Special Issue "New Traits of Agriculture/Food Quality Interface"

A special issue of Agriculture (ISSN 2077-0472). This special issue belongs to the section "Agricultural Product Quality and Safety".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (10 July 2021).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Alessandra Durazzo
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
CREA-Research Centre for Food and Nutrition, Via Ardeatina 546, 00178 Rome, Italy
Interests: natural products; bioactive compounds; antioxidants; food quality; nutrition; food composition databases; dietary supplements; herbs; botanicals; natural substances databases; synthesis; bioavailability, metabolic pathways
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

There is a close linkage between food and territory. The current challenges can be located in precision agriculture and food metrology from the perspective of monitoring and improving food quality, addressing the promotion of diversity of agroecosystems and diets. Research studies describing factors affecting food quality—such as agronomic conditions, post-harvest elicitors, cultivar selection, harvest date, or environmental influences—are welcome. Sustainable environmental and innovative practices should be promoted.

Advanced techniques, such as mass spectrometry, infrared, and Raman spectroscopy in the monitoring and control of foodstuffs for modeling the agrofood system should be considered. Innovative green technologies should be taken into account. Targeting food approaches should be promoted. Chemometrics applications are welcome.

This issue promotes highly interdisciplinary studies including disciplines from agriculture and biology, chemistry, and nutrition. All types of articles, such as original research, opinions, and reviews, are welcome.

Dr. Alessandra Durazzo
Guest Editor

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Keywords

  • Agronomic practices
  • Precision agriculture
  • Food metrology
  • Food monitoring
  • Chemometrics
  • Quality control
  • Advanced techniques

Published Papers (14 papers)

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Editorial

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Editorial
New Traits of Agriculture/Food Quality Interface
Agriculture 2021, 11(12), 1182; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/agriculture11121182 - 23 Nov 2021
Viewed by 215
Abstract
There is a close link between food and territory [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Traits of Agriculture/Food Quality Interface)

