Special Issue "Breeding and Genetics to Shape Rice Production Systems in the New Climatic Scenario"

A special issue of Agriculture (ISSN 2077-0472). This special issue belongs to the section "Genotype Evaluation and Breeding".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 January 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Elisabetta Lupotto
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Council for Agricultural Research and Economics (CREA), Research Centre for Food and Nutrition, Via Ardeatina 546, 00178 Rome, Italy
Interests: genetics; genomics; cereals; rice; biotechnology; food systems; food and nutrition; food quality
Prof. Dr. Luigi Cattivelli
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Council for Agricultural Research and Economics (CREA), Research Centre for Genomics and Bioinformatics, Via S. Protaso 302, 29017 Fiorenzuola d’Arda (PC), Italy
Interests: cereals; genomics; functional genomics; cereal breeding
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Giampiero Valè
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Dipartimento di Scienze e Innovazione Tecnologica, Università del Piemonte Orientale, Piazza S. Eusebio 5, 13100 Vercelli, Italy
Interests: cereals, rice genetics and genomics; genetic mapping; stress tolerance; molecular breeding

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are incredibly pleased to announce a Special Issue of the journal Agriculture on “Breeding and Genetics to Shape Rice Production Systems in the New Climatic Scenario”.

Rice represents the staple food for more than half of the world’s population, but several climate-change-related biotic and abiotic factors as well as the need for lowering agricultural inputs are threatening sustainable production all over the world. As an important source of calories and a basic food ingredient, rice serves as a vehicle for nutritional components that affect human diet, quality of life, and longevity in developed and developing countries.

This Special Issue aims to identify and review the latest developments in rice genetics, genomics, and marker-assisted breeding, aimed at improving rice tolerance to biotic and abiotic constrains, increasing the exploitation of natural resources for lowering chemical inputs, and implementing nutritional quality of rice end products.

We are facing a very challenging time, and within the paradigm of One Health, agriculture will need to find the proper modalities to feed the planet in a safer and more sustainable way.

As Guest Editors of this Special Issue, we kindly invite you to submit your articles, as original research, reviews, opinions, and short communications.

Dr. Elisabetta Lupotto
Prof. Dr. Luigi Cattivelli
Prof. Dr. Giampiero Valè
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Agriculture is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

 

Keywords

  • Rice
  • Breeding
  • Genetics
  • Marker-assisted breeding
  • New breeding techniques
  • Stress tolerance
  • Nutritional quality
 

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Article
Impact of Genetic Improvements of Rice on Its Water Use and Effects of Climate Variability in Egypt
Agriculture 2021, 11(9), 865; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/agriculture11090865 - 10 Sep 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 580
Abstract
Developing and disseminating resilient rice cultivars with increased productivity is a key solution to the problem of limited natural resources such as land and water. We investigated trends in rice cultivation areas and the overall production in Egypt between 2000 and 2018. This [...] Read more.
Developing and disseminating resilient rice cultivars with increased productivity is a key solution to the problem of limited natural resources such as land and water. We investigated trends in rice cultivation areas and the overall production in Egypt between 2000 and 2018. This study identified rice cultivars that showed potential for high productivity when cultivated under limited irrigation. The results indicated that there were significant annual reductions in both the rice-cultivated area (−1.7% per year) and the production (−1.9% per year) during the study period. Among the commonly cultivated varieties, Sakha101 showed the highest land unit productivity, while Sakha102 showed the highest water unit productivity. The impact of deploying new cultivars was analyzed by substitution scenarios. The results showed that substituting cultivars Giza179 and Sakha107 has the potential to increase land productivity by 15.8% and 22.6%, respectively. This could result in 0.8 million m3 in water savings compared to 2018 water consumption. Long-term impacts of climate variability on the minimum and maximum temperature, relative humidity, and average precipitation during on- and off-season for rice productivity were also analyzed using an autoregressive distributed lag (ARDL) model. The results indicated that climate variability has an overall negative impact on rice productivity. Specifically, minimum temperature and on- and off-season precipitation had major long-term impacts, while higher relative humidity had a pronounced short-term impact on rice yields. The study revealed that short-duration cultivars with higher yields provided greater net savings in irrigation resources. These analyses are critical to guide the development of strategic management plans to mitigate short- and long-term climate effects on overall rice production and for developing and deploying improved rice varieties for sustainable rice production. Full article
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Article
Combining Ability and Gene Action for Yield Characteristics in Novel Aromatic Cytoplasmic Male Sterile Hybrid Rice under Water-Stress Conditions
Agriculture 2021, 11(3), 226; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/agriculture11030226 - 09 Mar 2021
Viewed by 753
Abstract
Hybrid rice parental lines with better combining abilities provide an efficient tool to increase rice production. In the current study, twenty hybrid combinations were generated from five aromatic cytoplasmic male sterile (CMS) lines and four restorer lines (three of them aromatic) using a [...] Read more.
Hybrid rice parental lines with better combining abilities provide an efficient tool to increase rice production. In the current study, twenty hybrid combinations were generated from five aromatic cytoplasmic male sterile (CMS) lines and four restorer lines (three of them aromatic) using a line × tester mating design. The hybrids and their parental lines were evaluated under two water regimes: normal irrigation and water-stress. Ten yield-component traits were studied over a period of 2 years, and the significant differences between the parents and hybrids are reported in this investigation. Overall, all yield component traits were significantly affected by the water deficit and were governed by both additive and non-additive gene actions. More specifically, the grain yield (GY) was mainly controlled by non-additive gene action under both normal and water-stress conditions. The contribution of the additive variance (σ2 A) was more prominent in the genetic components of traits as compared to the dominance variance (σ2 D). The aromatic parental line CMS IR58025A and the restorer line PR2 were recorded as the best combiners for the GY and good combiners for many other characteristics under both growth conditions. The cross combinations Pusa12A/IR25571-31R and Pusa12A/Giza-Basmati-201 revealed significantly positive specific combining ability (SCA) effects for the GY under both normal and water-stress conditions. The inconsistent correlation between the general combining ability (GCA) and SCA manifested complex interactions among the positive and negative alleles of the genes controlling the yield traits. Generally, the findings of this investigation demonstrated the importance of the GCA and SCA for understanding the genetic components and gene actions of the yield characteristics in new aromatic hybrid rice parental lines. Therefore, we recommend considering these findings in the selection of elite parents for developing superior aromatic hybrid rice varieties under water-stress conditions. Full article
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Review

