Special Issue "Agricultural Food Marketing, Economics and Policies"

A special issue of Agriculture (ISSN 2077-0472). This special issue belongs to the section "Agricultural Economics, Policies and Rural Management".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 December 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Giuseppe Timpanaro
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Agricultural, Food and Environment, University of Catania, 95123 Catania, Italy
Interests: economic and environmental sustainability; environmental impact assessment; agri-food economics; efficiency analysis; food supply chain management; strategic marketing planning; agri-food economics; consumer economics (theory and empirical applications); agri-food supply chain management; food chain logistics and ICT; economics of technological innovation in the agri-food industry
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

As is well known, agriculture and food production have been—for some time now—called upon to become more sustainable in the global context of rising population and living standards, climate change, and environmental degradation. According to existing literature, this can be done through the development of innovative ways and tools to reduce resource use, reduce material consumption and waste production, and reverse the trend of biodiversity loss, while ensuring that society is provided with sufficient, nutritious, sustainable, and affordable food. Such a general need, shared at international political level, is today overwhelmingly urgent due to the need to recover from the crisis triggered by the COVID-19 pandemic, which has accentuated the effects of degrowth. The North and South of the world need a new economic model more oriented toward equity, restructuring of production, and consumption models, sobriety combined with full employment and social security, as well as food security and local agriculture. This is perfectly in line with the importance of food and agriculture in achieving the 17 UN Sustainable Development Goals, all directly or indirectly related to food, and in accelerating the transition to Agenda 2030.

In this general context, research and reflection contributions, developed in different territorial contexts, are well accepted:

  • Policies at different levels of decision making, both in order to capture orientations toward the creation of healthy and sustainable food environments and to characterize forms of integrated and shared responsibilities between civil society, businesses, policy makers, and producers aimed at dialogue and cooperation for the creation of sustainable development hubs;
  • Aspects of production that promote regenerative and agro-ecological agricultural practices and healthy and sustainable food systems; organizational and management changes brought about by the COVID-19 crisis; organizational and management changes aimed at achieving the Millennium Goals;
  • Agri-food supply chain and its orientation on health and sustainability, to analyze the level of involvement of the business system in change and to identify areas for improvement from field to table, also aiming at reducing food losses and waste; to analyze to what extent sustainability is an integral part of business strategies; to ensure the transparency of its processes throughout the supply chain; to strengthen regional and local supply chains to improve distribution, helping to guarantee the right to food;
  • Agri-food marketing, to analyze food needs, preferences, and cultures; the level of information on the economic, social, and environmental impacts of daily food choices; technological, digital, and geospatial solutions aimed at creating knowledge networks to exchange information on more sustainable choices and innovative solutions by farmers and producers; to promote training programs and awareness campaigns to make food production and consumption patterns healthier and more sustainable and to adopt more responsible food behavior to reduce the environmental, economic, and social impact of food waste.

Prof. Giuseppe Timpanaro
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Agriculture is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Recovery from the crisis by COVID-19
  • Regenerative and agro-ecological agricultural practices
  • Sustainable agricultural practices to improve soil health and fertility, biodiversity, water savings, and nutrient densities in crops and reduce greenhouse gas emissions
  • Global standards for food safety, nutrition and food quality
  • Protection of natural resources and ecosystems
  • Reduction of food loss and waste
  • Business strategies
  • Regional and local supply chains
  • Right to food, food security, and food sovereignty
  • Technological, digital, and geospatial solutions and agro-food blockchain
  • Data protection and regulation
  • Finance and investment that contribute to public health and reduce negative environmental externalities, increasing the resilience of land use
  • Protection of plants from pests and emerging diseases
  • Sustainable development hub
  • Labeling highlighting the interconnection between food, climate, environment, and social justice
  • Global resilience and actions addressing climate change
  • Analysis of consumption (theory and empirical applications)
  • analysis of commercial distribution
  • Marketing of agri-food products
  • Food security and food sovereignty
  • Local and sustainable supply chains
  • Bioregional whole systems design
  • Assessment of ecosystem services and profitability for farmers
  • Comparison between intensive and sustainable production models
  • Agri-food supply chain management
  • Food chain logistics and ICT

Published Papers (27 papers)

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Research

Article
Farmers’ Perception of Entrepreneurial Success: Evidence from the Greek Reality
Agriculture 2021, 11(12), 1192; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/agriculture11121192 (registering DOI) - 26 Nov 2021
Viewed by 86
Abstract
The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the perceptions of Greeks-farmers regarding success and to investigate the factors that are considered as indicators to explain, predict, and determine perceptional entrepreneurial success. This research focuses on existing agricultural enterprises as more than 400 [...] Read more.
The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the perceptions of Greeks-farmers regarding success and to investigate the factors that are considered as indicators to explain, predict, and determine perceptional entrepreneurial success. This research focuses on existing agricultural enterprises as more than 400 randomly selected agricultural enterprises compose the survey’s sample. The main research method is through structured questionnaires. A series of multivariate analyses were conducted to examine the data. A stepwise procedure was used to identify the relevant variable and the significant ones were identified based on the ‘F’ test. The results of a discriminant analysis indicate that seven predictors (internal LOC, pull motivation, push motivation, internal funding, innovativeness, entrepreneurial capacity, and educational background) have a significant impact on the dependent variable “perceived entrepreneurial success”. Pull motivation is the most important variable to discriminate the groups. The value of this study lies in the fact that it is an original attempt to assess the parameters that could explain the perceived entrepreneurial success of agripreneurs; a focus that is lacking in previous studies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Agricultural Food Marketing, Economics and Policies)
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Article
Food and Consumer Attitude(s): An Overview of the Most Relevant Documents
Agriculture 2021, 11(12), 1183; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/agriculture11121183 (registering DOI) - 23 Nov 2021
Viewed by 121
Abstract
Food markets have, at least, two dimensions. One is related to supply, where food marketing, for example, plays a determinant role, namely to promote healthy and balanced consumption. The other dimension is associated with demand, where it is important to understand and bring [...] Read more.
