Special Issue "Biotic and Abiotic Stresses in Crop Plants"

A special issue of Agriculture (ISSN 2077-0472). This special issue belongs to the section "Crop Production".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 December 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Kevin Begcy
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Environmental Horticulture Department, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA
Interests: plant reproduction; stress biology; epigenetics; bioinformatics; cereals
Dr. Laramy Enders
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Entomology, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907, USA
Interests: agricultural microbiomes; plant-insect interactions; vector biology; stress biology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The impact of environmental stresses on plant development and productivity has long been recognized as a major agricultural challenge. In order to cope with increasing demands for crop production, it is necessary to understand how plants respond to biotic and abiotic stresses. The impact of biotic and abiotic stress spans many levels, including declines in productivity, reproductive and developmental costs, as well as disruption of key physiological, cellular, biochemical, molecular and epigenetic procesess. Many molecular-level responses are critical to achieving stress resilience during plant development and are promising targets for improving crop protection and productivity during biotic and abiotic stress periods. In adddition, considerable recent research highlights the importance of soil microbial communities and plant-associated microbiota in mediating stress responses (e.g., pest and pathogen resistance, drought tolerance). Thus, the interesting functional potential of plant microbiota to improve stress resilience provides an additional opportunity to address current challenges in crop production.

This Special Issue on biotic and abiotic stresses, therefore, seeks contributions which present the latest advances in understanding how plants respond to biotic stresses, including damage from insect feeding, bacterial and fungal infections, as well as abiotic stresses such as extreme temperatures, salinity, water limitation, flooding and heavy metals. Research which draws upon knowledge of crop stress responses to better inform and develop management approaches that support agroecosysem health as well as stress biology research at a population or ecosystem level are strongly encouraged. We welcome original research manuscripts, method papers, reviews and systematic reviews. These include perspectives on how to develop strategies that can be utilized to accelerate plant breeding and biotechnology to improve stress resilience and crop production.

Dr. Kevin Begcy
Dr. Laramy Enders
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Agriculture is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

 

Keywords

  • Stress responses
  • Abiotic stresses
  • Biotic stresses
  • Microbiota
  • Crop plants
  • Model plants
  • Epigenetics
  • Plant–pathogen interaction
 