Research

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Article
Microbiome Analysis of the Rhizosphere from Wilt Infected Pomegranate Reveals Complex Adaptations in Fusarium—A Preliminary Study
Agriculture 2021, 11(9), 831; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/agriculture11090831 - 30 Aug 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 649
Abstract
Wilt disease affecting pomegranate crops results in rapid soil-nutrient depletion, reduced or complete loss in yield, and crop destruction. There are limited studies on the phytopathogen Fusarium oxysporum prevalence and associated genomic information with respect to Fusarium wilt in pomegranate. In this study, [...] Read more.
Wilt disease affecting pomegranate crops results in rapid soil-nutrient depletion, reduced or complete loss in yield, and crop destruction. There are limited studies on the phytopathogen Fusarium oxysporum prevalence and associated genomic information with respect to Fusarium wilt in pomegranate. In this study, soil samples from the rhizosphere of different pomegranate plants showing early stage symptoms of wilt infection to an advanced stage were collected from an orchard situated in Karnataka, India. A whole metagenome sequencing approach was employed to gain insights into the adaptations of the causative pathogen F. oxysporum. Physicochemical results showed a drop in the pH levels, N, Fe, and Mn, and increase in electrical conductivity, B, Zn, Cl, Cu was observed in the early and intermediate stage samples. Comparative abundance analysis of the experimental samples ESI and ISI revealed an abundance of Proteobacteria phyla Achromobacter sp. 2789STDY5608625, Achromobacter sp. K91, and Achromobacter aegrifaciens and Eukaryota namely Aspergillus arachidicola, Aspergillus candidus, and Aspergillus campestris. Functional pathway predictions implied carbohydrate binding to be significant (p < 0.05) among the three experimental samples. Microbiological examination and whole microbiome analysis confirmed the prevalence of F. oxysporum in the soil samples. Variant analysis of F. oxysporum revealed multiple mutations in the 3IPD gene with high impact effects. 3-Isopropylmalate dehydratase and carbohydrate-active enzymes could be good targets for the development of antifungals that could aid in biocontrol of F. oxysporum. The present study demonstrates the capabilities of the whole metagenome sequencing approach for rapid identification of potential key players of wilt disease pathogenesis wherein the symptomatology is complex. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Traits of Agriculture/Food Quality Interface)
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Article
Milling and Baking Quality of Spring Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) from Organic Farming
Agriculture 2021, 11(8), 765; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/agriculture11080765 - 11 Aug 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 608
Abstract
The quality of grain products from organic agriculture is an important subject of research for food safety and consumer health. The aim of the study was to examine the grain of spring wheat from organic agriculture according to their infestation by Fusarium spp., [...] Read more.
The quality of grain products from organic agriculture is an important subject of research for food safety and consumer health. The aim of the study was to examine the grain of spring wheat from organic agriculture according to their infestation by Fusarium spp., mycotoxin content, and technological value for milling and baking processing. The material was grain of 13 spring wheat varieties cultivated in organic systems in 3 years. The results showed that the intensity of Fusarium head blight (FHB) was low and ranged from 0.0% to 5.5% of ears. Grain infestation by Fusarium spp. varied between varieties and years from 1.5% to 18.5%. The colonization of grains by Fusarium spp. did not reflect the intensity of FHB. The lowest grain infestation by Fusarium spp. was noted for the varieties: Waluta, Zadra, and Arabella. Mycotoxin contamination of the grain of tested varieties did not exceed accepted standards. The requirements of the milling and baking industries were generally met by grain and flour of all the tested varieties. On the basis of the 3 year study results related to food safety and processing properties, the varieties most useful for organic production are Arabella, followed by Brawura, Izera, Kandela, Katoda, KWS Torridon, Waluta, and Zadra. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Traits of Agriculture/Food Quality Interface)
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Article
Relationships Linking the Colour and Elemental Concentrations of Blossom Honeys with Their Antioxidant Activity: A Chemometric Approach
Agriculture 2021, 11(8), 702; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/agriculture11080702 - 26 Jul 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 458
Abstract
The antioxidant activity of honey depends on the botanical origin, which also determines their physicochemical properties. In this study, a multivariate analysis was used to confirm potential relationships between the antioxidant properties and colour parameters, as well as the content of seven elements [...] Read more.
The antioxidant activity of honey depends on the botanical origin, which also determines their physicochemical properties. In this study, a multivariate analysis was used to confirm potential relationships between the antioxidant properties and colour parameters, as well as the content of seven elements in five types of artisanal honey (rapeseed, buckwheat, linden, black locust, and multifloral). The type of honey was found to significantly influence most of its physicochemical properties, colour parameters, and the content of potassium, manganese and copper. Antioxidant parameters were shown to be significantly positively correlated with redness and concentrations of copper and manganese, but negatively correlated with the hue angle and lightness. The principal component analysis confirmed that the darkest buckwheat honey had the highest antioxidant activity in combination with its specific colour parameters and content of antioxidant minerals (manganese, copper and zinc). The level of these parameters can be potentially used for the identification of buckwheat honey. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Traits of Agriculture/Food Quality Interface)
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Article
Comparison of the Grain Quality and Starch Physicochemical Properties between Japonica Rice Cultivars with Different Contents of Amylose, as Affected by Nitrogen Fertilization