Food markets have, at least, two dimensions. One is related to supply, where food marketing, for example, plays a determinant role, namely to promote healthy and balanced consumption. The other dimension is associated with demand, where it is important to understand and bring insights about consumer attitudes, because they have implications on patterns of food consumption. In this framework, the main objective of this research is to suggest an alternative approach for conducting systematic reviews based on bibliometric analysis and implement it on topics about food and consumer attitudes. For this purpose, the most important bibliographic items (authors, sources, organizations, countries and documents) were identified and later the most relevant documents were reviewed. In addition, 908 documents were selected on 11 December 2020 from the Web of Science Core Collection, for the topics “food” and “consumer attitude*”, and analyzed through bibliometric analysis with the support of the VOSviewer and Gephi software. These documents were also benchmarked with those available in the Scopus scientific database. The approach presented here made it possible to highlight the main insights from the scientific literature related to consumer attitudes to food and bring about further contributions to a literature review supported by bibliometric analysis. This proposal may be known as MB2MBA2 (Methodology Based on Benchmarking of Metadata, from scientific databases, and Bibliometric Assessment and Analysis). This systematic review highlights that organic foods, food neophobia, climate change, marketing strategies and interrelationships between motivations–consumer attitudes–perceptions–purchase intentions–purchase decisions (MAPID) deserved special attention. In addition, MAPID interactions are impacted, among other dimensions, by labelling, branding and trust in the information provided. Future research should further address impacts on consumer attitudes towards food, such as those related to climate-smart agriculture, food 4.0, food security and protection, and climate change and malnutrition. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Agricultural Food Marketing, Economics and Policies)
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Article
Research on Government Subsidy Strategies for the Development of Agricultural Products E-Commerce
Agriculture 2021, 11(11), 1152; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/agriculture11111152 - 17 Nov 2021
Viewed by 230
Abstract
In many countries, the governments support the development of local agriculture through subsidization. Subsidizing the sales of agricultural products through E-commerce channels is a way to support the development of agriculture in China. This study aims to develop a profit model and apply [...] Read more.
In many countries, the governments support the development of local agriculture through subsidization. Subsidizing the sales of agricultural products through E-commerce channels is a way to support the development of agriculture in China. This study aims to develop a profit model and apply Stackelberg game theory to determine which type of subsidies and decision-making can provide the maximum benefits for agricultural products E-commerce supply chains. The results indicate that for both centralized decisions and decentralized decisions, the subsidizing to the agricultural cooperative is better than the subsidizing to consumers and no subsidization. The sales volume, preservation level, sales efforts, and overall profit of the agricultural products E-commerce supply chain are significantly higher. It suggests that the government should play a leading role to support the development of agricultural products E-commerce. This study contributes to agricultural research by developing a profit model to examine the effects of different government subsidy strategies on each member of the agricultural online shopping supply chain. Recommendations are provided for agricultural cooperatives, E-commerce platforms, and the government to improve the quality and sales of agricultural products through online shopping channels. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Agricultural Food Marketing, Economics and Policies)
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Article
Choices in Sustainable Food Consumption: How Spanish Low Intake Organic Consumers Behave
Agriculture 2021, 11(11), 1125; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/agriculture11111125 - 10 Nov 2021
Viewed by 269
Abstract
The consumption of organic products has consistently increased over the last decades, covering increasingly diversified consumers, both in the characteristics and the reasons associated with consumption. This heterogeneity evidences the need to examine in depth the reasons for the purchase and consumption of [...] Read more.
The consumption of organic products has consistently increased over the last decades, covering increasingly diversified consumers, both in the characteristics and the reasons associated with consumption. This heterogeneity evidences the need to examine in depth the reasons for the purchase and consumption of these products. The core aim of this study is related to the motivational drivers of organic consumption. The survey included 250 respondents from Andalusia (Spain) who completed an online questionnaire and personal interviews. A convenience sampling method was applied, and the best-worst scaling method allowed us to analyze ten attributes of organic purchasing behavior. Health benefits and environmental impact are the key attributes explaining the consumption of organic products. To deeply understand organic consumer motivations, we studied the influence of six classification variables over the studied attributes. Applying ordinal regressions, we found that having children under 18 at home and a consumer’s academic level contribute in a relevant way to explain the valorization of the health benefits attribute. Also, the place to purchase organic food and academic level correlates with the valuation of GMOs in food. Andalusia is one of the largest European regions for organic production but with minor relevance in consumption. Nevertheless, despite this apparent paradox, the results of the present study point to a consumer profile very similar to other European countries with consolidated organic consumption. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Agricultural Food Marketing, Economics and Policies)
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Article
Factors Influencing Technical Efficiency in the EU Dairy Farms
Agriculture 2021, 11(11), 1114; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/agriculture11111114 - 09 Nov 2021
Viewed by 260
Abstract
This paper aims to analyse the technical efficiency (TE) of dairy farms and find its determinants. To accomplish this problem, the Stochastic Frontier Analysis was applied. The data were obtained from the Farm Accountancy Data Network database for dairy farms (TF15-45—Specialist dairying) for [...] Read more.
This paper aims to analyse the technical efficiency (TE) of dairy farms and find its determinants. To accomplish this problem, the Stochastic Frontier Analysis was applied. The data were obtained from the Farm Accountancy Data Network database for dairy farms (TF15-45—Specialist dairying) for 2004–2019. Dairy farms were divided into four clusters according to their physical size (number of livestock units per farm) and economic size (standard output per farm). The largest farms by physical and economic size are located in Denmark and Cyprus. The smallest, in comparison, are in Bulgaria, Croatia, Latvia, Lithuania, Austria, Poland, Romania, and Slovenia. Farms in the EU are relatively technically efficient, i.e., they use their resources efficiently to produce maximum output (production). However, they have the potential to achieve better economic results and be more competitive, as the size of farms’ is not fully optimised. The abolition of the milk quota can be considered a factor in improving technical efficiency, as the indicator is higher after the abolition. New and old member states have almost comparable technical efficiency levels (the p-value of the t-test is 0.463), with old members having slightly higher level TE. Subsidies have contradictory effects on TE. Farm efficiency with higher subsidies per cow is higher for farms with €51–100/cow. However, as subsidies increase, TE decreases. Only the group of farms with the highest subsidies has a higher TE. More diversified farms are more technically efficient than specialised farms. Milk yield did not influence the analysed indicator. The analysis results can serve the stakeholders as a tool for modelling future agricultural policy, as the European farms are very heterogenous and show different conditions and economic outcomes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Agricultural Food Marketing, Economics and Policies)
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Article
Determinants of Farmers’ Confidence in Agricultural Production Recovery during the Early Phases of the COVID-19 Pandemic in China
Agriculture 2021, 11(11), 1075; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/agriculture11111075 - 31 Oct 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 365
Abstract
The COVID-19 pandemic has adversely impacted the agricultural supply chain, export of agricultural products, and overall food security. However, minimal exploration has been attempted of farmers’ confidence in agricultural production recovery after the COVID-19 pandemic. Therefore, this study intends to explore the determinants [...] Read more.