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Review
Crosstalk between Nutrient Signalling Pathways and Immune Responses in Rice
Agriculture 2021, 11(8), 747; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/agriculture11080747 - 06 Aug 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 638
Abstract
Rice is a staple food for more than half of the global population. Rice production is, however, severely affected by biotic and abiotic stresses. Fertilisers and pesticides are widely used in rice farming to maintain optimal yield and to prevent losses caused by [...] Read more.
Rice is a staple food for more than half of the global population. Rice production is, however, severely affected by biotic and abiotic stresses. Fertilisers and pesticides are widely used in rice farming to maintain optimal yield and to prevent losses caused by environmental stress. However, the indiscriminate use of agrochemicals has adverse effects on the environment and human health. Stress caused by nutrient excess or deficiency has an impact on plant disease resistance. The interference of plant responses induced by nutrient stress can result in a positive or negative impact on resistance to pathogen infection. In this review, we explore the effects of combined stresses in rice, focusing on nutrient stress, such as nitrogen and phosphorous supply, and infection by fungal pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae, the causal agent of rice blast disease. Crosstalk between nutrient stress-induced and pathogen-induced signalling pathways in rice is discussed, as well, with particular emphasis on regulatory microRNAs. Understanding the interconnected regulations between nutrient stress and disease resistance will lay a foundation for rationally optimising fertiliser and pesticide use in rice production. Full article
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Review
Value of Wholegrain Rice in a Healthy Human Nutrition
Agriculture 2021, 11(8), 720; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/agriculture11080720 - 29 Jul 2021
Viewed by 560
Abstract
Rice is one of the most widely consumed cereals in the world. The husks of harvested, unprocessed rice are not digested by humans and need to be removed to obtain edible grains, whereas the bran can be partially (brown rice) or totally removed [...] Read more.
Rice is one of the most widely consumed cereals in the world. The husks of harvested, unprocessed rice are not digested by humans and need to be removed to obtain edible grains, whereas the bran can be partially (brown rice) or totally removed (white rice). Brown rice is a wholegrain cereal and, as such, is known to have beneficial effects on human health. Recent epidemiological studies have shown that the consumption of whole grains can reduce the risk of metabolic disorders, cardiovascular diseases, and some types of cancer. However, white rice is preferred for reasons connected to appearance, taste, palatability, ease of cooking, tradition, safety, shelf-life, and lack of awareness about its benefits and availability. In this review, the latest scientific reports regarding the nutritional composition of brown rice and the evolution of the technology for its production will be briefly reviewed together with research on nutritional implications of brown rice consumption also in relation to cancer development in humans. A specific chapter is devoted to pigmented rice which, thanks to its composition, has attracted the growing interest of consumers worldwide. The need for further studies to help promote the consumption of wholegrain rice are also discussed. Full article

Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

 
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