Agriculture 2021, 11(7), 616; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/agriculture11070616 - 30 Jun 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 628
Abstract
In order to determine the effects of nitrogen fertilizer on the grain quality and starch physicochemical properties of japonica rice cultivars with different contents of amylose, normal amylose content (NAC) and low amylose content (LAC) cultivars were grown in a field, with or [...] Read more.
In order to determine the effects of nitrogen fertilizer on the grain quality and starch physicochemical properties of japonica rice cultivars with different contents of amylose, normal amylose content (NAC) and low amylose content (LAC) cultivars were grown in a field, with or without nitrogen fertilizer (WN). The relationships between the amylose content, starch physicochemical properties and eating quality were also examined. Compared with WN, nitrogen fertilizer (NF) significantly increased the grain yield but markedly decreased the grain weight. In addition, the processing quality tended to improve, but the appearance quality and eating quality deteriorated under NF application. The grain yield was similar between NAC and LAC cultivars. However, the grain quality and starch physicochemical properties were significantly different between NAC and LAC cultivars. The palatability of the cooked rice was significantly higher in the LAC than in NAC cultivar, which was due to its lower amylose content, protein content, hardness, and retrogradation enthalpy and degree, and its higher stickiness, peak viscosity, breakdown, relative crystallinity and peak intensity. The amylose content and protein content were significantly negatively correlated with the palatability. The amylose content was significantly positively correlated with the final viscosity and setback, and was significantly negatively correlated with the relative crystallinity, peak intensity, gelatinization enthalpy and breakdown. Palatability was significantly positively correlated with peak viscosity, breakdown and peak intensity, and was significantly negatively correlated with the final viscosity, setback, and retrogradation enthalpy and degree. Therefore, the selection of a low amylose content japonica rice cultivar grown without nitrogen fertilizer can reduce the amylose and protein contents, as well as improving the pasting properties, starch retrogradation properties and eating quality of the cooked rice. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Traits of Agriculture/Food Quality Interface)
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Article
Bioactive Compounds of Tomato Fruit in Response to Salinity, Heat and Their Combination
Agriculture 2021, 11(6), 534; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/agriculture11060534 - 10 Jun 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 820
Abstract
In light of foreseen global climatic changes, we can expect crops to be subjected to several stresses that may occur at the same time, but information concerning the effect of long-term exposure to a combination of stresses on fruit yield and quality is [...] Read more.
In light of foreseen global climatic changes, we can expect crops to be subjected to several stresses that may occur at the same time, but information concerning the effect of long-term exposure to a combination of stresses on fruit yield and quality is scarce. This work looks at the effect of a long-term combination of salinity and high temperature stresses on tomato yield and fruit quality. Salinity decreased yield but had positive effects on fruit quality, increasing TSS, acidity, glucose, fructose and flavonols. High temperatures increased the vitamin C content but significantly decreased the concentration of some phenolic compounds (hydroxycinnamic acids and flavanones) and some carotenoids (phytoene, phytofluene and violaxanthin). An idiosyncrasy was observed in the effect of a combination of stresses on the content of homovanillic acid O-hexoside, lycopene and lutein, being different than the effect of salinity or high temperature when applied separately. The effect of a combination of stresses may differ from the effects of a single stress, underlining the importance of studying how stress interactions may affect the yield and quality of crops. The results show the viability of exploiting abiotic stresses and their combination to obtain tomatoes with increased levels of health-promoting compounds. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Traits of Agriculture/Food Quality Interface)
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Article
Reasonable Nitrogen Fertilizer Management Improves Rice Yield and Quality under a Rapeseed/Wheat–Rice Rotation System
Agriculture 2021, 11(6), 490; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/agriculture11060490 - 25 May 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 588
Abstract
To determine the influence of N fertilizer management on rice yield and rice quality under diversified rotations and establish a high-yield, high-quality, and environmentally friendly diversified planting technology, a rapeseed/wheat–rice rotation system for 2 successive years was implemented. In those rotation systems, a [...] Read more.
To determine the influence of N fertilizer management on rice yield and rice quality under diversified rotations and establish a high-yield, high-quality, and environmentally friendly diversified planting technology, a rapeseed/wheat–rice rotation system for 2 successive years was implemented. In those rotation systems, a conventional N rate (Nc; 180 kg/hm2 N in rape season, 150 kg/hm2 N in wheat season) and a reduced N rate (Nr; 150 kg/hm2 N in rape season, 120 kg/hm2 N in wheat season) were applied. Based on an application rate of 150 kg/hm2 N in the rice season, three N management models were applied, in which the application ratio of base:tiller:panicle fertilizer was 20%:20%:60% in treatment M1, 30%:30%:40% in treatment M2, and 40%:40%:20% in treatment M3. Zero N was used as the control (M0). The results showed that, under Nc and Nr in the rape season, M3 management produced an increase in rice yield. The average rice yields in 2018 and 2019 were 9.41 t/hm2 and 9.54 t/hm2, respectively. An increase in rice peak viscosity, hot viscosity, break disintegration, and chalkiness was achieved. Under Nc and Nr in the wheat season, the panicle fertilizer of 40%:40%:20% in rice season produced a higher rice yield. The average yield was 9.45 t/hm2 and 9.19 t/hm2, respectively, and an increase in rice peak viscosity, hot viscosity, and break disintegration was produced. Reduced N for rapeseed and the panicle fertilizer of 40%:40%:20% in rice season under a rapeseed–rice rotation system can be recommended to stabilize yield and ensure high-quality rice production and environmentally friendly rapeseed–rice rotation systems in southern China. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Traits of Agriculture/Food Quality Interface)