The COVID-19 pandemic has adversely impacted the agricultural supply chain, export of agricultural products, and overall food security. However, minimal exploration has been attempted of farmers’ confidence in agricultural production recovery after the COVID-19 pandemic. Therefore, this study intends to explore the determinants of farmers’ confidence in agricultural production recovery in China during the early stages of the COVID-19 pandemic. More specifically, we analyzed the relationship between risk expectation and social support on the farmers’ confidence in agricultural production recovery by using the ordered probit model. Cross-sectional survey data were collected from February to March 2020 from 458 farm households in the 7 provinces of China to produce the findings. We found that the risk expectation of farmers had a significant negative impact on farmers’ confidence in agricultural production recovery. Social support seemingly had a significant positive impact on the farmers’ confidence in agricultural production recovery, and could play a supportive role in moderating the relationship between risk expectation and farmers’ confidence in recovery. However, social support alleviates the adverse effect of risk expectation on farmers’ confidence in agricultural production recovery to a certain extent. In addition, there were intergenerational differences in the effects of risk expectation and social support on farmers’ confidence in agricultural production recovery. These results imply that policies establishing the risk early warning mechanisms for agricultural production and strengthening the social support from governments and financial institutions are likely to significantly impact agricultural development in the post-COVID-19 era. The formal and informal risk minimization mechanisms should extend their support to vulnerable sectors such as agribusiness. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Agricultural Food Marketing, Economics and Policies)
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Article
Factors Influencing Wine Purchasing by Generation Y and Older Cohorts on the Serbian Wine Market
Agriculture 2021, 11(11), 1054; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/agriculture11111054 - 27 Oct 2021
Viewed by 381
Abstract
This research investigates current preferences in wine purchase patterns and factors that affect the online purchase of wine by Generation Y and older cohorts in the Republic of Serbia. Our research utilizes descriptive statistics, chi-squared tests, the Mann–Whitney nonparametric test, and binary logistic [...] Read more.
This research investigates current preferences in wine purchase patterns and factors that affect the online purchase of wine by Generation Y and older cohorts in the Republic of Serbia. Our research utilizes descriptive statistics, chi-squared tests, the Mann–Whitney nonparametric test, and binary logistic regression. The results indicate that wine purchasing is conducted on an occasional basis—mostly monthly and weekly—with a tendency to buy wine throughout the whole year. The older cohort has a more pronounced rank, compared to Generation Y, regarding WTP for wines with a specific geographical origin and local wines. Although Generation Y and the older cohort have no habit of buying wine online, the information on geographical origin represents the most important online information related to online purchase intention. The strongest influence on online wine purchasing among members of the older cohort is a link that connects producers with consumers to allow the latter to obtain additional information and send remarks, suggestions, and/or praise, as well as a link to the winemakers’ association website, and the very significant influence of female gender. The strongest influence on online wine purchasing in Generation Y is the information on geographical origin. Female gender and income are also very significant. As wine consumption in the Republic of Serbia is gradually increasing, a growing interest in online wine purchases is expected. Our findings can provide useful information for building profiles of online wine consumers, depending on age cohort. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Agricultural Food Marketing, Economics and Policies)
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Article
Consumers’ Attitude towards Sustainable Food Consumption during the COVID-19 Pandemic in Romania
Agriculture 2021, 11(11), 1050; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/agriculture11111050 - 26 Oct 2021
Viewed by 481
Abstract
The COVID-19 pandemic affected consumers’ behavior worldwide. This paper aims to analyze consumers’ sustainable food behavior during the COVID-19 pandemic. The research was based on an online survey during May–October 2020 among 859 Romanian consumers. Principal component analysis and cluster analysis were employed [...] Read more.
The COVID-19 pandemic affected consumers’ behavior worldwide. This paper aims to analyze consumers’ sustainable food behavior during the COVID-19 pandemic. The research was based on an online survey during May–October 2020 among 859 Romanian consumers. Principal component analysis and cluster analysis were employed to group the consumers based on their behavior. Furthermore, the binary-logistic regression was used to identify the socio-demographic profile of the identified groups. Based on the cluster analysis, the consumers were grouped into three main groups: indifferent, pro-environment protection, and health concerned. The results indicate a positive attitude towards sustainable food behavior. Consumers’ attitude towards sustainable food choice is mainly influenced by age and education level. The study offers valuable information for future public policy and marketing campaign regarding sustainable food behavior. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Agricultural Food Marketing, Economics and Policies)
Article
Household Labour Migration and Farmers’ Access to Productive Agricultural Services: A Case Study from Chinese Provinces
Agriculture 2021, 11(10), 976; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/agriculture11100976 - 09 Oct 2021
Viewed by 368
Abstract
Household labour migration experiences may have a staggering impact within developing countries, especially in dynamic societies like China, where labour migration is obvious. The present study’s objective is to investigate whether household labour migration contributes to the probability of farmers’ access to productive [...] Read more.
