Special Issue "Protein Crops: Physiological and Functional Perspectives"

A special issue of Agriculture (ISSN 2077-0472). This special issue belongs to the section "Agricultural Product Quality and Safety".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Jose C. Jimenez-Lopez
E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
Department of Biochemistry, Cell and Molecular Biology of Plants, Estacion Experimental del Zaidin, Spanish National Research Council (CSIC), Granada, Spain
Interests: Seed biology; Seed development and germination; seed protein functionality; seed nutraceutic compunds; functional foods; food allergy; seed allergens; molecular tools for allergy diagnosis and therapy
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Alfonso Clemente
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Physiology and Biochemistry of the Animal Nutrition, Estacion Experimental del Zaidin, Spanish National Research Council (CSIC), Granada, Spain
Interests: legumes; sustainability; protein products; nutrition; bioeconomy; food safety
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Agriculture is facing a huge challenge worldwide to produce enough biomaterials for an increasing population, using limited resources under climate resilience. Protein crops must serve as alternative crops and become outstanding sources of protein to satisfy this future increasing demand of plant protein for food and feed, while meeting nutritional and health benefit requirements. Such crops include various oilseeds and grains, i.e., legumes, pseudocereals, and other crops.

This Research Topic will encompass different aspects of protein crops, such as the functional roles of seed and grain proteins for physiological crop responses to climate resilience; seed and grain physiological improvement; genetic studies and selection programs to explore high yield and/or specific seed quality traits; proteomic and metabolomic studies on protein crops for the identification of accurate biomarkers for breeding programs; integration of bioinformatics methodological approaches and “Big Data” projects in a smart agriculture; germplasm resources and natural biodiversity exploitation; sustainable cultivation and agriculture; high nutritional seed development; uses of seed/grains for food and feed; nutraceuticals’ properties and health benefits; and antinutritional aspects of protein crops.

These listed topics may be considered as crucial for this Special Issue, since they will provide a body of knowledge which will be useful in better understanding protein crops as future plant proteins.

Dr. Jose C. Jimenez-Lopez
Dr. Alfonso Clemente
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Agriculture is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

 

Keywords

  • Legumes
  • PULSES
  • Oilseeds and grains as pseudocereals
  • Seed and grain quality and yield
  • Functional proteins
  • Physiological and nutraceutical roles of functional proteins
  • Seed and grain role as functional foods and “superfoods”
 

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
Morphometric and Nutritional Characterization of the Main Spanish Lentil Cultivars
Agriculture 2021, 11(8), 741; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/agriculture11080741 - 04 Aug 2021
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Abstract
Nowadays, there is a growing demand for high-quality vegetal protein food products, such as pulses and lentils in particular. However, there is no scientific evidence on the nutritional and morphometric characterization of the main lentil cultivars in the Western Mediterranean area. For this [...] Read more.
Nowadays, there is a growing demand for high-quality vegetal protein food products, such as pulses and lentils in particular. However, there is no scientific evidence on the nutritional and morphometric characterization of the main lentil cultivars in the Western Mediterranean area. For this reason, the aim of this work is to carry out a morphometric and nutritional characterization of the main Spanish lentil cultivars. Nutrient content assessment was performed on dry matter. The results showed that all studied cultivars are large and heavy lentils, except for the cultivar “Pardina”. They have high protein levels, ranging from 21% to 25%, which is higher than those found in any other pulse, as well as a high carbohydrate content, greater than 59% in all cases. Fiber content was higher than expected in “Armuña” and “Rubia Castellana” cultivars, ranging from 6% to 6.6%, and exceptionally high in the case of the cultivar “Pardina”, which reached 7.8%. Conversely, very low values were found for fat content, varying between 0.5% and 0.9%. Ca, Fe and Mg levels were remarkably higher (from 550 ppm to 851 ppm, from 98 ppm to 139 ppm and from 790 ppm to 989 ppm, respectively) than those found for other lentil cultivars, especially the high Mg content in the cultivars “Jaspeada” and “Microjaspeada”, both above 955 ppm. Clear differentiation was found between the cultivars “Rubia Castellana”, “Pardina” and those included in the Protected Geographical Indication (PGI) “Lenteja de la Armuña”. Overall, lentil cultivars included in the PGI “Lenteja de la Armuña” showed better morphometric and nutritional characteristics than cultivars “Pardina” or “Rubia Castellana”. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Protein Crops: Physiological and Functional Perspectives)
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Article
Variation in Protein and Isoflavone Contents of Collected Domestic and Foreign Soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merrill) Germplasms in Korea
Agriculture 2021, 11(8), 735; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/agriculture11080735 - 02 Aug 2021
Viewed by 474
Abstract
This study was carried out to investigate the variations in protein and isoflavone contents of 300 soybean germplasms introduced from domestic and foreign countries and to compare their contents in terms of size, colour and country of origin. The protein content ranged from [...] Read more.
This study was carried out to investigate the variations in protein and isoflavone contents of 300 soybean germplasms introduced from domestic and foreign countries and to compare their contents in terms of size, colour and country of origin. The protein content ranged from 28.7 g 100 g1 to 44.5 g 100 g1, with an average of 39.0 g 100 g1. In a comparison of protein according to country of origin, the highest content was seen in soybeans from Korea (39.7 g 100 g1), followed by North Korea (39.2 g 100 g1), China (39.0 g 100 g1), Japan (38.8 g 100 g1), the USA (38.0 g 100 g1) and Russia (37.2 g 100 g1). The total isoflavone content ranged from 207.0 µg g−1 to 3561.8 µg g−1, with an average of 888.8 µg g−1. In the comparison of isoflavone content according to country, the highest average content was shown in soybeans from Japan (951.3 µg g−1), followed by the USA (918.7 µg g−1), Korea (902.2 µg g−1), North Korea (870.0 µg g−1) and Russia (710.6 µg g−1). Daidzein, glycitein and genistein isoflavone contents were positively correlated, while total isoflavone and protein showed a low negative correlation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Protein Crops: Physiological and Functional Perspectives)
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Article
Effect of Pod Sealant Application on the Quantitative and Qualitative Traits of Field Pea (Pisum sativum L.) Seed Yield
Agriculture 2021, 11(7), 645; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/agriculture11070645 - 09 Jul 2021
Viewed by 856
Abstract
Field pea is used for human consumption or as livestock feed. The yield of pea seeds can be significantly decreased due to the genetically determined tendency of peas to pod shattering. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of pod sealant application on [...] Read more.
Field pea is used for human consumption or as livestock feed. The yield of pea seeds can be significantly decreased due to the genetically determined tendency of peas to pod shattering. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of pod sealant application on the quantitative and qualitative traits of the seed yield of two pea cultivars: Arwena and Tarchalska grown in south-western Poland in the years 2018–2019. Pod sealant application showed higher values of analysed quantitative and qualitative traits: number of pods per plant, number of seeds per plant, seed weight per pod, 1000-seed weight, seed yield, dry matter of seeds, protein content in seeds, and total protein productivity, except the number of seeds per pod. For both years (2018–2019), the interaction of cultivar and pod sealant application showed a significant effect on the number of seeds per plant, total protein content, total protein productivity, and seed weight per pod in 2019. Therefore, the pod sealant application can be a relatively simple way to improve the yielding of field peas. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Protein Crops: Physiological and Functional Perspectives)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

 
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