Special Issue "Greenhouse Technology and Management"

A special issue of Agriculture (ISSN 2077-0472). This special issue belongs to the section "Agricultural Technology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 November 2021).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Araceli Peña
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Research Centre CIAIMBITAL, University of Almería, Ctra. de Sacramento s/n, 04120 Almería, Spain
Interests: greenhouse structures; plant protection; climate control; horticulture, greenhouse; land scape; ecosystems; product quality; field crops; environment; soil characteristics; variety selection; fertilization; irrigation; pest management

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Greenhouse technology has evolved from being a niche cultivation system for specialty crops to becoming the backbone of intensive agriculture both in developed economies and in emerging markets. From a consumer point of view, greenhouse technology has provided a wide availability of high-quality fresh produce all year round at affordable prices, a factor that has undoubtedly permanently changed the market dynamics. From a technological point of view, the reasons for the rapid expansion of greenhouse technology and, in particular, of greenhouse horticulture are manifold, but one main factor arises above all other considerations: Satisfying the increasing consumer demand for the enhancement and stabilization of quality of produce is one of the most imperative challenges of modern agriculture. In this view, it is essential to remember that the product quality of field crops does not improve after harvest and, therefore, a deeper understanding of how to manipulate the pre-harvest factors to maintain and/or maximize the quality of produce going into storage is of crucial importance. The effects of pre-harvest factors on the ultimate quality of harvested products are often overlooked and underestimated, although a wide spectrum of pre-harvest factors, including environmental conditions and field management practices, directly or indirectly impacts the qualitative traits of field crops produce. Particularly, seasonal climatic conditions, soil fertility, variety selection, fertilization, irrigation, pest control, and harvest time play a crucial role in determining post-harvest quality attributes (such as color, flavor, texture, and nutritional value of the harvested product), deterioration, and, subsequently, consumers’ decision to purchase the product in the marketplace.

This Special Issue focuses on the role of pre-harvest factors in determining the product quality of field crops, with a major emphasis on the best agronomic practices, and enabling tools for obtaining products with high and stable quality. This issue will publish highly interdisciplinary studies embracing disciplines from agriculture and biology, to chemistry and human nutrition. All types of articles, such as original research, and reviews are welcome.

Prof. Dr. Araceli Peña
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Agriculture is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • greenhouse structures
  • plant protection
  • climate control
  • horticulture
  • greenhouse
  • landscape
  • ecosystems
  • product quality
  • field crops
  • environment
  • soil characteristics
  • variety selection
  • fertilization
  • irrigation
  • pest management

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Practical Structural Design and Construction of an Innovative Composite Plastic Greenhouse
Agriculture 2021, 11(11), 1051; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/agriculture11111051 - 26 Oct 2021
Viewed by 485
Abstract
A composite plastic material made of recycled Polyethylene terephthalate (PET), Nylon, and glass fiber reinforced Nylon was innovated and applied to the construction of a prototype simple greenhouse in this study. With reference to the mechanical properties of a conventional galvanized steel greenhouse, [...] Read more.
A composite plastic material made of recycled Polyethylene terephthalate (PET), Nylon, and glass fiber reinforced Nylon was innovated and applied to the construction of a prototype simple greenhouse in this study. With reference to the mechanical properties of a conventional galvanized steel greenhouse, sectional dimensions of the composite plastic structural members were determined. Structural performances of the conventional galvanized steel and the composite plastic greenhouse models were analyzed under static design wind loads. It was realized that the greenhouse model designed with composite plastic 田-sections of 5 mm wall thickness could have peak displacement response and sectional forces comparable to that of the galvanized steel greenhouse. Therefore, the 田-sections with 5 mm wall thickness were manufactured and used to construct the prototype simple greenhouse. On-site free vibration tests were conducted to estimate the dynamic characteristics of the prototype for validating the design assumptions and assembly procedure. The test results indicated that the prototype had a similar vibration period to that predicted from the numerical model. Moreover, the composite plastic greenhouse could have an average damping ratio of 6.2%. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Greenhouse Technology and Management)
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Article
Analysis of Heat and Mass Distribution in a Single- and Multi-Span Greenhouse Microclimate
Agriculture 2021, 11(9), 891; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/agriculture11090891 - 16 Sep 2021
Viewed by 756
Abstract
Recently, heat and mass distributions within a greenhouse were assumed to be homogeneous. Heat is gained or lost in absolute terms, and crop contribution in a greenhouse or its effect is not considered. In this study, statistical analyses were conducted to establish the [...] Read more.
Recently, heat and mass distributions within a greenhouse were assumed to be homogeneous. Heat is gained or lost in absolute terms, and crop contribution in a greenhouse or its effect is not considered. In this study, statistical analyses were conducted to establish the significance of heat and mass variation at sensor nodes in two single-span and multi-span greenhouses. Three greenhouses were used in this study, 168 m2 floor area a single-layered (SLG), double-layered (DLG) single-span gothic roof type greenhouses, and 7572.6 m2 floor area multi-span greenhouse (MSG). The microclimatic parameters investigated were temperature (T), relative humidity (RH), solar radiation (SR), carbon dioxide (CO2), and vapor pressure deficit (VPD). To check their horizontal distribution, all microclimate data collected from each sensor node in each greenhouse were subjected to descriptive statistics and Tukey honestly significant difference (HSD) test. The lowest minimum temperatures of 2.93 °C, 3.33 °C and 10.50 °C were recorded at sensor points in SLG, DLG, and MSG, respectively, whereas the highest maximum temperatures of 29.17 °C, 29.07 °C and 27.20 °C were recorded at sensor point, in SLG, DLG, and MSG, respectively. The difference between the center and the side into the single-span was approximately 0.88–1.0 °C and in the MSG was approximately 1.03 °C. Significant variation was observed in the horizontal distribution of T, RH, SR, and VPD within SLG, DLG, and MSG. Also significant was CO2 in the MSG. Estimating the energy demand of greenhouses should be done based on the distribution rather than assuming microclimatic parameters homogeneity, especially for T, with VPD as a control parameter. Such estimation should also be done using a crop model that considers instant changes in air and crop temperature. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Greenhouse Technology and Management)
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