Household labour migration experiences may have a staggering impact within developing countries, especially in dynamic societies like China, where labour migration is obvious. The present study’s objective is to investigate whether household labour migration contributes to the probability of farmers’ access to productive agricultural services. The study’s empirical setup is comprised of household survey data of 541 farmers in Shaanxi, Henan, and Sichuan provinces. The study proposes a counterfactual model to evaluate the average processing effect of an urban migrant with the help of the endogenous transformation of the Probit model. The results show that labour migration for work directly affects farmers’ access to productive agricultural services and indirectly affects farmers’ access to productive agricultural services through three channels: labour input, land transfers, and planting structure adjustments. The study further confirms that labour migration for work has a significant heterogeneity in the probability of obtaining productive agricultural services for farmers with or without non-agricultural income. Simultaneously, the labour migration area for work has significant heterogeneity in the probability of farmer households’ access to productive agricultural services. The government should extend support towards productive agriculture services. Agricultural demonstration services and on-hand training of migrant labour should be highlighted. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Agricultural Food Marketing, Economics and Policies)
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Article
Magnitude, Causes and Scope for Reducing Food Losses in the Baking and Confectionery Industry—A Multi-Method Approach
Agriculture 2021, 11(10), 936; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/agriculture11100936 - 28 Sep 2021
Viewed by 453
Abstract
Reducing food wastage is one of the challenges in achieving global food security and transforming current food systems. Since human nutrition is closely dependent on cereal production, research was undertaken aimed at understanding the food losses in the baking and confectionery industry (BCI) [...] Read more.
Reducing food wastage is one of the challenges in achieving global food security and transforming current food systems. Since human nutrition is closely dependent on cereal production, research was undertaken aimed at understanding the food losses in the baking and confectionery industry (BCI) in Poland, in particular at determining the volume, reasons and ways of reducing losses, identifying possibly all of the reasons for losses in BCI using the Ishikawa 5M + 1E diagram and determining the level of significance and probability of risk of food losses in the analysed sector. Two research methods were used. Quantitative data were collected using the mass balance method from five businesses that served as case studies. Qualitative data were collected through individual in-depth interviews with 17 industry experts. The companies’ average daily losses ranged from 0.8 to 6.4 tons, representing 9.7 to 14.4% of production volume, including 10.4–13.4% of bread losses and 6.8–24.4% of fresh pastry losses. The highest losses were generated by transport departments and these were exclusively retail returns. Following the Ishikawa concept, 31 primary and 94 secondary reasons for food losses were identified. Using the probability of loss risk, a toolkit for loss prevention and mitigation across all departments within businesses (raw materials magazine, production section, final product magazine and final product transport) and a set of horizontal tools were identified, including specialised training for employees and activities in several areas, e.g., technical status and production technology, organisation and planning, logistics and sales and cooperation with retail. This study, conducted in Poland, offers valuable results for developing programmes and strategies to prevent and manage food losses in BCI. Many of the solutions proposed in both toolkits can bring economic benefits without involving additional high costs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Agricultural Food Marketing, Economics and Policies)
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Article
Application of Fuzzy Delphi Technique Approach in Sustainable Inheritance of Rural Cooking Techniques and Innovative Business Strategies Modeling
Agriculture 2021, 11(10), 924; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/agriculture11100924 - 26 Sep 2021
Viewed by 485
Abstract
Transformation and sustainable development must be undertaken in accordance with the trends of the times, which presents challenges to rural areas worldwide. In addition to preserving rural food specialties and presenting them in new ways to attract consumers, these areas must link farmers’ [...] Read more.
Transformation and sustainable development must be undertaken in accordance with the trends of the times, which presents challenges to rural areas worldwide. In addition to preserving rural food specialties and presenting them in new ways to attract consumers, these areas must link farmers’ production, processing, sales, and management. It is imperative to sustainably pass on rural foods and theircooking techniques and integrate them into innovative business strategies so that delicious rural foods can be sold on the consumer market, boosting rural economies and their development. The main objective of this research was to conduct indicator modeling and empirical analysis for the sustainable inheritance of Taiwan’s rural cooking techniques and the development of innovative marketing strategies. The Fuzzy Delphi Technique was used as the main research method to select agricultural experts and rural household economy organizations for indicator modeling and empirical analysis. The results of the research indicate that agricultural experts believe that market operation is the primary developmental focus of cultural inheritance and innovation, whereas household economy organizations believe that education, training, promotion, and development are the primary developmental focuses. The greatest contribution and innovation of this research are the findings that culinary education and training, organized by the farmers’ association, can sustainably pass on traditional rural cooking techniques, and the process of incorporating local ingredients into commercial gourmet food should also consider aspects of the economic and marketing strategies of market operation, facilitating the sustainable inheritance of unique, traditional, local, and rural food culture. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Agricultural Food Marketing, Economics and Policies)
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Article
Village Environment, Capital Endowment, and Farmers’ Participation in E-Commerce Sales Behavior: A Demand Observable Bivariate Probit Model Approach
Agriculture 2021, 11(9), 868; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/agriculture11090868 - 10 Sep 2021
Viewed by 534
Abstract
With the recent developments in widespread internet usage and digital technology, an ultimate worldwide transformation in information and communications technology has occurred. Especially, how people engage in the virtual market for buying and selling goods has changed dramatically, which flourished the playground of [...] Read more.
With the recent developments in widespread internet usage and digital technology, an ultimate worldwide transformation in information and communications technology has occurred. Especially, how people engage in the virtual market for buying and selling goods has changed dramatically, which flourished the playground of electronic commerce (EC). Interestingly, it has become crucial to create an ample opportunity for farmers to utilize a more comprehensive market range for selling their products. However, farmers participating in e-commerce sales platforms may be interrupted by various internal and external factors. Therefore, the study’s primary goal is to evaluate the impacts of various external and internal factors on shaping farmers’ behavior in participating in e-commerce sales platforms. The study utilized a demand observable bivariate Probit model to analyze the village environment and capital endowment effects to craft the findings. The study utilized micro-survey data from 686 households in the leading kiwifruit-producing area as the empirical setup. The findings illustrated that the village environment is the main factor that restricts farmers’ e-commerce sales behavior, among which the infrastructure and policy environments have a significant contribution to farmers’ e-commerce sales intention and behavior. However, the effect of capital endowment on farmers’ e-commerce selling behavior has been found as significant. The village environment significantly affects both large- and small-scale farmers, and the capital endowment has a higher binding effect on small-scale farmers. Therefore, the paper suggests that improving the village environment for e-commerce development and laying the foundation for e-commerce development should be fostered. A differentiated incentive mechanism to improve the capital endowment of farmers should be constructed. A well-structured capital endowment triggering small farmers to capture the benefits of e-commerce sales should be imposed. The government should extend the support of the agricultural demonstration zone to facilitate practical training among the smallholder farmers. The formal and informal risk-sharing and financial institutions should prioritize building infrastructure to support farmers’ short- and long-term investments. Farmers should realize the importance of e-commerce for integrating the agricultural value chain. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Agricultural Food Marketing, Economics and Policies)
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Article
Measurement of Investment Potential and Spatial Distribution of Arable Land among Countries within the “Belt and Road Initiative”
Agriculture 2021, 11(9), 848; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/agriculture11090848 - 05 Sep 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 570
Abstract
The belt and road initiative (BRI) is a mutual development approach projected by China, which delivers exceptional opportunities for multi-phased communication and cooperation across Asia, Africa, and Europe. It opens ample opportunities for China to easily invest in overseas arable land. Based on [...] Read more.