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Article
Effects of Camu-Camu (Myrciaria dubia) Powder on the Physicochemical and Kinetic Parameters of Deteriorating Microorganisms and Salmonella enterica Subsp. enterica Serovar Typhimurium in Refrigerated Vacuum-Packed Ground Beef
Agriculture 2021, 11(3), 252; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/agriculture11030252 - 17 Mar 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 691
Abstract
This study aims to evaluate the effects of camu-camu powder (CCP), Amazonian berry fruit with documented bioactive properties, physicochemical meat parameters, and the growth kinetics parameters of S. enterica ser. Typhimurium, psychrotrophic bacteria (PSY), and lactic acid bacteria (LAB) in vacuum-packed ground beef. [...] Read more.
This study aims to evaluate the effects of camu-camu powder (CCP), Amazonian berry fruit with documented bioactive properties, physicochemical meat parameters, and the growth kinetics parameters of S. enterica ser. Typhimurium, psychrotrophic bacteria (PSY), and lactic acid bacteria (LAB) in vacuum-packed ground beef. Batches of ground beef were mixed with 0.0%, 2.0%, 3.5%, and 5.0% CCP (w/w), vacuum-packed as 10 g portions, and stored at 5 °C for 16 days. Centesimal composition analyses (only on the initial day), pH, TBARS, and color were quantified on storage days 1, 7, and 15, while PSY and LAB were counted on days 0, 3, 6, 9, 13, and 16. Another experiment was conducted with the same camu-camu doses by inoculating S. enterica ser. Typhimurium microbial kinetic curves were modeled by the Huang growth and Weibull decay models. CCP decreased TBARS in beef from 0.477 to 0.189 mg MDA·kg−1. No significant differences in meat pH between treated and control samples were observed on day 15. CCP addition caused color changes, with color a* value decreases (from 14.45 to 13.44) and color b* value increases (from 17.41 to 21.25), while color L* was not affected. Higher CCP doses caused progressive LAB growth inhibition from 0.596 to 0.349 log CFU·day−1 at 2.0% and 5.0% CCP, respectively. Similarly, PSY growth rates in the treated group were lower (0.79–0.91 log CFU·day−1) compared to the control (1.21 log CFU·day−1). CCP addition at any of the investigated doses produced a steeper S. enterica ser. Typhimurium inactivation during the first cold storage day, represented by Weibull’s concavity α shape parameter, ranged from 0.37 to 0.51, in contrast to 1.24 for the control. At the end of the experiment, however, S. enterica ser. Typhimurium counts in beef containing CCP were not significantly different (p < 0.05) from the control. Although CCP affects bacterial kinetics, it does not protect ground beef against spoilage bacteria and Salmonella to the same degree it does against lipid peroxidation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Traits of Agriculture/Food Quality Interface)
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Article
Grain Quality of Maize Cultivars as a Function of Planting Dates, Irrigation and Nitrogen Stress: A Case Study from Semiarid Conditions of Iran
Agriculture 2021, 11(1), 11; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/agriculture11010011 - 27 Dec 2020
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 854
Abstract
Maize grain is an important source of human and animal feed, and its quality can be affected by management practices and climatic conditions. This study aimed to evaluate the concentration and composition of starch, protein and oil in grain of maize cultivars in [...] Read more.
Maize grain is an important source of human and animal feed, and its quality can be affected by management practices and climatic conditions. This study aimed to evaluate the concentration and composition of starch, protein and oil in grain of maize cultivars in response to different planting dates (20 June and 21 July), irrigation (12-day and 6-day intervals) and nitrogen rates (0 and 184 kg N ha−1). The first two principal components (PCs) accounted for 84.5% of the total variation. High N fertilization increased protein (by 6.0 and 10.9 g kg−1) and total nonessential amino acids (by 3.4 and 2.4 g kg−1) during 2018 and 2019, respectively. With the high irrigation rate, the high N rate increased oil, total unsaturated fatty acids, and starch and amylopectin, whereas with the low irrigation rate, there was no effect of the N rate. With earlier planting, total saturated fatty acids were higher. The findings highlight the complicated relationship between the different factors and how they affect quality characteristics of maize grain. There was a large impact of year, which to a great extent cannot be controlled, even in this environment where water supply was controlled and rainfall did not affect the results. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Traits of Agriculture/Food Quality Interface)
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Article
Phenolics and Antioxidant Activity of Green and Red Sweet Peppers from Organic and Conventional Agriculture: A Comparative Study
Agriculture 2020, 10(12), 652; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/agriculture10120652 - 21 Dec 2020
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 1086
Abstract
Today, consumers are very concerned regarding food quality, nutritional composition and positive health effects of consumed foods. In this context, the preference and consumption of organic products has been increasing worldwide. In the present work, sweet peppers in two maturation stages (i.e., green [...] Read more.