Published Papers (4 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Article
Durum Wheat Mediterranean Landraces: A Valuable Source for Resistance to Tan Spot Disease
Agriculture 2021, 11(11), 1148; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/agriculture11111148 - 16 Nov 2021
Viewed by 347
Abstract
Tan spot (TS), caused by Pyrenophora tritici-repentis (Ptr), has gained significant importance in Tunisia. In this study, a Mediterranean durum wheat collection of 113 accessions were evaluated under field conditions, during the 2018–2019 cropping season, for resistance to Ptr at Koudia [...] Read more.
Tan spot (TS), caused by Pyrenophora tritici-repentis (Ptr), has gained significant importance in Tunisia. In this study, a Mediterranean durum wheat collection of 113 accessions were evaluated under field conditions, during the 2018–2019 cropping season, for resistance to Ptr at Koudia experimental station in Bou Salem (Tunisia). The disease progress curve (AUDPC) was used to screen this collection, and the effect of days to heading (DH) and plant height (PH) were evaluated in relation to TS resistance. No significant correlation of PH with AUDPC was found, yet a significant correlation (r = 0.212, p ≤ 0.05) was established between DH and AUDPC scores, suggesting that DH may have an effect on TS development. Moreover, correlation between seedling and adult reactions was significant (r = 0.695, p ≤ 0.001). Although susceptible accessions clustered separately from resistant accessions, the clustering was independent of the country of origin and the status of improvement of the wheat accessions. In total, 67% and 80% of resistant and moderately resistant accessions, respectively, were landraces, suggesting therefore the possible presence of novel sources of resistance to Ptr in some landraces, which can be used to establish a breeding program for resistance to tan spot disease. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biotic and Abiotic Stresses in Crop Plants)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
An Automatic Light Stress Grading Architecture Based on Feature Optimization and Convolutional Neural Network
Agriculture 2021, 11(11), 1126; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/agriculture11111126 - 11 Nov 2021
Viewed by 361
Abstract
The identification of light stress is crucial for light control in plant factories. Image-based lighting classification of leafy vegetables has exhibited remarkable performance with high convenience and economy. Convolutional Neural Network (CNN) has been widely used for crop image analysis because of its [...] Read more.
The identification of light stress is crucial for light control in plant factories. Image-based lighting classification of leafy vegetables has exhibited remarkable performance with high convenience and economy. Convolutional Neural Network (CNN) has been widely used for crop image analysis because of its architecture, high accuracy and efficiency. Among them, large intra-class differences and small inter-class differences are important factors affecting crop identification and a critical challenge for fine-grained classification tasks based on CNN. To address this problem, we took the Lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) widely grown in plant factories as the research object and constructed a leaf image set containing four stress levels. Then a light stress grading model combined with classic pre-trained CNN and Triplet loss function is constructed, which is named Tr-CNN. The model uses the Triplet loss function to constrain the distance of images in the feature space, which can reduce the Euclidean distance of the samples from the same class and increase the heterogeneous Euclidean distance. Multiple sets of experimental results indicate that the model proposed in this paper (Tr-CNN) has obvious advantages in light stress grading dataset and generalized dataset. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biotic and Abiotic Stresses in Crop Plants)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
A New Breeding Strategy towards Introgression and Characterization of Stay-Green QTL for Drought Tolerance in Sorghum
Agriculture 2021, 11(7), 598; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/agriculture11070598 - 28 Jun 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 554
Abstract
Several marker-assisted selection (MAS) or backcrossing (MAB) approaches exist for polygenic trait improvement. However, the implementation of MAB remains a challenge in many breeding programs, especially in the public sector. In MAB introgression programs, which usually do not include phenotypic selection, undesired donor [...] Read more.
Several marker-assisted selection (MAS) or backcrossing (MAB) approaches exist for polygenic trait improvement. However, the implementation of MAB remains a challenge in many breeding programs, especially in the public sector. In MAB introgression programs, which usually do not include phenotypic selection, undesired donor traits may unexpectedly turn up regardless of how expensive and theoretically powerful a backcross scheme may be. Therefore, combining genotyping and phenotyping during selection will improve understanding of QTL interactions with the environment, especially for minor alleles that maximize the phenotypic expression of the traits. Here, we describe the introgression of stay-green QTL (Stg1–Stg4) from B35 into two sorghum backgrounds through an MAB that combines genotypic and phenotypic (C-MAB) selection during early backcross cycles. The background selection step is excluded. Since it is necessary to decrease further the cost associated with molecular marker assays, the costs of C-MAB were estimated. Lines with stay-green trait and good performance were identified at an early backcross generation, backcross two (BC2). Developed BC2F4 lines were evaluated under irrigated and drought as well as three rainfed environments varied in drought timing and severity. Under drought conditions, the mean grain yield of the most C-MAB-introgression lines was consistently higher than that of the recurrent parents. This study is one of the real applications of the successful use of C-MAB for the development of drought-tolerant sorghum lines for drought-prone areas. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biotic and Abiotic Stresses in Crop Plants)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Communication
Comprehensive Analysis of the Histone Deacetylase Gene Family in Chinese Cabbage (Brassica rapa): From Evolution and Expression Pattern to Functional Analysis of BraHDA3
Agriculture 2021, 11(3), 244; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/agriculture11030244 - 12 Mar 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 613
Abstract
Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are known as erasers that remove acetyl groups from lysine residues in histones. Although plant HDACs play essential roles in physiological processes, including various stress responses, our knowledge concerning HDAC gene families and their evolutionary relationship remains limited. In Brassica [...] Read more.
Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are known as erasers that remove acetyl groups from lysine residues in histones. Although plant HDACs play essential roles in physiological processes, including various stress responses, our knowledge concerning HDAC gene families and their evolutionary relationship remains limited. In Brassica rapa genome, we identified 20 HDAC genes, which are divided into three major groups: RPD3/HDA1, HD2, and SIR2 families. In addition, seven pairs of segmental duplicated paralogs and one pair of tandem duplicated paralogs were identified in the B. rapa HDAC (BraHDAC) family, indicating that segmental duplication is predominant for the expansion of the BraHDAC genes. The expression patterns of paralogous gene pairs suggest a divergence in the function of BraHDACs under various stress conditions. Furthermore, we suggested that BraHDA3 (homologous of Arabidopsis HDA14) encodes the functional HDAC enzyme, which can be inhibited by Class I/II HDAC inhibitor SAHA. As a first step toward understanding the epigenetic responses to environmental stresses in Chinese cabbage, our results provide a solid foundation for functional analysis of the BraHDAC family. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biotic and Abiotic Stresses in Crop Plants)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

 
Back to TopTop