Stresses, Volume 1, Issue 1 (March 2021) – 2 articles

  • Issues are regarded as officially published after their release is announced to the table of contents alert mailing list.
  • You may sign up for e-mail alerts to receive table of contents of newly released issues.
  • PDF is the official format for papers published in both, html and pdf forms. To view the papers in pdf format, click on the "PDF Full-text" link, and use the free Adobe Readerexternal link to open them.
Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:
Open AccessArticle
Gender Differences in Zinc and Copper Excretion in Response to Co-Exposure to Low Environmental Concentrations of Cadmium and Lead
Stresses 2021, 1(1), 3-15; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/stresses1010002 - 30 Dec 2020
Viewed by 539
Abstract
Disruption of the homeostasis of zinc (Zn) and copper (Cu) has been associated with nephrotoxicity of cadmium (Cd). Herein, we report the results of a cross sectional analysis of urinary excretion of Zn, Cu, Cd and lead (Pb) in 392 Thais (mean age [...] Read more.
Disruption of the homeostasis of zinc (Zn) and copper (Cu) has been associated with nephrotoxicity of cadmium (Cd). Herein, we report the results of a cross sectional analysis of urinary excretion of Zn, Cu, Cd and lead (Pb) in 392 Thais (mean age 33.6) living in an area of low-level environmental exposure to Cd and Pb, reflected by the respective median Cd and Pb excretion rates of 0.44 and 1.75 μg/g creatinine. Evidence for dysregulation of Zn and Cu homeostasis has emerged together with gender differentiated responses. In men, excretion rates for Zn and Cu were increased concomitantly, and their urinary Zn-to-Cu ratios were maintained. In women, only Cu excretion rose, causing a reduction in urinary Zn-to-Cu ratios. Only in women, urinary Zn-to-Cu ratios were associated with worse kidney function, assessed by estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) (β = −7.76, p = 0.015). Only in men, a positive association was seen between eGFR and body iron stores, reflected by serum ferritin (β = 5.32, p = 0.030). Thus, co-exposure to Cd and Pb may disrupt the homeostasis of Zn and Cu more severely in women than men, while urinary Zn-to-Cu ratios and body iron stores can serve as predictors of an adverse effect of co-exposure to Cd and Pb. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Responses and Defense Mechanisms against Toxic Metals)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessEditorial
Welcome to Stresses: The Only Gold Open Access International Journal Treating Responses to All Stresses in All Biological Systems, with an Interdisciplinary Vision
Stresses 2021, 1(1), 1-2; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/stresses1010001 - 08 Dec 2020
Viewed by 465
Abstract
A warm welcome from the Founder and Editor-in-Chief of Stresses, Luigi Sanità di Toppi, Full Professor of Botany at the University of Pisa, Italy [...] Full article
Back to TopTop