Today, consumers are very concerned regarding food quality, nutritional composition and positive health effects of consumed foods. In this context, the preference and consumption of organic products has been increasing worldwide. In the present work, sweet peppers in two maturation stages (i.e., green and red peppers) from organic and conventional production systems were evaluated in regards to phenolic composition and antioxidant activity. Nine phenolic compounds were identified and quantified by a high-performance liquid chromatography-diode-array detector (HPLC-DAD), namely resveratrol, meta-coumaric acid, ortho-coumaric acid, clorogenic acid, caffeic acid, myricetin, rutin, luteolin-7-O-glucoside and quercitin-3-O-rhamnoside. In contrast to the production system, the maturation stage showed a pronounced significant effect on the phenolic composition of the studied sweet peppers; in general, green peppers possessed higher contents than red ones. Meta-coumaric acid, ortho-coumaric acid and quercitin-3-O-rhamnoside were more abundant in green conventional peppers and chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid and rutin were found in higher levels in red organic peppers. Regarding the antioxidant activity, green conventional peppers showed the highest DPPH, ABTS•+ and total reducing capacities, while red conventional peppers had higher TEAC values. Finally, principal component analysis showed that the phenolic composition together with the antioxidant capacities could be used to differentiate the production system and the maturation stage of sweet peppers. This finding confirmed that both factors influenced the peppers’ phenolic composition and antioxidant capacity, allowing their possible use as maturation–production biomarkers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Traits of Agriculture/Food Quality Interface)
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Article
Phenolic Compounds Characterization and Antioxidant Properties of Monocultivar Olive Oils from Northeast Algeria
Agriculture 2020, 10(11), 494; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/agriculture10110494 - 23 Oct 2020
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 933
Abstract
In Algeria, the olive tree is one of the main fruit species and plays a very important socioeconomic role. The objective of this study was firstly, to identify and quantify the phenolics of some Algerian olive oils, and secondly, to assess the antioxidant [...] Read more.
In Algeria, the olive tree is one of the main fruit species and plays a very important socioeconomic role. The objective of this study was firstly, to identify and quantify the phenolics of some Algerian olive oils, and secondly, to assess the antioxidant activity of the samples. The olive oils used in this study were derived from Algerian cultivars, including Tefahi, Gelb Elfarroudj, Chemlal, and imported cultivar Manzanilla and Zebboudj. For this purpose, gas chromatography—mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was used to identify olive oil fatty acids profile, while the individual phenolic compounds were assessed by ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography–electrospray ionization–high-resolution mass spectrometry (UHPLC-HESI-MS). To verify the antioxidant capacity, five in vitro free radical assays were used. Questionable values of particular physico-chemical parameters, such as the high value of free acidity and the low concentration of monounsaturated fatty acids in oil from the Zebboudj cultivar, indicate that improvements in olive cultivation and oil production practices are needed. Gelb Elfarroudj, Tefahi, and Manzanilla oils contain quantities of monounsaturated fatty acids in accordance with EU regulations. The oil obtained from the Zebboudj cultivar is not usable for food purposes due to the high value in free acidity and the low concentration of monounsaturated fatty acids. Tefahi and Manzanilla cultivars have given oils with the best antioxidant activity as compared to other studied cultivars; this is attributable to their composition in bioactive phenolic compounds, such as secoiridoids, which play an important role in human health as scavengers of free radicals. The results are interesting for producers and consumers to promote the culture of olive oils derived in particular from the Tefahi cultivar. However, in order to improve the health qualities of this oil, the agronomic techniques essentially linked to the time of harvesting of the olives destined for oil production must be improved. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Traits of Agriculture/Food Quality Interface)
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Article
Spouted Bed Dried Rosmarinus officinalis Extract: A Novel Approach for Physicochemical Properties and Antioxidant Activity
Agriculture 2020, 10(8), 349; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/agriculture10080349 - 11 Aug 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 979
Abstract
In this study, a conical-cylindrical spouted bed dryer with Teflon® beads as spouting material was used for producing powdered rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis L.) extract. The influence of the inlet drying gas temperature (Tgi) and the percentage ratio between the [...] Read more.
In this study, a conical-cylindrical spouted bed dryer with Teflon® beads as spouting material was used for producing powdered rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis L.) extract. The influence of the inlet drying gas temperature (Tgi) and the percentage ratio between the feed rate of concentrated liquid extract by the maximum evaporation capacity of the spouted bed (Ws/Wmax) on selected physicochemical properties of the finished products were investigated. Antioxidant properties of the concentrated liquid extract and dried extracts were also evaluated by the 2.2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging (DPPH) and lipid peroxidation induced by Fe2+/citrate (LPO) methods; and compared with the values obtained for a lyophilized extract (used as a control). Colloidal silicon dioxide (Tixosil® 333) and maltodextrin (DE 14) at a 2:1 ratio was added to the concentrated extract before drying (4.4% w/w) to improve the drying performance. The drying variables Ws/Wmax and Tgi have statistically significant influence on total polyphenols and total flavonoid contents of the dried powders. The concentrated extract (on dry basis—being absolute solid content) showed superior antioxidant activity (AA) compared to both the spouted bed dried and the lyophilized extracts; exhibiting IC50 values of 0.96 ± 0.02, 2.16 ± 0.04 and 3.79 ± 0.05 µg mL−1 (DPPH method) and 0.22 ± 0.01, 1.31± 0.01 and 2.54 ± 0.02 µg mL−1 (LPO method), respectively. These results of AA are comparable to values obtained for quercetin, a flavonoid compound often used as a reference standard due to its potent antioxidant activity; with IC50 of 1.17 µg mL−1 (DPPH) and 0.22 µg mL−1 (LPO). However, the dried rosemary extracts are about 13.5 times more concentrated than the initial concentrated extract (dry weight), with a concentration of total flavonoids and polyphenols compounds ranging from 4.3 to 12.3 and from 1.2 to 4.7 times higher than the concentrated extract values (wet basis). The AA per dry product mass was thus significantly higher than the values measured for concentrated extractive solution, irrespective of some losses of AA apparently due to the drying process. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Traits of Agriculture/Food Quality Interface)
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Other