The belt and road initiative (BRI) is a mutual development approach projected by China, which delivers exceptional opportunities for multi-phased communication and cooperation across Asia, Africa, and Europe. It opens ample opportunities for China to easily invest in overseas arable land. Based on the macro data of 119 countries in 2010 and 2016 before and after the BRI, the study comprehensively uses fuzzy C-means clustering and the entropy method to evaluate the potential of arable land investment from four dimensions, which existing literature has not fully grasped. Moreover, the study uses the exploratory spatial data analysis methods (ESDA), kernel density estimation, and trend surface analysis to study the spatial pattern characteristics. The results show that: (i) there are noticeable regional differences in the investment potential of arable land in BRI countries. Asian countries, led by Kazakhstan and Indonesia, and African Unions, led by Ethiopia, South Africa, and Tanzania, generally have higher investment potential. However, South America and European countries are relatively lower. (ii) Resource endowment and production conditions significantly impact overseas arable land investment potential. Asia and Africa have advantages in resource endowment and production conditions, while European countries generally have better economic and political environments. (iii) From the perspective of time evolution, the investment potential in 2016 is generally higher than in 2010, and the negative correlation and dispersion are lower than in 2010. Based on these findings, it is recommended that Chinese enterprises should comprehensively consider the differences in resource endowments and agricultural development levels in various countries, optimize investment layout, and reduce investment risks. Chinese companies should collaborate with host nations on modernization and promote the long-term viability of arable land investments. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Agricultural Food Marketing, Economics and Policies)
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Article
Facts and Myths about GM Food—The Case of Poland
Agriculture 2021, 11(8), 791; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/agriculture11080791 - 19 Aug 2021
Viewed by 1080
Abstract
The importance of biotechnology for the global economy is growing, including developments in the field of genetically modified organisms (GMO), which have revolutionized the cultivation of several major food crops. Despite the many benefits from introducing genetic modifications to crops, the Polish society [...] Read more.
The importance of biotechnology for the global economy is growing, including developments in the field of genetically modified organisms (GMO), which have revolutionized the cultivation of several major food crops. Despite the many benefits from introducing genetic modifications to crops, the Polish society shows a strong distrust towards GMO-based food. The negative attitude of the society towards genetically modified (GM) food could be considered irrational. It is not supported by adequate knowledge and is based on fears, despite the fact that there is no scientific evidence of threats of GM products towards the environment, health, or human life. Details of these perceptions were revealed within Polish society from surveys of three groups of respondents: consumers, students, farmers. Data from the surveys have been compared with the answers to the same questions by five biotechnology experts from Polish academic institutions. A general observation from the analysis of the survey results and past studies quoted in the literature review is that the level of understanding and acceptance of GMO technologies is still low in Polish society, and, to a large extent, is based on stereotypes rather than on scientific knowledge. They show broad support for the general benefits of GMOs, which does not vary between the three groups of respondents surveyed, but noticeably differs with the experts’ views. GMOs have allies, but also opponents who have their own beliefs shaped largely by unreliable information disseminated through the Internet and social media. Providing more reliable targeted information on GMOs based on scientific evidence can have an important role in changing polarized attitudes towards GM food. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Agricultural Food Marketing, Economics and Policies)
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Article
An Italian Explorative Study of Willingness to Pay for a New Functional Pasta Featuring Opuntia ficus indica
Agriculture 2021, 11(8), 701; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/agriculture11080701 - 26 Jul 2021
Viewed by 540
Abstract
Opuntia ficus indica is a source of vitamins and minerals, and recently, it has been used as ingredient to make a new functional pasta. Italy produces the highest amount of pasta in the world and it is also the second-highest producer of opuntia [...] Read more.
Opuntia ficus indica is a source of vitamins and minerals, and recently, it has been used as ingredient to make a new functional pasta. Italy produces the highest amount of pasta in the world and it is also the second-highest producer of opuntia globally. This study sought to identify the consumer willingness to pay for pasta featuring Opuntia ficus indica and to understand what factors influence their choice. This study is the first in food research to analyze consumers’ willingness to pay for a new functional pasta featuring Opuntia ficus indica. Data were collected by using a web-based survey; the sample was composed of 342 consumers and an ordered logistic regression model was applied. The findings showed that the educational and higher income levels of respondents play important roles in the willingness to pay for functional pasta. Moreover, the healthy and nutritional features of functional pasta together with the respondents’ willingness to eat it, their curiosity towards this new food and their need to get more information about functional pasta should improve consumers’ willingness to pay for it. The findings should be useful for firms to draw marketing strategies considering the positive consumers’ attitude toward the use of Opuntia ficus indica in pasta production. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Agricultural Food Marketing, Economics and Policies)
Article
An Analysis of Mushroom Consumption in Hungary in the International Context
Agriculture 2021, 11(7), 677; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/agriculture11070677 - 18 Jul 2021
Viewed by 844
Abstract
It is hardly an exaggeration to state that producing and consuming mushrooms may provide an answer to several of the challenges facing mankind. This research is related to the UN sustainable development goals relative to different issues. First of all, mushroom production uses [...] Read more.
