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SARS-CoV-2 Detection Rates from Surface Samples Do Not Implicate Public Surfaces as Relevant Sources for Transmission

1
Institute for Hygiene and Environmental Medicine, University Medicine Greifswald, 17475 Greifswald, Germany
2
Department of Molecular and Medical Virology, Ruhr University Bochum, 44801 Bochum, Germany
3
Department of Microbiology, New Jersey Medical School-Rutgers University, Newark, NJ 07103, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 4 April 2021 / Revised: 5 May 2021 / Accepted: 18 May 2021 / Published: 21 May 2021
(This article belongs to the Section Infectious Disease Epidemiology, Prevention and Control)
Contaminated surfaces have been discussed as a possible source of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2). Under experimental conditions, SARS-CoV-2 can remain infectious on surfaces for several days. However, the frequency of SARS-CoV-2 detection on surfaces in healthcare settings and the public is currently not known. A systematic literature review was performed. On surfaces around COVID-19 cases in healthcare settings (42 studies), the SARS-CoV-2 RNA detection rates mostly were between 0% and 27% (Ct values mostly > 30). Detection of infectious SARS-CoV-2 was only successful in one of seven studies in 9.2% of 76 samples. Most of the positive samples were obtained next to a patient with frequent sputum spitting during sampling. Eight studies were found with data from public surfaces and RNA detection rates between 0% and 22.1% (Ct values mostly > 30). Detection of infectious virus was not attempted. Similar results were found in samples from surfaces around confirmed COVID-19 cases in non-healthcare settings (7 studies) and from personal protective equipment (10 studies). Therefore, it seems plausible to assume that inanimate surfaces are not a relevant source for transmission of SARS-CoV-2. In public settings, the associated risks of regular surface disinfection probably outweigh the expectable health benefits. View Full-Text
Keywords: SARS-CoV-2; surface; contamination; RNA; infectious virus SARS-CoV-2; surface; contamination; RNA; infectious virus
MDPI and ACS Style

Kampf, G.; Pfaender, S.; Goldman, E.; Steinmann, E. SARS-CoV-2 Detection Rates from Surface Samples Do Not Implicate Public Surfaces as Relevant Sources for Transmission. Hygiene 2021, 1, 24-40. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/hygiene1010003

AMA Style

Kampf G, Pfaender S, Goldman E, Steinmann E. SARS-CoV-2 Detection Rates from Surface Samples Do Not Implicate Public Surfaces as Relevant Sources for Transmission. Hygiene. 2021; 1(1):24-40. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/hygiene1010003

Chicago/Turabian Style

Kampf, Günter, Stephanie Pfaender, Emanuel Goldman, and Eike Steinmann. 2021. "SARS-CoV-2 Detection Rates from Surface Samples Do Not Implicate Public Surfaces as Relevant Sources for Transmission" Hygiene 1, no. 1: 24-40. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/hygiene1010003

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