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Perspective
Antioxidant Properties of Bee Products Derived from Medicinal Plants as Beekeeping Sources
Agriculture 2021, 11(11), 1136; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/agriculture11111136 - 13 Nov 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 436
Abstract
Plant species are fundamental source of nectar in beekeeping since bees access nectar and pollen from flowers. Consequently, bee products are strongly linked to the bee foraging flora source, and, depending on this, they acquire defined features, including their health and medicinal properties. [...] Read more.
Plant species are fundamental source of nectar in beekeeping since bees access nectar and pollen from flowers. Consequently, bee products are strongly linked to the bee foraging flora source, and, depending on this, they acquire defined features, including their health and medicinal properties. Medicinal plants contribute greatly to increase the beneficial properties of bee products, such as honey, pollen, royal jelly, and propolis. Bee products represent a potential source of natural antioxidants that can counteract the effects of oxidative stress underlying the pathogenesis of many diseases. The antioxidant properties of bee products have been widely studied and there is an abundance of information available in the literature. Notwithstanding, the uniqueness of the presented perspective is to provide an updated overview of the antioxidant properties of bee products derived from medicinal plants as beekeeping sources. This topic is divided and discussed in the text in different sections as follows: (i) beekeeping and the impacts of environmental factors; (ii) an overview of the role of medicinal plants for bee products; (iii) definition and categorization of the main medicinal bee plants and related bee products; (iv) the study approach of the antioxidant properties; (v) the conventional and innovative assays used for the measurement of the antioxidant activity; and (vi) the antioxidant properties of bee products from medicinal plants. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Traits of Agriculture/Food Quality Interface)
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Perspective
Metrology, Agriculture and Food: Literature Quantitative Analysis
Agriculture 2021, 11(9), 889; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/agriculture11090889 - 16 Sep 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 605
Abstract
Great attention has been given in recent years to the relationships between metrology, agriculture, and food. This study aims at providing an analysis of the literature regarding the relationships between metrology, agriculture, and food. The Scopus online database has been used to extract [...] Read more.
Great attention has been given in recent years to the relationships between metrology, agriculture, and food. This study aims at providing an analysis of the literature regarding the relationships between metrology, agriculture, and food. The Scopus online database has been used to extract bibliometric data throughout the search string: TITLE-ABS-KEY (Metrology* AND Agriculture* OR Food*), and the VOSviewer bibliometric software was used to visualize results as bubble maps. The novelty character of this perspective paper is to indicate and point out the main research themes/lines addressing the relationships between metrology, agriculture, and food by analyzing: (i) the authors of the published papers; (ii) the type of paper; (iii) the countries and institutions where the research is developed. Bibliometrics allows one to holistically examine entire scientific areas or sub-fields to get new qualitative and quantitative insights. These results represent a useful tool for identifying emerging research directions, collaboration networks, and suggestions for more in-depth literature searches. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Traits of Agriculture/Food Quality Interface)
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