available nail polish acts as a resilient sticky polymer, allowing for the fabrication of complex multi-material stacks without noticeable fatigue. Directly comparing four commercially available brands of nail polish, we find that one stands out in terms of stability and stacking characteristics. Using this method, we fabricate two top-gated devices and report their electrical properties. Our technique reduces the complexity in assembling van der Waals heterostructures based on the proven van der Waals pick up method. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Two-Dimensional Nanograting Fabrication by Multistep Nanoimprint Lithography and Ion Beam Etching
Nanomanufacturing 2021, 1(1), 39-48; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nanomanufacturing1010004 - 19 May 2021
Viewed by 438
Abstract
The application of nanopatterned electrode materials is a promising method to improve the performance of thin-film optoelectronic devices such as organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) and organic photovoltaics. Light coupling to active layers is enhanced by employing nanopatterns specifically tailored to the device structure. [...] Read more.
The application of nanopatterned electrode materials is a promising method to improve the performance of thin-film optoelectronic devices such as organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) and organic photovoltaics. Light coupling to active layers is enhanced by employing nanopatterns specifically tailored to the device structure. A range of different nanopatterns is typically evaluated during the development process. Fabrication of each of these nanopatterns using electron-beam lithography is time- and cost-intensive, particularly for larger-scale devices, due to the serial nature of electron beam writing. Here, we present a method to generate nanopatterns of varying depth with different nanostructure designs from a single one-dimensional grating template structure with fixed grating depth. We employ multiple subsequent steps of UV nanoimprint lithography, curing, and ion beam etching to fabricate greyscale two-dimensional nanopatterns. In this work, we present variable greyscale nanopatterning of the widely used electrode material indium tin oxide. We demonstrate the fabrication of periodic pillar-like nanostructures with different period lengths and heights in the two grating directions. The patterned films can be used either for immediate device fabrication or pattern reproduction by conventional nanoimprint lithography. Pattern reproduction is particularly interesting for the large-scale, cost-efficient fabrication of flexible optoelectronic devices. Full article
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Article
A New Nanomaterial Based Biosensor for MUC1 Biomarker Detection in Early Diagnosis, Tumor Progression and Treatment of Cancer
Nanomanufacturing 2021, 1(1), 14-38; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nanomanufacturing1010003 - 13 May 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 479
Abstract
Early detection of cancer disease is vital to the successful treatment, follow-up and survival of patients, therefore sensitive and specific methods are still required. Mucin 1 (MUC1) is a clinically approved biomarker for determining the cancer that is a type I transmembrane protein [...] Read more.
Early detection of cancer disease is vital to the successful treatment, follow-up and survival of patients, therefore sensitive and specific methods are still required. Mucin 1 (MUC1) is a clinically approved biomarker for determining the cancer that is a type I transmembrane protein with a dense glycosylated extracellular domain extending from the cell surface to 200–500 nm. In this study, nanopolymers were designed with a lectin affinity-based recognition system for MUC1 detection as a bioactive layer on electrochemical biosensor electrode surfaces. They were synthesized using a mini emulsion polymerization method and derivatized with triethoxy-3-(2-imidazolin-1-yl) propylsilane (IMEO) and functionalized with Concanavalin a Type IV (Con A) lectin. Advanced characterization studies of nanopolymers were performed. The operating conditions of the sensor system have been optimized. Biosensor validation studies were performed. Real sample blood serum was analyzed and this new method compared with a commercially available medical diagnostic kit (Enzyme-Linked ImmunoSorbent Assay-ELISA). The new generation nanopolymeric material has been shown to be an affordable, sensitive, reliable and rapid device with 0.1–100 U/mL linear range and 20 min response time. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers for Nanomanufacturing)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
CdSe-ZnO Core–Shell Quantum Dots for Protein Detection: A Potential Sensing Platform
Nanomanufacturing 2021, 1(1), 3-13; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nanomanufacturing1010002 - 09 Apr 2021
Viewed by 400
Abstract
A highly sensitive biosensing platform comprised of CdSe-ZnO core–shell nanostructures for targeted applications in protein detection is demonstrated. This innovative technique uses a microwave-assisted thermal decomposition method to produce a rapid, less hazardous, and user-friendly procedure to synthesize a semiconductor core surrounded by [...] Read more.
A highly sensitive biosensing platform comprised of CdSe-ZnO core–shell nanostructures for targeted applications in protein detection is demonstrated. This innovative technique uses a microwave-assisted thermal decomposition method to produce a rapid, less hazardous, and user-friendly procedure to synthesize a semiconductor core surrounded by nanometer-thick metal oxide shells. The benefit of using a metal oxide shell includes mitigating the toxicity of the CdSe core, thus increasing its biocompatibility and minimizing its photochemical corrosion and oxidation. We present a simple one-pot microwave-assisted protocol for the formation of CdSe-ZnO core–shell quantum dots (QDs). These QDs optimize the recognition limit of bovine serum albumin (BSA) protein through a spectral signal at a considerably low concentration (2.5 × 10−6 M), thus demonstrating its potential to become a highly effective surface-plasmon-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS)-like sensing platform. We report a QD material that can mimic a strong SERS-like behavior due to charge transfer affecting the local electric field. Full article
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Editorial
Nanomanufacturing: There’s Still Plenty of Room at the Bottom
Nanomanufacturing 2021, 1(1), 1-2; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/nanomanufacturing1010001 - 23 Feb 2021
Viewed by 719
Abstract
In 1959, Prof. Richard Feynman gave his famous lecture “There’s plenty of room
at the bottom”, which is considered the birth of the nanotechnology and nanoscience fields of research [...] Full article
Next Issue
Back to TopTop