It is hardly an exaggeration to state that producing and consuming mushrooms may provide an answer to several of the challenges facing mankind. This research is related to the UN sustainable development goals relative to different issues. First of all, mushroom production uses agricultural and industrial byproducts as inputs and being labor intensive contributes to the job and income creation for undereducated people in less developed areas. In addition, as mushrooms have high protein content and they are a suitable alternative for meat for populations with a diet lacking in variety; at the same time, they also have the potential for food connoisseurs and consumers who make conscious and educated choices to improve their diet by using healthful and environmentally friendly methods. The nutritional value of mushrooms means that consumption could be an important supplementary therapy for several illnesses. The key issue of sector development is the increasing demand. In order to address this, investigation and research related to consumer behavior is needed. The aim of this research was to explore the dimensions of Hungarian mushroom consumer behavior and to segment Hungarian consumers. An online questionnaire survey was conducted between December 2019 and February 2020 and the final sample of 1768 respondents was considered for the purposes of analysis. Exploratory factor analysis was used to identify groups of correlating variables describing mushroom consumption. The authors identified four dimensions of Hungarian mushroom consumer behavior: (1) medicinal and functional properties, (2) consumption for enjoyment, (3) supplementary food source, and (4) negative assessment of the product range. Using cluster analysis, three consumer groups were identified: (1) health-conscious consumers, (2) indifferent consumers, and (3) average consumers. The research results indicated that consumers’ sociodemographic characteristics (age, educational level, marital status, and place of residence) have a significant impact on mushroom consumption behavior. The results of this paper can have implications for policy makers and business management in diversifying their production and selecting marketing tools. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Agricultural Food Marketing, Economics and Policies)
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Article
Choice of Modern Food Distribution Channels and Its Welfare Effects: Empirical Evidence from Taiwan
Agriculture 2021, 11(6), 499; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/agriculture11060499 - 28 May 2021
Viewed by 874
Abstract
The determinants and/or economic effects of modern food distribution channels have attracted much attention in previous research. Studies on the welfare consequences of modern channel options, however, have been sparse. Based on a broader definition of modern food distribution channels including midstream processors [...] Read more.
The determinants and/or economic effects of modern food distribution channels have attracted much attention in previous research. Studies on the welfare consequences of modern channel options, however, have been sparse. Based on a broader definition of modern food distribution channels including midstream processors and downstream retailers (supermarkets, hypermarkets, brand-named retailers), this study contributes to the existing body of knowledge by exploring the distributional implications of farm households’ choice of modern food distribution channels using a large and unique farm household dataset in Taiwan. Making use of the two-step control function approach, we identify the effect of modern food distribution options on farm households’ profitability. The results reveal selling farm produce to modern food distributors does not produce a positive differential compared to the traditional outlets. Another dimension of farm household welfare affected by the choice of modern food distribution channel is income inequality. We apply the Lerman and Yitzhaki decomposition approach to gain a better understanding of the effect of the marketing channel option on the overall distribution of farm household income. The Gini decomposition of different income sources indicates that the choice of modern food distribution channels results in an inequality-equalizing effect among the farm households in Taiwan, suggesting the inclusion of smallholder farmers in the modern food distribution channels improves the overall welfare of the rural society. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Agricultural Food Marketing, Economics and Policies)
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Article
Evaluating the Impacts of Smallholder Farmer’s Participation in Modern Agricultural Value Chain Tactics for Facilitating Poverty Alleviation—A Case Study of Kiwifruit Industry in Shaanxi, China
Agriculture 2021, 11(5), 462; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/agriculture11050462 - 19 May 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 841
Abstract
Market-based initiatives like agriculture value chain (AVC) are becoming progressively pervasive to support smallholder rural farmers and assist them in entering larger market interventions and providing a pathway of enhancing their socioeconomic well-being. Moreover, it may also foster staggering effects towards the post-era [...] Read more.
Market-based initiatives like agriculture value chain (AVC) are becoming progressively pervasive to support smallholder rural farmers and assist them in entering larger market interventions and providing a pathway of enhancing their socioeconomic well-being. Moreover, it may also foster staggering effects towards the post-era poverty alleviation in rural areas and possessed a significant theoretical and practical influence for modern agricultural development. The prime objective of the study is to explore the effects of smallholder farmers’ participation in the agricultural value chain for availing rural development and poverty alleviation. Specifically, we have crafted the assessment employing pre-production (improved fertilizers usage), in-production (modern preservation technology), and post-production (supply chain) participation and interventions of smallholder farmers. The empirical data has been collected from a micro survey dataset of 623 kiwifruit farmers from July to September in Shaanxi, China. We have employed propensity score matching (PSM), probit, and OLS models to explore the multidimensional poverty reduction impact and heterogeneity of farmers’ participation in the agricultural value chain. The results show that the total number of poor farmers who have experienced one-dimensional and two-dimensional poverty is relatively high (66.3%). We also find that farmers’ participation in agricultural value chain activities has a significant poverty reduction effect. The multidimensional poverty level of farmers using improved fertilizer, organizational acquisition, and using storage technology (compared with non-participating farmers) decreased by 30.1%, 46.5%, and 25.0%, respectively. The multidimensional poverty reduction degree of male farmers using improved fertilizer and participating in the organizational acquisition is greater than that of women. The multidimensional poverty reduction degree of female farmers using storage and fresh-keeping technology has a greater impact than the males using storage and improved storage technology. Government should widely promote the value chain in the form of pre-harvest, production, and post-harvest technology. The public–private partnership should also be strengthened for availing innovative technologies and infrastructure development. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Agricultural Food Marketing, Economics and Policies)
Article
Marketing of Vegetable Seeds: Practice and Behavioral Inclinations of Vegetable Seed Sellers and Farmers in Selected Areas of Bangladesh
Agriculture 2021, 11(4), 364; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/agriculture11040364 - 16 Apr 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 850
Abstract
This research was based on a survey conducted in Bangladesh in three major seed-producing divisions, viz., Dhaka, Mymensingh, and Chittagong. Descriptive data was gathered by randomly selecting 100 peasants and 100 rural retailers for in-depth interviews. The general accounting approach was also used [...] Read more.
