Aquac. J., Volume 1, Issue 1 (September 2021) – 2 articles

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Article
Are Shell Strength Phenotypic Traits in Mussels Associated with Species Alone?
Aquac. J. 2021, 1(1), 3-13; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/aquacj1010002 - 23 Jul 2021
Viewed by 308
Abstract
Mussels often hybridise to form the Mytilus species complex comprised of M. edulis and M. galloprovincialis as the main species cultivated in Europe and, where their geographical distribution overlaps, the species M. trossulus. It has been suggested that M. trossulus have a [...] Read more.
Mussels often hybridise to form the Mytilus species complex comprised of M. edulis and M. galloprovincialis as the main species cultivated in Europe and, where their geographical distribution overlaps, the species M. trossulus. It has been suggested that M. trossulus have a weaker shell than the UK native M. edulis and hybridisation reduces farmed mussel yields and overall fitness. Here, we investigate the hypothesised link between species and shell weakness, employing multi-locus genotyping combined with measurements of six different phenotypes indicative of shell strength (shell thickness, flexural strength, Young’s modulus, Vicker’s hardness, fracture toughness, calcite and aragonite crystallographic orientation). Historic evidence from shell strength studies assumed species designation based on geographical origin, single locus DNA marker or allozyme genetic techniques that are limited in their ability to discern hybrid individuals. Single nucleotide polymorphic markers have now been developed with the ability to better distinguish between the species of the complex and their hybrids. Our study indicates that shell strength phenotypic traits are less associated with species than previously thought. The application of techniques outlined in this study challenges the historic influence of M. trossulus hybridisation on mussel yields and opens up potential for the environment to determine mussel shell fitness. Full article
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Editorial
Aquaculture Journal: A New Open Access Journal
Aquac. J. 2021, 1(1), 1-2; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/aquacj1010001 - 19 May 2021
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Abstract
Fishery production, considering both capture and aquaculture, is a major animal protein source for humans [...] Full article
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