Next Issue
Volume 1, December
Previous Issue
Volume 1, June

BioMedInformatics, Volume 1, Issue 2 (September 2021) – 2 articles

  • Issues are regarded as officially published after their release is announced to the table of contents alert mailing list.
  • You may sign up for e-mail alerts to receive table of contents of newly released issues.
  • PDF is the official format for papers published in both, html and pdf forms. To view the papers in pdf format, click on the "PDF Full-text" link, and use the free Adobe Readerexternal link to open them.
Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:
Review
Good Statistical Practices for Contemporary Meta-Analysis: Examples Based on a Systematic Review on COVID-19 in Pregnancy
BioMedInformatics 2021, 1(2), 64-76; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/biomedinformatics1020005 - 23 Jul 2021
Viewed by 457
Abstract
Systematic reviews and meta-analyses have been increasingly used to pool research findings from multiple studies in medical sciences. The reliability of the synthesized evidence depends highly on the methodological quality of a systematic review and meta-analysis. In recent years, several tools have been [...] Read more.
Systematic reviews and meta-analyses have been increasingly used to pool research findings from multiple studies in medical sciences. The reliability of the synthesized evidence depends highly on the methodological quality of a systematic review and meta-analysis. In recent years, several tools have been developed to guide the reporting and evidence appraisal of systematic reviews and meta-analyses, and much statistical effort has been paid to improve their methodological quality. Nevertheless, many contemporary meta-analyses continue to employ conventional statistical methods, which may be suboptimal compared with several alternative methods available in the evidence synthesis literature. Based on a recent systematic review on COVID-19 in pregnancy, this article provides an overview of select good practices for performing meta-analyses from statistical perspectives. Specifically, we suggest meta-analysts (1) providing sufficient information of included studies, (2) providing information for reproducibility of meta-analyses, (3) using appropriate terminologies, (4) double-checking presented results, (5) considering alternative estimators of between-study variance, (6) considering alternative confidence intervals, (7) reporting prediction intervals, (8) assessing small-study effects whenever possible, and (9) considering one-stage methods. We use worked examples to illustrate these good practices. Relevant statistical code is also provided. The conventional and alternative methods could produce noticeably different point and interval estimates in some meta-analyses and thus affect their conclusions. In such cases, researchers should interpret the results from conventional methods with great caution and consider using alternative methods. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Adjusted Sample Size Calculation for RNA-seq Data in the Presence of Confounding Covariates
BioMedInformatics 2021, 1(2), 47-63; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/biomedinformatics1020004 - 29 Jun 2021
Viewed by 448
Abstract
Sample size calculation for adequate power analysis is critical in optimizing RNA-seq experimental design. However, the complexity increases for directly estimating sample size when taking into consideration confounding covariates. Although a number of approaches for sample size calculation have been proposed for RNA-seq [...] Read more.
Sample size calculation for adequate power analysis is critical in optimizing RNA-seq experimental design. However, the complexity increases for directly estimating sample size when taking into consideration confounding covariates. Although a number of approaches for sample size calculation have been proposed for RNA-seq data, most ignore any potential heterogeneity. In this study, we implemented a simulation-based and confounder-adjusted method to provide sample size recommendations for RNA-seq differential expression analysis. The data was generated using Monte Carlo simulation, given an underlined distribution of confounding covariates and parameters for a negative binomial distribution. The relationship between the sample size with the power and parameters, such as dispersion, fold change and mean read counts, can be visualized. We demonstrate that the adjusted sample size for a desired power and type one error rate of α is usually larger when taking confounding covariates into account. More importantly, our simulation study reveals that sample size may be underestimated by existing methods if a confounding covariate exists in RNA-seq data. Consequently, this underestimate could affect the detection power for the differential expression analysis. Therefore, we introduce confounding covariates for sample size estimation for heterogeneous RNA-seq data. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Previous Issue
Next Issue
Back to TopTop