This research was based on a survey conducted in Bangladesh in three major seed-producing divisions, viz., Dhaka, Mymensingh, and Chittagong. Descriptive data was gathered by randomly selecting 100 peasants and 100 rural retailers for in-depth interviews. The general accounting approach was also used to assess profit and loss. The objective of the study was to analyze the marketing tendencies of vegetable seed farmers and sellers. The results showed a lack of market information, poor institutions and arrangements, poor marketing infrastructures, transportation system, and high and unfair profit margin distribution among the value chain actors with little share to the farmers in the vegetable seed market. These findings are indicators of poor marketing efficiency and thereby suboptimal operation of the seed marketing system. The significant determinants of market supply of vegetable seeds were found to be the average current price, age, the total size of land, farmers’ experience, sex, number of oxen, and access to market information. The determinants of demand for vegetable seeds—family size, purchase frequency, the average current price, income level, average expenditure on food and purchasing, profit or loss of vegetable seed farming—were found to be significant in the study. According to the findings of this report, vegetable seed sector in Bangladesh needs more government support, especially in terms of marketing policies in order to improve the current state of vegetable seed farming. Vegetable seed farming was not profitable due to a lack of technology and knowledge, as well as a lack of funding. With the existing status of infrastructure, the presence of middlemen is unavoidable. As a result, farmers have no alternative but to follow the orders of the middlemen, resulting in seed quality problems. Hence, the results are indicative of the measures that should be taken for production, market infrastructure, arrangements, and institutions to improve the functioning of the seed marketing system. It also proposes a vegetable seed distribution channel through which a cooperative community would serve as a collecting hub for a more efficient marketing scheme. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Agricultural Food Marketing, Economics and Policies)
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Article
The Role of the Start-Up Aid for Young Farmers in the Adoption of Innovative Agricultural Activities: The Case of Aloe Vera
Agriculture 2021, 11(4), 349; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/agriculture11040349 - 14 Apr 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 651
Abstract
The poor generational renewal has been identified as a key issue for the EU policy that undermines the restructuring of the agricultural sector and the revitalisation of rural areas. The start-up aid for young farmers is one of the main EU-driven policy measures [...] Read more.
The poor generational renewal has been identified as a key issue for the EU policy that undermines the restructuring of the agricultural sector and the revitalisation of rural areas. The start-up aid for young farmers is one of the main EU-driven policy measures that try to mitigate this trend, by facilitating the initial investment of young newcomers in agriculture. At the same time, innovative crops with appealing characteristics are proposed as promising alternatives with high socioeconomic and low environmental impacts. Recently, a draft new call of the start-up aid for young farmers measure has been set under public consultation in Greece, which significantly alters the requirements and the level of support of the beneficiaries, compared to the previous one. The aim of this study is to explore the consequences of this change to the desirability to invest in the organic aloe vera crop, one of the leading innovating crops in Greece. In this study, taking into consideration the embedded risk and uncertainty, we utilise a stochastic version of the Net Present Value (NPV) analysis, a common discount cash flows method to detect the desirability of an investment. Results indicate that the potential alteration of the start-up aid for young farmers deteriorates the desirability of this investment and thus prevents farmers from its adoption. The analysis provides useful insights by highlighting risk factors and the possible impacts of policy measures on the desirability of innovative crops; thus, it can be useful both for investors and policymakers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Agricultural Food Marketing, Economics and Policies)
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Article
Is Futurization the Culprit for the Violent Fluctuation in China’s Apple Spot Price?
Agriculture 2021, 11(4), 342; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/agriculture11040342 - 12 Apr 2021
Viewed by 657
Abstract
China aims to utilize the futures market to stabilize agricultural product price fluctuation by quantifying the effects of risk transfer and price discovery. However, the role of futurization has been questioned and even posited as the cause of drastic fluctuations in spot market [...] Read more.
China aims to utilize the futures market to stabilize agricultural product price fluctuation by quantifying the effects of risk transfer and price discovery. However, the role of futurization has been questioned and even posited as the cause of drastic fluctuations in spot market prices. This research aims to clarify the impact of futurization on the price fluctuation of agricultural products and to provide policy reference for the development of the agricultural futures market through the research. Here, we examine the spot price data for apples and use Interrupted time-series analysis (ITSA) and GARCH models to estimate the impact of apple futures on the volatility of spot prices. Our findings demonstrate that the launch of China’s apple futures did not increase the volatility of apple spot prices; that is, futurization was not the cause of skyrocketing apple spot prices. In the long term, our results suggest that futures will help reduce the volatility of apple spot prices and that the introduction of futures will ultimately reduce the price volatility of agricultural products. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Agricultural Food Marketing, Economics and Policies)
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Article
Targeting Youths’ Intentions to Avoid Food Waste: Segmenting for Better Policymaking
Agriculture 2021, 11(4), 284; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/agriculture11040284 - 25 Mar 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 960
Abstract
Food waste is a global challenge that raises many questions about the reasons and prevalence of this phenomenon in all sectors of the economy. The youth is regarded as a consumer group, which is the most prone to food waste. This paper aims [...] Read more.
Food waste is a global challenge that raises many questions about the reasons and prevalence of this phenomenon in all sectors of the economy. The youth is regarded as a consumer group, which is the most prone to food waste. This paper aims to understand their food waste intentions to support tailored policies for policymakers, retailers, and other market actors. We applied the extended Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) to find the relevant variables that affect the youth’s intention not to waste food. Besides creating a general model, we divided the sample into segments differing in respondents’ intentions to avoid food waste and specific socioeconomic characteristics. The data confirm significant differences between young women and men from urban and rural areas. Each of the segments was characterized by specific latent variables, influencing the intentions to avoid food waste. This segmentation allowed for developing policy recommendations that were tailored to each segment. It is a unique approach to differentiate the youth to unveil their specific food-waste intentions. Based on the above, we conclude that segmenting is a useful approach to the general TPB model, allowing for interesting insights. A fine segmentation is also a milestone to develop tailored policies, interventions, and communication on food waste reduction in rural and urban areas. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Agricultural Food Marketing, Economics and Policies)
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Article
Assessing Sustainability of Organic Livestock Farming in Sicily: A Case Study Using the FAO SAFA Framework
Agriculture 2021, 11(3), 274; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/agriculture11030274 - 23 Mar 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 884
Abstract
Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and pollutants, soil erosion and groundwater pollution are some of the negative aspects blamed on livestock farming, so their level of sustainability needs to be assessed, taking into account the territory in which they operate. The research focuses on [...] Read more.
Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and pollutants, soil erosion and groundwater pollution are some of the negative aspects blamed on livestock farming, so their level of sustainability needs to be assessed, taking into account the territory in which they operate. The research focuses on the assessment of sustainability performance in the four dimensions of good governance: environmental integrity, economic resilience and social well-being, considered by the ‘‘Sustainability Assessment of Food and Agriculture Systems’’ (SAFA) tool developed by Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO). The objective of applying this methodology is to highlight the sustainability dimensions in which the ten analyzed farms are weakest and the ones in which they show the most strength, in order to provide farmers a tool to understand the criticalities on which to intervene. The farms considered follow the principles of agroecology and organic farming, which are decisive in the pursuit of sustainable development. The overall results show a satisfactory level of sustainability with high prospects for improvement, in line with the EU commitments undertaken in the Green Deal and the Millennium Development Goals. Livestock farms must, therefore, be encouraged and accompanied with targeted technical assistance strategies and appropriate agroecological protocols. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Agricultural Food Marketing, Economics and Policies)
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Article
Evaluating the Financial Health of Agricultural Enterprises in the Conditions of the Slovak Republic Using Bankruptcy Models
Agriculture 2021, 11(3), 242; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/agriculture11030242 - 12 Mar 2021
Viewed by 597
Abstract
Under the influence of the change in the overall economic environment, the problem of measuring the performance of a company and its financial health is also changing. At present, every agricultural company is exposed to a number of internal as well as external [...] Read more.
Under the influence of the change in the overall economic environment, the problem of measuring the performance of a company and its financial health is also changing. At present, every agricultural company is exposed to a number of internal as well as external risks, the failure of which can lead to potential bankruptcy. It is a known fact that the risks in agriculture are significantly greater than those in other sectors of the national economy. Proper diagnosis of critical aspects and measuring the development of individual financial indicators of agricultural holdings are basic prerequisites for eliminating these risks and maintaining, as well as increasing, their competitiveness. Among the key tools for measuring the financial situation of a company are bankruptcy models, three of which have been used (Altman model, Taffler model, and Bonity index). The aim of this study was to identify the comprehensive financial health of 469 agricultural enterprises in the Slovak Republic using the three above-mentioned bankruptcy models in 2016. The obtained results were verified using the Kruskal–Wallis test, Levene test, or Moran index. Altman’s model indicated potential future problems of businesses and agricultural cooperatives. Using the Bonity index, the neutral situation was assessed (the financial health could be regarded as neither insufficient nor optimal). Taffler model offered contradicted results and does not expect the occurrence of problems soon. In the study, we also verified the assumption of the dependence of financial health of companies on the legal form and territorial division, which was confirmed to be insignificant. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Agricultural Food Marketing, Economics and Policies)
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Article
Modeling Profitability in the Jamaican Coffee Industry
Agriculture 2021, 11(2), 121; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/agriculture11020121 - 03 Feb 2021
Viewed by 923
Abstract
It is well known that producers of agricultural products do not able to capture most of the value from what they grow. As such, it is important for producers to be attuned to the various factors that impact the viability of their products. [...] Read more.
It is well known that producers of agricultural products do not able to capture most of the value from what they grow. As such, it is important for producers to be attuned to the various factors that impact the viability of their products. One such potential avenue for coffee producers is developing a strong awareness of profitability across their respective geographic regions. This research presents a fine-scale geospatial profitability model for coffee production using the test case of the Jamaican Coffee Industry, a sector which once guaranteed profitability but now presents variable (often losing) returns for many producers, this research presents a cost-surface model for coffee production in the island of Jamaica. Results indicated large scale profitability in the 2016–2017 coffee year but limited profitability in the 2019–2019 coffee year, highlighting the important role of revenue fluctuation in island-wide profitability. Results underscore importance of scenario planning in the coffee production cycle. By understanding the spatial properties of profitability producers will obtain better decision-making insight for production and management decisions in the coffee industry around the world. The geospatial profitability model establishes a baseline approach that can be accessed by industry stakeholders of varying technological capacities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Agricultural Food Marketing, Economics and Policies)
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Article
Direct Measurement of Mass and Economic Harvest and Post-Harvest Losses in Spanish Persimmon Primary Production
Agriculture 2020, 10(12), 581; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/agriculture10120581 - 25 Nov 2020
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1673
Abstract
Globally, one in every three produced kilograms is wasted at some point along the entire agri-food chain. Unfortunately, knowledge about losses and waste is not equally distributed along the food chain. In fact, in some stages the primary data required to properly estimate [...] Read more.
Globally, one in every three produced kilograms is wasted at some point along the entire agri-food chain. Unfortunately, knowledge about losses and waste is not equally distributed along the food chain. In fact, in some stages the primary data required to properly estimate the magnitude of the problem are lacking. This is especially true for agricultural production, for which studies that have used on-site measurements are scarce. The present study analyses the mass losses and unpaid share that occur during the harvest process and persimmon storage in warehouses in the Valencia region, Spain. The study was carried out using on-site measurements and primary data from the harvest and storage phases. Losses were also classified according to their causes. The total mass and economic losses were estimated as either 29.5% for the total produced volume or 38.5% for the number of finally commercialised kilograms. This work aims to highlight the complex problem in primary production with the mass and economic losses that farmers bear and to show the potential of loss reduction measures. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Agricultural Food Marketing, Economics and Policies)
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Article
Milk Market Integration between Poland and the EU Countries
Agriculture 2020, 10(11), 561; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/agriculture10110561 - 20 Nov 2020
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 755
Abstract
Milk is one of the most essential agricultural products in the EU. One of the major milk producers in the EU is Poland. Polish farmers account for supplying 8% of the total EU production. Nevertheless, Polish milk prices differ from the prices recorded [...] Read more.
Milk is one of the most essential agricultural products in the EU. One of the major milk producers in the EU is Poland. Polish farmers account for supplying 8% of the total EU production. Nevertheless, Polish milk prices differ from the prices recorded in its western neighbors. The aim of the article has been to evaluate the dynamics of the relationships between milk prices in Poland and in the EU countries. To develop it, the monthly raw milk prices, covering the period January 2005 through December 2018, were applied. The calculations were made for the entire selected period as well as for two sub-periods: 2005–2011 and 2012–2018. The results were used to confirm the milk market integration between Poland and the EU countries. Besides, it must be noted that the relations increased considerably since 2012. The EU countries which have recorded the greatest impact on the prices in Poland are Germany, Ireland, France and Slovakia. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Agricultural Food Marketing, Economics and Policies)
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